Posts Tagged ‘Spine Pain’

How Cell Phone Use Impacts Our Neck Over Time

neck-illustrationTechnology has become an incredibly integral part of our lives. As it has adapted and changed, so have humans in the 21st century; we’re constantly on our smartphones—texting, calling, checking our Facebook updates, often for hours every day—and it may have a significant detrimental effect on our bodies.

The average human head weighs between 10 and 12 pounds in a neutral position–when your ears are over your shoulders. But as the neck bends forward and down, the weight on the cervical spine (neck) begins to increase, causing stress. According to a study in 2008, if you lean 15 degrees forward, it’s as if your head weighs 27 pounds. If you lean 30 degrees, it’s as if your head weighs 40 pounds. If you lean 45 degrees, it’s 49 pounds. When you’re hunched over at a 60 degree angle, like most of us are many times throughout the day, you’re putting a 60 pound strain on your neck.

So what does this mean for your spine? This pressure can put a lot of stress on your neck and spine, pulling it out of alignment. Over time, this poor posture can lead to disc herniations, pinched nerves, metabolic problems, degeneration and even spine surgery. Think about the effect of 60 pounds for a moment – it’s the equivalent 5 bowling balls weighing 12 pounds or an eight year old child hanging around your neck.

While it is nearly impossible to avoid the technologies that cause these issues, there are some simple steps we can take to take this strain off of our necks. A few easy fixes include:

  • Take frequent breaks while using any mobile device or desktop computer.
  • Practice exercises to help you build strength, such as standing in a doorway with your arms extended and push your chest forward to build muscles that help posture.
  • Be mindful of your posture – keep your neck back and your ears over your shoulders.
  • Look down at your mobile device with your eyes without bending your neck.

In short, continue to enjoy the incredible benefits of your smartphone, but remember to keep your head up!

About Dr. Refai

refai-danielDaniel Refai is the director of spinal oncology at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Refai focuses on both intradural and extradural spinal tumors as well as metastatic and primary tumors of the spine. He performs complex spine tumor surgery and spine reconstruction surgery. He also directs the stereotactic radiosurgery division of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center for spine tumor treatment. Dr. Refai’s research interests include outcome analysis following surgery and radiosurgery for spine tumors. He has published extensively on the treatment of spinal disorders and has developed innovative multidisciplinary approaches for treatment. H  e is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the North American Spine Society.

Dr. Refai completed neurosurgical residency at Washington University in Saint Louis under the tutelage of Ralph Dacey MD. He spent six months as a specialist registrar in neurosurgery at Beaumont Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. He completed a combined orthopaedic and neurosurgery spine fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic under Edward Benzel MD, Iain Kalfas MD, Gordon Bell MD, and others. He specializes in all aspects of complex spine surgery and is actively in clinical research. Dr. Refai enjoys teaching and has received numerous patient and medical education distinctions throughout his training.volved in clinical research. Dr. Refai enjoys teaching and has received numerous patient and medical education distinctions throughout his training.

Sources:

[1] Hansraj, Kenneth. “Assessment of Stresses in the Surgical Spine Caused by Posture and Position of the Head.” https://cbsminnesota.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/spine-study.pdf

 

How Aging Affects Your Cervical Spine – Part I: Pinched Nerve

Pinched NerveThe cervical spine refers to that portion of the spinal column that is within our neck. This section of the spine has two essential roles: providing flexibility so that we can move our head up and down and side to side, and protecting the spinal cord nerves that pass through it. Cervical radiculopathy, or pinched nerve, tends to occur when the nerve roots are irritated or compressed by one of many conditions.

Cause

Cervical radiculopathy can occur in a wide variety of patients, with those younger than 50 tending to suffer as a result of disc herniations. Other than trauma or injury, degenerative conditions as a result of aging are the main cause of neck pain. As disks age, they lose height and the vertebrae move closer together, causing the body to respond by forming more bone—called spurs—around the disk to strengthen it. However, the spurs can also contribute to stiffening of the spine. Bone spurs may also narrow the area of the foramen and pinch the nerve root.

Symptoms

The primary symptoms of cervical radiculopathy include pain radiating from the neck into the shoulder, upper arm, forearm, or hand.  Sometimes the symptoms radiate into all of these areas, whereas in other cases, the symptoms may radiate to only some of these areas.  Other associated symptoms can include tingling and numbness.  In some cases, weakness of various muscle groups in the shoulder, arm, and hand may occur.

Treatments

Non-surgical:

Interventional treatments for cervical radiculopathy are generally attempted first and may include:

  • Physical therapy and/or exercise to help relieve the pressure on the nerve root. Stretching as many dimensions of the neck as possible is essential to maintain flexibility and relieve chronic stiffness.
  • Medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to reduce swelling and pain and analgesics to relieve pain.
  • Use of a cervical collar, cervical pillows, or neck traction may also be recommended to stabilize the neck and improve alignment.
  • Injections of steroid medications around the affected nerve root, commonly known as nerve root or epidural injections, can be considered for pain relief as well.

Surgical Treatment:

If symptoms persist despite nonoperative care, or if there is substantial motor weakness, surgical treatment is recommended and generally has excellent outcomes.  In fact, cervical spine surgery generally has the best outcomes of any spinal operation.  Surgical treatment generally involves relieving the pressure off of the affected nerve root.  Depending on the circumstances, it may be performed either from the front (anterior) or back (posterior) of the neck, although the anterior approach is more common.

Some of the surgical spine procedures used to treat cervical radiculopathy at the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Center are:

At the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center, our internationally-recognized spine surgeons research, pioneer and refine the most effective approaches to treating a variety of spine conditions.

Should you make an appointment with an Emory spine specialist? Take our five minute quiz and find out!

About Dr. Rhee

John Rhee, MDJohn M. Rhee, MD, is a Spinal Surgeon and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery specializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis) and surgery for spinal tumors. Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies. He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery. In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings. Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and books, and he has received numerous awards and honors. He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of major textbooks on spine surgery techniques.

Related Resources

Spinal Tumor Symptoms & Treatment

Spinal TumorsTumors, whether cancerous (malignant tumors) or noncancerous (benign tumors), can develop and affect bones anywhere in the body, but when a tumor develops in or near your spinal cord or within the bones of your spine, it can be an especially serious condition.

Your spine is an extremely important part of your body as it holds up your head, shoulders and upper body. It also houses and protects your spinal cord and the nerve roots that control your arms, legs, and torso. The spine is made up of 31 small bones, called vertebrae, which are stacked on top of one another and make up the three sections of your spine (cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine) forming the natural curves of your back.

Your spinal cord runs through the middle part of the vertebra, which is called the spinal canal, and extends from the skull to the lower back. Spinal nerves branch out from the spinal cord through openings in the vertebrae, carrying signals between the brain and muscles.

The most common type of spinal tumor is one that spreads (a metastasis) from cancer arising in another part of the body, such as the breast, lung, kidney, prostate, thyroid, blood cells, or other tissues. Rarely, spinal tumors arise from the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Primary spinal tumors are those that arise from the bones in the spine – these are also relatively rare.

The closeness of a tumor to the spine and nerves that run through and between your vertebrae determines the severity of the condition. Tumors can compress and interfere with nerve function, affecting the messages being sent to and from your brain to the rest of your body. Since the spinal cord is relatively narrow, tumors within it may cause symptoms on both sides of the body. Tumors can also weaken the vertebrae, causing the spine to collapse and potentially cause pain or injure the nerves housed within.

Spinal tumors are different for each unique patient since they originate from different areas or develop from different cell types. Depending on where the tumor is, how advanced it is, how quickly it is growing and whether it is malignant or benign, symptoms and treatment options vary.

Common symptoms of spinal tumors include:

  • Pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of sensation or numbness (in the legs, arms or trunk)
  • Loss of bladder/ bowel control
  • Difficulty using arms or legs, inability to walk

Treatment for spinal tumors is determined on a case by case basis and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy or other medications. If surgery is necessary, the goals are to stabilize the spinal column, relieve nerve pressure caused by the tumor, protect the nerves and spinal cord and remove as much of the tumor as safely possible.

For more information about spinal tumors and spine tumor treatment, visit Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Our world renowned, highly skilled, specialized and experienced team includes orthopedic spine surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthopedic oncologists and radiologists, all working together to diagnose and treat a wide range of spinal tumors.

About Dr. Rhee

John Rhee, MDJohn M. Rhee, MD, is a Spinal Surgeon and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery specializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis) and surgery for spinal tumors. Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies. He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery. In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings. Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and books, and he has received numerous awards and honors. He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of major textbooks on spine surgery techniques.

Related Resources

Patient Video Story: Back to Life after Spinal Tumor Surgery

“I’m a Medical Miracle!” : One Emory Spine Center Patient’s Experience

Andy ReynoldsBy Andy Reynolds, Emory Spine Center Patient 

In midsummer of 2010, my riding lawn mower flipped over and pinned me underneath. My back was broken in three parts. I had surgery to fuse and implant rods and screws. My pain never went away, so later I had the rods and screws removed in hopes of pain relief.

My pain worsened and more issues developed within the next four years. My nerves were damaged which lead to horrific pain, migraines, insomnia, and I developed Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. I could hardly make it through a day at work, I wore a brace and had seen about 16 different doctors before I was referred to a spine specialist. That spine specialist was my medical miracle doctor, Emory neurosurgeon, Dr. Gerald Rodts.

Dr. Rodts showed me a CT scan image of my spine and surprisingly revealed that my fracture was never repaired, and therefore, never properly healed. Dr. Rodts was in disbelief that I was not paralyzed since my back was still broken.

I had spine surgery November 24, 2014 at Emory University Hospital Midtown. During my surgery, Dr. Rodts worked his magic and reconstructed the damaged area of my spine so my nerves were no longer pinched.

Today, I don’t have a single issue left from my incident and my life has changed drastically. I went from enduring a multitude of health issues, including horrific pain, to being completely healthy and happy. Since my spine surgery, I can stand longer now, travel and go in the pool. I am able to participate in activities I enjoy like outdoor planting and am looking forward to yard work and even getting back on my lawn mower come Spring. I also cannot wait to get back to lifting weights at the gym.

When I look back at photos of me, I can see how bad of a shape I was in by the pained look on my face. My medical miracle would not have happened if it hadn’t been for Dr. Rodts and the spine team at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Everyone was wonderful; it was like a five star experience.

A note from Dr. Gerald Rodts, Jr.

Andy had originally suffered a severe fracture of the lumbar vertebra, at a crucial transition area between his lower thoracic spine and upper lumbar spine. Despite having had surgery to stabilize the fracture, it ultimately never healed. It became a source of chronic, severe back pain. In order to fix the problem, the surgery required a different approach.

The surgery was done with cardiothoracic surgeon, Allen Pickens, MD. With the help of Dr. Pickens, an incision was made on the chest wall (flank) on the left side. A rib was removed, and the large diaphragm muscle disconnected from the spine. The fracture pieces of vertebra were removed, and the spine was rebuilt with a titanium fusion cage, rib bone graft, and two screws and a rod. The diaphragm muscle was reconnected, and the chest wall closed. This procedure renders the spine immediately strong and stable, and the area of the fracture then continues to strengthen as the bone graft heals.

To learn more about the wide range of spine conditions treated at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, click here or call 404-778-3350.

About Dr. Rodts

Gerald Rodts, MDGerald E. Rodts, Jr., MD,  is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. In addition, he is the Director of the Spine Fellowship Program in the Department of Neurosurgery at The Emory Spine Center and Chief of Neurosurgery Spine Service at The Emory Clinic.

Dr. Rodts graduated from Princeton University with a degree in biology and a Certificate of Study of Science in Human Affairs. He received his M.D. from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and completed his neurosurgery residency training at the University of California in Los Angeles, followed by a 1-year fellowship in complex spinal neurosurgery at Emory University. Dr. Rodts has served as the President of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons as well as serving as the Secretary. He has also served as the Chairman of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves. He is also a founding editor of the award-winning website, Spine Universe. He has been selected as one of the Castle and Connelley’s “Top Doc” neurosurgeons in the United States ten years in a row and has received a similar distinction in Atlanta Magazine annually. He is a neurotrauma consultant to the National Football League.

Dr. Rodts manages patients with spinal disorders, and specializes in neoplastic, rheumatoid, degenerative, traumatic spinal disorders, syringomyelia and Chiari malformations. His research interests are in computer-assisted, image-guided surgery and minimally-invasive spinal techniques.

Areas of Clinical Interest:

  • Complex spine surgery and reconstruction
  • Computer-assisted image-guided spine surgery
  • Minimally-invasive spine surgery
  • Revision spinal surgery

Spinal Stenosis: Treatment Options

spinal stenosisSpinal stenosis is a condition that occurs when the small spinal canal, which contains the nerve roots and spinal cord, becomes compressed (or narrowed). This narrowing occurs most often in the lower back or neck, and can put pressure on the spinal cord and nerves, causing a “pinching” of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. The pinching can lead to a variety of symptoms, including pain, weakness and numbness. Symptoms often start slowly and get worse over time, and typically a person with this condition complains of severe pain in the legs, calves or lower back when standing or walking. Other symptoms include abnormal bowel/and or bladder function and loss of sexual function. Depending on where the narrowing takes place, you may feel these symptoms in the lower back and legs, neck, shoulder or arms. Usually, it is relieved by sitting down, leaning over or sitting forward.

In most cases, the narrowing is caused by osteoarthritis of the spinal column and discs between the vertebrae. It may also be caused by a thickening of the ligaments in the back, as well as by a bulging of the discs that separate the vertebrae. If you suffer from any or all of the above you should schedule an appointment with an orthopaedic spine specialist to determine if you have spinal stenosis.

How is Spinal Stenosis Treated?

The preferred treatment for cases of persistent back pain from spinal stenosis is a combination of physical therapy, prescribed exercise, and medications for chronic pain. Only if you have persistent pain, or if your pain does not respond to these efforts, will your physician consider surgery to relieve the pressure on the affected nerves or on your spinal cord. Here is what you can do:

  • Exercise: Regular exercise can help you build and maintain strength in the muscles of your arms and upper legs. This will help to improve your balance, ability to walk, bend and move about, as well as control pain. A physical therapist will identify and show you what exercises are right for you.
  • Medications: The most common treatment for chronic pain in spinal stenosis is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These include: ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), acetaminophen (Tylenol) and Naproxen (Aleve). Your physician may also prescribe other medications to help with pain and/or muscle spasm.
  • Cortisone injections: Injections directly into the area around the spinal cord (known as epidural injections) may provide a great deal of temporary, sometimes permanent, relief. These medications include: Cortisone (Celestone, Kenalog) and methylprednisolone acetate (Depo-Medrol, Medrol).
  • Surgery: In some cases you may need surgery to relieve spinal stenosis, particularly if a disc fragment is lodged in your spinal canal and is pressing on a nerve, which can cause significant loss of function. Some patients with severe or worsening symptoms (but who are otherwise healthy) may be candidates for what is known as a decompression laminectomy. This surgery removes the bone spurs and buildup of bone in the spinal canal, freeing space for the nerves and the spinal cord. This may be done in conjunction with a spinal fusion to connect two or more vertebrae and better support for the spine. It should be noted that while surgery may bring some relief, it will not cure spinal stenosis and symptoms may recur.

Living With Spinal Stenosis:

Spinal stenosis can be a real challenge day to day, but certain steps can be taken to ease some of the symptoms. Some treatment options include:

  • Get moving. If you’re capable, regular exercise is very important and you should do it often – at least three times a week for about 30 minutes. Start slowly and as you begin to feel stronger, add walking or swimming to your plan.
  • Modify activity. Don’t do anything that can trigger or worsen pain and disability such as lifting heavy objects or walking long distances.
  • Hot or cold packs. Some symptoms of cervical spinal stenosis may be relieved by applying heat or ice to your neck.
  • Canes or walkers. In addition to providing stability, these assistive devices can help relieve pain by allowing you to bend forward while walking.

About Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MD

Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MDDr. Ananthakrishnan trained with one of the pioneers of scoliosis surgery, Dr. David Bradford, at the University of California at San Francisco. After completion of her fellowship, she practiced orthopedic and spine surgery for over three years at the University of Washington in Seattle. In 2007, she left Seattle to work with Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors without Borders in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. She then worked as a volunteer consultant at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, before starting her position at Emory University, where her focus is on adult and adolescent scoliosis.

In 2009, Dr. Ananthakrishnan co-founded Orthopaedic Link, a non-profit dedicated to improving orthopaedic care in the developing world by mobilization of unused implants from the United States. She is also a candidate member of the Scoliosis Research Society. Although Dr. Ananthakrishnan routinely performs complex spinal reconstruction surgery, an injury in 2012 caused her to reevaluate her own approach to musculoskeletal health. Her practice philosophy now focuses on strengthening, stretching and general conditioning as an adjunct to surgical care of her patients.

Related Resources:

Spinal Stenosis: Diagnosis and Symptoms

Spinal StenosisAs the baby boomer population ages, approximately 2.4 million Americans will experience lumbar spinal stenosis by 2021, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases describes spinal stenosis as the narrowing of the spaces in the spine. This results in pressure being applied on the spinal cord and nerve roots. This narrowing condition can happen in three parts of the spine:

  1. The canal in the center of the spinal column, which holds the spinal cord and nerve roots
  2. The canals at the base of nerves that branch out of the spinal cord
  3. The openings between the vertebrae, which the nerves leave through to spread to the rest of the body

Sometimes this narrowing of the space inside the spinal canal produces no symptoms. However, if this places pressure on the spinal cord, cauda equina (a bundle of spinal nerves and nerve roots at the base of the spinal column), or nerve roots, there could be a slow onset and progression of symptoms. The neck or back may or may not hurt. Most often, people suffering from spinal stenosis experience weakness, cramping, numbness or pain in their arms or legs. If the pressure is mainly on a nerve root, they could experience a shooting pain down their leg, also known as sciatica.

If the spinal stenosis is severe, people may have issues with their bowel and bladder function, or even disorders of the foot. Cauda equina syndrome is an extremely rare, but serious form of spinal stenosis, and can cause loss of control of the bowel, bladder, sexual function, and/or loss of feeling, weakness or pain in the legs. This is a serious condition that requires immediate medical attention.

Because of the range of severity and symptoms, it is important to get a proper diagnosis from your doctor. They can use several methods to diagnose spinal stenosis and to rule out other conditions:

  • Questions about your medical history: you may have to explain details about any injuries, conditions or general health problems that could be causing these symptoms.
  • Physical examination: Your doctor will examine you to determine your range of movement, to see if you have pain or other symptoms when you bend backwards, and if you have normal neurologic function (sensation, muscle strength, and reflexes) in your arms and legs.
  • X-Ray: An x-ray of your back may be taken to find signs of an injury, tumor, or other problem. It will show the structure of the vertebrae and if there is any calcification.
  • MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging): An MRI can produce cross-sectional 3D images of your back, and can detect damage or disease of the soft tissues in your spine, and can show enlargement, degeneration or tumors.
  • CAT (Computerized Axial Tomography) Scan: This method can also show cross-sectional and/or 3D images, but can also display the shape and size of the spinal canal, what is in it, and the structures around it.
  • Myelogram: This is a liquid dye that x-rays can’t go through. It is injected into the spinal column and circulates around the spinal cord and nerves, which show up as white on the x-ray film. It can show the doctor if there is any pressure on the spinal cord or nerves from herniated disks, tumors or bone spurs.
  • Bone Scan: Your doctor may inject radioactive material that can attach to bone, especially where the bone is breaking down or being formed. This helps detect fractures, infections, tumors and arthritis (though it’s hard to tell between them). So a bone scan might be done along with other tests.

If you feel any of the symptoms outlined above, contact your doctor for a diagnosis. Though there is no complete cure for this ailment, with the guidance of your physician, steps can be taken to reduce pain and discomfort, and improve flexibility.

About Dr. Howard Levy

Howard Levy, MDDr. Levy is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Levy specializes in non-operative spine care and focuses on helping patients achieve their best functional level. Dr. Levy started practicing at Emory in 1993.

Related Resources

Orthopedics at Emory

8 Types of Low Back Pain that Mean You Should Visit Your Doctor

What is the Sciatic Nerve? What is Sciatica? 

When Does Back Pain Call for an Epidural Steroid Injection? 

90% of Back Problems Can Be Resolved Without Surgery

The thought of having to have spine surgery is terrifying to most people. The good news is that only about 10% of patients who have back or neck problems are candidates for surgery. At Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine, we have non operative as well as operative physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of acute back and neck pain injuries. The non-operative physicians, physiatrists, only recommend surgery in the cases where it is absolutely necessary. There are many non-surgical spine treatment options that may fix back problems before opting for surgery. These non-surgical back treatments include anti –inflammatory medication, ice, heat, gentle massage, physical therapy, orthotics, and injections.

Patients should only consider surgery if all of the conservative treatment options have been exhausted. In this short video below, Emory’s non-operative sports medicine and spine physician, Dr. Oluseun A. Olufade describes Emory’s approach to caring for active individuals with back or neck pain. It is important to note that if your physician immediately suggests you have back surgery before giving you other options for your care, it may be a good idea to get a second opinion.

Related Resources:

About Dr. Olufade
Oluseun Olufade, M.D.Dr. Olufade is board certified in Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team. Dr Olufade is also the team physician for Emory University and Blessed Trinity High School.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports medicine injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in treatment of sports related concussions, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at our clinic at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Dr Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Could Yoga be the Solution for Your Chronic Low Back Pain?

Yoga for Low Back PainIn September, we shared with you some resources on the health benefits of practicing yoga, in honor of Yoga Awareness Month. Make sure to check that resource out, as a new study has recently found that participating in weekly yoga classes is equally as effective as regular deep stretching in relieving symptoms of low back pain. The study, from which findings were published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, followed over 200 people for up to 26 weeks, making it the largest study focusing on yoga’s effect on low back pain.

Of the 228 followed, subjects participated in weekly classes in which they practiced either yoga or deep stretching and also practiced the same thing at home, with the help of instructional CDs 7 DVDs for 20 minutes, at least 3 days a week. The outcomes for the group who practiced yoga and the group who practiced deep stretching in classes were compared to a “control” group, whose members were given a book with tips and best practices for relieving chronic low back pain. The results of the study showed that both yoga and deep stretching were equally as useful in easing or relieving low back pain, as long as either the yoga or stretching were practiced regularly.

Couple these results with the fact that 80% of people will suffer from low back pain at some point in their lives with the fact that Americans spend at least $50 billion each year on low back pain 1 and it becomes obvious that yoga could evolve to be an easy and fairly cost-effective method for alleviating chronic low back pain with potential to be as beneficial for improving pain as it is for reducing stress and improving flexibility and breathing.

Has your low back pain been improved by practicing yoga? If so, we’d love to hear from you in the comments below!

Can Osteoarthritis Be Prevented?

preventing osteoarthritisIf you’re starting to feel the twinges of pain or stiffness in your joints or spine, you may be wondering what’s causing it and whether you can prevent it from getting worse. One common contributor to joint and spine pain is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease that is caused by degeneration of the cartilage, the cushiony substance between the bones, and if severe, it can then affect the bone itself. Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the weight-bearing joints (hips, knees, and spine).

The chance of developing arthritis increases with age. Although some people may have it as early as their 20s and 30s, it is more likely to develop osteoarthritis in your 50 and 60s and older. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, so prevention is the key. There are some risk factors that you can’t change, such as your genes (heredity) and your age. The goal is to decrease risk factors that you do have control over to help prevent osteoarthritis. These include:

  • Weight – obesity increases risk of arthritis
  • Trauma
  • Performing repetitive-motion tasks over a long period of time
  • Weaksurrounding muscles

The same factors that will help you prevent osteoarthritis can also help treat the pain and discomfort from osteoarthritis. Extra weight puts a strain on your joints, so try to keep your weight in a healthy range or lose weight if you’re not in that range. If you’re not sure what a healthy range is for you, check with your doctor. Also, keeping your muscles strong can help decrease the weight on your joints. If pain occurs while you’re doing an activity, listen to your body and decrease your intensity. Bear in mind that repetitive activities can cause joint pain and stiffness. Repetitive activities might include working on the computer or repeated bending or lifting. Try to find other ways of performing daily activities and be sure to take frequent breaks.

If you’re experiencing ongoing or increasing pain and stiffness, it may be time to see one of the physicians at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center for further evaluation and treatment.

Emory physiatrists are physicians specially trained in rehabilitation and pain management. Our physiatrists can work with you to develop a plan that includes daily strengthening and stretching exercises to reduce pain and stiffness. Because osteoarthritis can occur in different areas of your body, you want a plan designed to target the affected joint or joints. Your physician may suggest formal therapy or bracing the joint to help ease pain. Finally, your doctor can suggest an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication or prescribe medication to help with the pain if needed.

Do you have osteoarthritis? What do you do to ease the pain and stiffness? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

Dr. Diana SodiqAbout Diana Sodiq, DO:
Diana Sodiq, DO, is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry). As an osteopathic physician, Dr. Sodiq is trained in both traditional medicine as well as osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT). She started practicing at Emory in 2010.

When Does Back Pain Call for an Epidural Steroid Injection?

Back pain epidural steroid injectionAs a physiatrist at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, I diagnose and treat back pain non-operatively, and one of the questions I’m asked most often by patients is whether they’re candidates for an epidural steroid injection.

If you have spinal pain, whether in your neck or back, your doctor will ask you whether it’s axial pain or radicular pain. Axial pain does not radiate into the arms or legs—it’s localized in one area. Radicular pain does radiate into the arms or legs. Axial pain typically is treated conservatively, with pain medication and exercise, and does not benefit from an epidural injection. However, if you have radicular pain and conservative measures haven’t helped, you may be a candidate for an epidural steroid injection.

In most cases, radicular pain is caused by one of two conditions—a herniated disc or spinal stenosis. Herniation is when a piece of the disc becomes disclocated, or slips, and presses on a nerve. This is more common among middle-aged patients, and 80% of patients with a herniated disc will get better over time without intervention. Disc herniations shrink as the body naturally self-heals. However, an epidural steroid injection can ease the pain and make the healing process more comfortable.

Spinal stenosis usually is caused by the natural wear and tear on the spine that comes with aging. Most patients with stenosis are 65 or older. Stenosis is degenerative and can lead to spinal nerve root compression or bony stenosis, which can cause pain, numbness, and weakness. While spinal stenosis may eventually require surgery, an epidural steroid injection can be a good temporary measure if you’re not quite ready for surgery or are not a candidate.

At Emory, we used different injection techniques depending on the condition. An interlaminar epidural is similar to the epidural a pregnant woman may opt for before giving birth. In this case, the goal is to introduce the steroid around the nerve root to decrease inflammation, which, in turn, eases pain. A transforaminal epidural is a more selective injection in which we target a specific nerve root that may be compressed by a herniated disc or a bone spur. Your doctor will decide which technique will benefit you.

In most cases if you have back or neck pain, your first step should be to try conservative pain-relief measures. However, when pain medication and exercise don’t help, and you’re suffering from radiating pain, an epidural steroid injection may be a good solution. An Emory physiatrist can work with you to diagnose your pain and set you on the right course of treatment.

Have you had an epidural steroid injection for back pain? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below. If you’re interested in learning more, we have some great information on epidural steroid injections for back pain our website.

About Susan Dreyer, MD:

Dr. Dreyer is an Associate Professor in the departments of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Dreyer specializes in non-operative spine care and focuses on helping patients achieve their best functional level. She has taught many national and international courses on spine care and spinal injections for sciatica and other causes of back and neck problems.  She is also active in several professional societies. Dr. Dreyer started practicing at Emory in 1992.