Posts Tagged ‘Emory Spine Center’

3 Cervical Spine Procedures that Reduce Recovery Times

John G. Heller, MDWhen people think about neck conditions requiring surgery, they usually think about cervical spine injuries. We’ve all seen those tense moments during football or other sports when a player is injured and lies motionless on the field. A dramatic example comes from a Boston Celtics basketball game back in February, when Marquis Daniels bumped into another player and then fell motionless to the floor.

Fortunately, these events are rare. Most cervical spine surgery is needed because of wear and tear that affects your discs over time. In younger adults, this tends to be a herniated disc, which compresses the nerve roots or spinal cord. And, as we age, we all develop bone spurs to varying degrees (the “gray hair of the neck”). These spurs can be a source of nerve root or spinal cord compression, as well.

Cervical spine procedures are typically performed through the front of the neck, or anteriorly. In the United States, the primary surgical technique for the past 50 years has been the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Since bone spurs form at the margins of the discs as they degenerate, these operations involve a discectomy, or the removal of the entire cervical disc, plus any bone spurs that border the discs.

Over the last two decades, spine surgeons at Emory have been leading the way in performing several innovative cervical spine procedures: laminoforaminotomy, artificial cervical disc, and laminoplasty. These procedures are performed from the back, or posteriorly, and don’t require a spinal fusion, thereby allowing patients to retain range of motion in the neck and also get back to their normal activities more quickly.

How do surgeons at Emory determine if one of these procedures might be right for you?

The first, laminoforaminotomy, is reserved for disc herniations that sit far enough to the side of the spinal canal that they do not compress the spinal cord. This procedure has been performed for many years, but new technology is allowing it to now be done using a minimally invasive microsurgical technique.

The second, for patients who meet the right selection criteria, is an artificial cervical disc, which may be inserted in place of the traditional bone graft with a plate and screws. This artificial disc is a moving part that’s ready for use when the patient wakes from anesthesia. Essentially, this procedure is a “get up and go” operation that avoids most of the limitations we traditionally impose on fusion patients while they heal. The artificial cervical disc is a ground-breaking option that has been very successful in clinical trials, many of which took place at Emory. Like any novel technology, longer term follow-up is needed to fully assess the risks and benefits of artificial cervical discs. But the data thus far are quite promising.

The third procedure, laminoplasty, is most often used in patients who are older and have three or more levels of spinal cord compression that would usually take three or four fusions. During this procedure, which is performed from the back of the neck, the roof of the spinal canal is re-shaped to provide more room for the spinal cord without the need for fusion. A mini-plate device, developed by surgeons at Emory Spine Center, is used during this procedure – allowing patients to move their necks right away after surgery, speeding up rehabilitation.

If you have been told you need cervical spine surgery, I would encourage you to contact the Emory Spine Center for an appointment to learn more about these innovative procedures.

Have you had or are you going to have cervical spine surgery? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

About John G. Heller, MD:
John G. Heller, MD, Baur Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and spine fellowship director, specializes in the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, including disc arthroplasty and laminoplasty plates. He is the past-president of the Cervical Spine Research Society. Dr. Heller started practicing at Emory in 1989.

As an Academic Medical Center, Emory Provides Superior Spine Care

Dr. Scott BodenI am often asked questions like “Will YOU actually be doing my surgery?” and “Does a teaching hospital mean someone will be practicing surgery on my back?” These questions made me realize that many patients don’t understand what it means to receive care in an academic medical center, so I thought I would try to explain this in more detail.

Most of the differences in a true academic medical center, especially for a spine center, represent benefits that the patient may not even realize. First, to be a physician at an academic medical center, the surgeon also must be a professor, usually in a School of Medicine. As part of the medical school faculty, these physicians, in addition to taking care of patients, are teaching surgical techniques to the future generation of surgeons and/or performing research that is allowing for new discoveries and advancements in the field. This means that patients are exposed to the latest advances in surgical techniques and technology.

In addition, because of the teaching process, the patient will likely have a second MD assisting (helping retract and hold tissues), rather than just one surgeon and a nurse or surgical assistant. I would liken it to a pilot and co-pilot flying an airplane. Spine surgery is serious business, with little room for error, so you can rest assured that at any reputable academic center (such as Emory), the key portions of the surgery will be performed by your surgeon.

A second benefit comes from the collaborative environment in a multidisciplinary spine center. At the Emory Spine Center, one of the largest in the U.S., there are physical medicine/rehabilitation, occupational medicine, psychology, orthopaedic surgery, and neurological surgery physicians all seeing patients side by side every day. This spectrum of physicians ensures that no matter what a patient’s spine problem may be, he or she is sure to find a true expert among the staff. This environment takes the worry away from the patient about which type of specialist to see.

All of the surgical and nonsurgical physicians working at the Emory Spine Center have been fellowship trained (which means they’ve received extra training to specialize in spine care) and spend the majority of their clinical practice diagnosing and treating only patients with spine problems. This level of sub-specialization is harder to find outside an academic center. In addition, academic medical centers usually have the resources to have the latest and highest quality imaging technology—which is also very helpful in spine care.

A third benefit comes from the fact that some of the toughest cases are referred to academic centers. As a result, these physicians have more experience with the toughest problems and rarest complications, so that in the unlikely event you do experience a complication, they are very comfortable diagnosing and managing it to minimize any long-term impact on your outcome.

Most of these and other advantages of an academic medical center typically go on behind the scenes, which is probably why so few people truly understand the difference.

How have you benefitted from spine treatment in an academic medical center? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

About Dr. Boden
Scott D. Boden, MD, Director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, is an internationally renowned surgeon, lecturer, and teacher and the driving force behind the Emory University Orthopedics and Spine Hospital (EUOSH). Dr. Boden started practicing at Emory in 1992.

Introducing the Emory Orthopedic Blog

Welcome to the Emory Healthcare Orthopedic blog—a hub for all topics related to Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, and Spine Care.

Our multi-media blog will feature forum discussions, patient stories, educational material and coverage of exciting new technological advancements.  Most importantly, it will feature you—and your thoughts, questions, and opinions.

We’re very excited about this opportunity to connect with you, and we look forward to entering conversations with you surrounding Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, and Spine Care.

We’ll kick off the blog with a post by Forest Pecha, the Director of Athletic Training Services at Emory Sports Medicine. Forest will provide coverage and commentary on the Tour De France and touch on common injuries associated with cycling.

Again, we welcome your interaction and look forward to hearing from you!