Posts Tagged ‘spine physician’

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center Welcomes Dr. Lisa Foster

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center welcomes a new non-operative spine physician, Lisa Foster, MD, to its Johns Creek practice. Foster joins Kyle Hammond, MD; Neeru Jayanthi, MD; Scott Maughon, MD; Oluseun Olufade, MD; Mathew Pombo, MD; and Richard Thomas, MD at the clinic located at 6335 Hospital Parkway in Johns Creek.

“Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center now has 23 physicians specializing in the diagnosis and management of spinal disorders ranging from the most simple herniated disc or back sprain, to the most complicated scoliosis deformities or spine tumors,” says Scott D. Boden, MD, director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center.

Foster is a board certified, fellowship trained interventional physiatrist. She has extensive training in minimally invasive, fluoroscopic guided procedures for the treatment of various spinal disorders.

“We’re confident Dr. Foster will strengthen the presence of the Emory Spine Center at our Johns Creek location to make world class spine care more accessible for patients north of the metro Atlanta area,” says Boden.

Foster says she looks forward to working with patients in Johns Creek and surrounding areas to improve their quality of life and help them meet their healthcare needs.

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center has also added six new exam rooms to serve more patients.

About Dr. Lisa Foster

Lisa Foster, MD, is a board certified, fellowship trained interventional physiatrist, specializing in non-operative spine care.

A native of Wichita, KS, she received her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at the University of Kansas and her medical degree from the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Dr. Foster completed both her residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and her subspecialty fellowship training in Interventional Pain Medicine at Emory University Hospital.

Dr. Foster has published numerous articles and presented at national conferences in the fields of spine and rehabilitation medicine. Most recently, she was a contributing author for a book chapter on the workup and conservative management of lumbar degenerative disk disease in JL Pinherio-Franco’s Advanced Concepts in Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease.

Dr. Foster employs a comprehensive, multi-modal approach for the treatment of spinal conditions with the goal of optimizing function and improving the quality of life of her patients. She has extensive training in minimally invasive, fluoroscopic guided procedures for the treatment of various spine disorders.

Outside of medicine, Dr. Foster enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and hiking in remote parts of globe.

8 Tips to Fix Your Posture at Work

Good PostureFor the average working American, it is common to sit a minimum of eight hours a day and a majority of that behind a computer. I frequently see patients with neck and back pain that are not related to a specific injury, but rather from spending many hours at their desk (which usually involves using a computer). Sitting for extended periods of time can lead to a variety of health issues, including fatigue, muscle and joint pain.

Do you spend a lot of time behind a desk? If so, make sure your chair and work station are set up to fit you properly and influence good posture. Here are a few tips to help get you started:

  1. MONITOR POSITION: You should be able to sit straight in front of your computer and not have to turn from side to side to access it. The top half of the monitor should be in line with your eye height.
  2. DISTANCE FROM MONITOR: Keep your arms and elbows close to your body and parallel to the floor. You should not have to reach forward to use your keyboard. (Tip: try sitting about 18 inches from your computer screen).
  3. NECK: People who spend a lot of time on the phone often complain of neck pain. If you find yourself cradling your phone between your shoulder and chin so you can type and talk at the same time, switch to a headset or use a speaker phone. Also, be careful to not protrude your neck forward while looking at the computer screen. (Tip: Try keeping your ear in line with your shoulder)
  4. SHOULDERS: Keep your shoulders down and relaxed.
  5. BACK: Sit with your back pushed to the back of the chair with some form of lower back support between you and the chair back.
  6. ELBOWS and WRISTS: While typing, elbows should be at a 90-degree angle from your body, and your wrists and hands should be in a straight line. Make sure not to place stress on your wrists – keep them in a neutral position, not arched or bent. (Tip: Have the keyboard and mouse near each other and at the same height as your elbows).
  7. LEGS: When you’re sitting, your hips/thighs should be parallel to the ground or a little higher than your knees. Also, you don’t want the end of chair hitting the back of your knees—make sure to leave a little gap.
  8. FEET: Feet should touch the ground and lay flat on the floor. Sitting cross-legged or on one leg can lead to slouching. (Tip: if your feet cannot touch the floor, try using a footrest or box.)

Remember to give yourself breaks after you have been sitting for an extended period of time. Get up and move around regularly throughout the day, in fact, for every hour your work at your desk, give yourself several 1-2 minute breaks. Take a quick walk around the office, grab some water, chat with a coworker, or at least stand up and stretch.

I always tell my patients to listen to their body. If you are having pain, your body is trying to send you a message. If you experience neck or back pain that does not improve after trying the tips above, make an appointment with an Emory Spine physiatrist for further evaluation and treatment. To make an appointment, please call 404-778-3350 to speak to a member of our team.

About Diana Sodiq, DO

Dr. Diana SodiqDiana Sodiq, DO, is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry). As an osteopathic physician, Dr. Sodiq is trained in both traditional medicine as well as osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT). She started practicing at Emory in 2010.

 

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