Posts Tagged ‘Emory Spine Center’

8 Tips to Fix Your Posture at Work

Good PostureFor the average working American, it is common to sit a minimum of eight hours a day and a majority of that behind a computer. I frequently see patients with neck and back pain that are not related to a specific injury, but rather from spending many hours at their desk (which usually involves using a computer). Sitting for extended periods of time can lead to a variety of health issues, including fatigue, muscle and joint pain.

Do you spend a lot of time behind a desk? If so, make sure your chair and work station are set up to fit you properly and influence good posture. Here are a few tips to help get you started:

  1. MONITOR POSITION: You should be able to sit straight in front of your computer and not have to turn from side to side to access it. The top half of the monitor should be in line with your eye height.
  2. DISTANCE FROM MONITOR: Keep your arms and elbows close to your body and parallel to the floor. You should not have to reach forward to use your keyboard. (Tip: try sitting about 18 inches from your computer screen).
  3. NECK: People who spend a lot of time on the phone often complain of neck pain. If you find yourself cradling your phone between your shoulder and chin so you can type and talk at the same time, switch to a headset or use a speaker phone. Also, be careful to not protrude your neck forward while looking at the computer screen. (Tip: Try keeping your ear in line with your shoulder)
  4. SHOULDERS: Keep your shoulders down and relaxed.
  5. BACK: Sit with your back pushed to the back of the chair with some form of lower back support between you and the chair back.
  6. ELBOWS and WRISTS: While typing, elbows should be at a 90-degree angle from your body, and your wrists and hands should be in a straight line. Make sure not to place stress on your wrists – keep them in a neutral position, not arched or bent. (Tip: Have the keyboard and mouse near each other and at the same height as your elbows).
  7. LEGS: When you’re sitting, your hips/thighs should be parallel to the ground or a little higher than your knees. Also, you don’t want the end of chair hitting the back of your knees—make sure to leave a little gap.
  8. FEET: Feet should touch the ground and lay flat on the floor. Sitting cross-legged or on one leg can lead to slouching. (Tip: if your feet cannot touch the floor, try using a footrest or box.)

Remember to give yourself breaks after you have been sitting for an extended period of time. Get up and move around regularly throughout the day, in fact, for every hour your work at your desk, give yourself several 1-2 minute breaks. Take a quick walk around the office, grab some water, chat with a coworker, or at least stand up and stretch.

I always tell my patients to listen to their body. If you are having pain, your body is trying to send you a message. If you experience neck or back pain that does not improve after trying the tips above, make an appointment with an Emory Spine physiatrist for further evaluation and treatment. To make an appointment, please call 404-778-3350 to speak to a member of our team.

About Diana Sodiq, DO

Dr. Diana SodiqDiana Sodiq, DO, is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry). As an osteopathic physician, Dr. Sodiq is trained in both traditional medicine as well as osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT). She started practicing at Emory in 2010.


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Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

“I’m a Medical Miracle!” : One Emory Spine Center Patient’s Experience

Andy ReynoldsBy Andy Reynolds, Emory Spine Center Patient 

In midsummer of 2010, my riding lawn mower flipped over and pinned me underneath. My back was broken in three parts. I had surgery to fuse and implant rods and screws. My pain never went away, so later I had the rods and screws removed in hopes of pain relief.

My pain worsened and more issues developed within the next four years. My nerves were damaged which lead to horrific pain, migraines, insomnia, and I developed Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. I could hardly make it through a day at work, I wore a brace and had seen about 16 different doctors before I was referred to a spine specialist. That spine specialist was my medical miracle doctor, Emory neurosurgeon, Dr. Gerald Rodts.

Dr. Rodts showed me a CT scan image of my spine and surprisingly revealed that my fracture was never repaired, and therefore, never properly healed. Dr. Rodts was in disbelief that I was not paralyzed since my back was still broken.

I had spine surgery November 24, 2014 at Emory University Hospital Midtown. During my surgery, Dr. Rodts worked his magic and reconstructed the damaged area of my spine so my nerves were no longer pinched.

Today, I don’t have a single issue left from my incident and my life has changed drastically. I went from enduring a multitude of health issues, including horrific pain, to being completely healthy and happy. Since my spine surgery, I can stand longer now, travel and go in the pool. I am able to participate in activities I enjoy like outdoor planting and am looking forward to yard work and even getting back on my lawn mower come Spring. I also cannot wait to get back to lifting weights at the gym.

When I look back at photos of me, I can see how bad of a shape I was in by the pained look on my face. My medical miracle would not have happened if it hadn’t been for Dr. Rodts and the spine team at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Everyone was wonderful; it was like a five star experience.

A note from Dr. Gerald Rodts, Jr.

Andy had originally suffered a severe fracture of the lumbar vertebra, at a crucial transition area between his lower thoracic spine and upper lumbar spine. Despite having had surgery to stabilize the fracture, it ultimately never healed. It became a source of chronic, severe back pain. In order to fix the problem, the surgery required a different approach.

The surgery was done with cardiothoracic surgeon, Allen Pickens, MD. With the help of Dr. Pickens, an incision was made on the chest wall (flank) on the left side. A rib was removed, and the large diaphragm muscle disconnected from the spine. The fracture pieces of vertebra were removed, and the spine was rebuilt with a titanium fusion cage, rib bone graft, and two screws and a rod. The diaphragm muscle was reconnected, and the chest wall closed. This procedure renders the spine immediately strong and stable, and the area of the fracture then continues to strengthen as the bone graft heals.

To learn more about the wide range of spine conditions treated at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, click here or call 404-778-3350.

About Dr. Rodts

Gerald Rodts, MDGerald E. Rodts, Jr., MD,  is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. In addition, he is the Director of the Spine Fellowship Program in the Department of Neurosurgery at The Emory Spine Center and Chief of Neurosurgery Spine Service at The Emory Clinic.

Dr. Rodts graduated from Princeton University with a degree in biology and a Certificate of Study of Science in Human Affairs. He received his M.D. from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and completed his neurosurgery residency training at the University of California in Los Angeles, followed by a 1-year fellowship in complex spinal neurosurgery at Emory University. Dr. Rodts has served as the President of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons as well as serving as the Secretary. He has also served as the Chairman of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves. He is also a founding editor of the award-winning website, Spine Universe. He has been selected as one of the Castle and Connelley’s “Top Doc” neurosurgeons in the United States ten years in a row and has received a similar distinction in Atlanta Magazine annually. He is a neurotrauma consultant to the National Football League.

Dr. Rodts manages patients with spinal disorders, and specializes in neoplastic, rheumatoid, degenerative, traumatic spinal disorders, syringomyelia and Chiari malformations. His research interests are in computer-assisted, image-guided surgery and minimally-invasive spinal techniques.

Areas of Clinical Interest:

  • Complex spine surgery and reconstruction
  • Computer-assisted image-guided spine surgery
  • Minimally-invasive spine surgery
  • Revision spinal surgery

Emory Spine Center Patient: “Dr. Ananthakrishnan is a miracle worker.”

By Renee Godley, patient at Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine Center

Emory Orthopedics PatientIn 1969, I had scoliosis surgery. During this surgery, my spine was fused and a Harington Rod was attached to the muscles in my spine. After the surgery, I was bedridden for six months and in a body casts for a total of nine months. I recovered well and learned how to live with my limitations.

In 1990, I started to suffer from lower back pain. I visited Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine Center, in Atlanta, Georgia and I was informed that I needed to have additional surgery. The wear and tear on my lower three discs had progressed to the point that I would need to have them replaced and fused within 10 years. I said no immediately because I knew the process, I had a three year old daughter at home and I would again, be bedridden for three months and in a body cast that extended down to my right knee. I was unwilling to go through the process a second time. Fear lead me to that decision.

From 2007 until 2012 I saw a pain management orthopedist, which helped me to numb the pain. Then I was advised to see Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine physician, Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MD. Fear once again took hold of me. I had done research and quickly realized I was suffering from Flat Back Syndrome. I read information about the surgeries (two, for a total of at least 12 hours), and started to panic. I finally reached the point where the pain was too much and I just couldn’t take it anymore. I did not want to have surgery and I did not know what to do.

My life had become very restrictive. I could no longer go out to eat or even sit on the living room couch for an extended period of time, rather I had to lie down to lessen the pressure on my spine. I loved attending Georgia football games and could no longer attend any games, the car ride, walk to the stadium and sitting in the stands were beyond my capabilities. I just could not go anymore. My husband wanted to go to the movies, and you guessed it, I could not; I couldn’t do anything.

After much fear, unbearable pain and many days and nights spent crying, my life would soon change. I was referred to Emory Spine Center to see Dr. Ananthakrishnan (Doctor A). Doctor A examined me and ran numerous tests and the diagnosis was, as predicted, Flat Back Syndrome. Although I did not want to have the surgeries, I had no choice. I was scheduled for surgery in December of 2012. For thirty days I was taken off my medications (anti-inflammatories) and realized just how disabled I had become. I was immobile, I couldn’t walk, much less do anything.

On, December 7, 2012, I had surgery at Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital with Dr. Ananthakrishnan that included three replacement discs. A second surgery was held on December 11, 2012 where two rods and 16 one inch titanium screws were placed in my back.

Thanks to Dr. Ananthakrishnan, for the first time in 30 years, I had no pain in my back! This is the best feeling that I’ve felt since I met my husband and got married. Dr. A is a miracle worker. In the two years since my surgery I have begun to walk for exercise, averaging approximately five miles of exercise per day. I went from not walking at all to averaging over 70,000 steps per week.

Everyone I see can’t believe how good I look. I stand straight. I am no longer hunched over. When someone tells me they are experiencing back pain, the first thing I ask them is, “Have you gone to Emory yet?” I would not have the quality of life I have today without Dr. Ananthakrishnan.

A note from Dr. Dheera Ananthakrishnan

I vividly remember the first day that I met Mrs. Godley. She was still so traumatized from her scoliosis surgery all those years ago! I was very worried that she would have difficulty coping with such a large revision surgery. Was I ever wrong! She sailed through two really large surgeries, and has been a textbook patient, inspiring others to follow in her footsteps.

One of the great joys of performing surgery is to see how life-altering it can be for patients who have lived with disability and pain for a long time. Mrs. Godley embodies this for me. It has been my great pleasure to know her and care for her. Now the only tears that are shed during our visits are tears of joy.

About Dr. Ananthakrishnan

Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MDDheera Ananthakrishnan, MD, trained with one of the pioneers of scoliosis surgery, Dr. David Bradford, at the University of California at San Francisco. After completion of her fellowship, Dr. Ananthakrishnan practiced orthopedic and spine surgery for over three years at the University of Washington in Seattle. In 2007, she left Seattle to work with Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. She then worked as a volunteer consultant at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, before starting her position at Emory University. She maintains an interest in developing-world orthopedics through her non-profit, Orthopaedic Link, and is currently involved in projects in the Philippines, Nepal, and Bulgaria.

Dr. Ananthakrishnan’s practice focuses on adult scoliosis and degenerative conditions. She also treats adolescent spinal disorders as well as tumors and cervical conditions. She has been at the Emory Orthopaedic and Spine Center since 2007.

3 Cervical Spine Procedures that Reduce Recovery Times

John G. Heller, MDWhen people think about neck conditions requiring surgery, they usually think about cervical spine injuries. We’ve all seen those tense moments during football or other sports when a player is injured and lies motionless on the field. A dramatic example comes from a Boston Celtics basketball game back in February, when Marquis Daniels bumped into another player and then fell motionless to the floor.

Fortunately, these events are rare. Most cervical spine surgery is needed because of wear and tear that affects your discs over time. In younger adults, this tends to be a herniated disc, which compresses the nerve roots or spinal cord. And, as we age, we all develop bone spurs to varying degrees (the “gray hair of the neck”). These spurs can be a source of nerve root or spinal cord compression, as well.

Cervical spine procedures are typically performed through the front of the neck, or anteriorly. In the United States, the primary surgical technique for the past 50 years has been the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Since bone spurs form at the margins of the discs as they degenerate, these operations involve a discectomy, or the removal of the entire cervical disc, plus any bone spurs that border the discs.

Over the last two decades, spine surgeons at Emory have been leading the way in performing several innovative cervical spine procedures: laminoforaminotomy, artificial cervical disc, and laminoplasty. These procedures are performed from the back, or posteriorly, and don’t require a spinal fusion, thereby allowing patients to retain range of motion in the neck and also get back to their normal activities more quickly.

How do surgeons at Emory determine if one of these procedures might be right for you?

The first, laminoforaminotomy, is reserved for disc herniations that sit far enough to the side of the spinal canal that they do not compress the spinal cord. This procedure has been performed for many years, but new technology is allowing it to now be done using a minimally invasive microsurgical technique.

The second, for patients who meet the right selection criteria, is an artificial cervical disc, which may be inserted in place of the traditional bone graft with a plate and screws. This artificial disc is a moving part that’s ready for use when the patient wakes from anesthesia. Essentially, this procedure is a “get up and go” operation that avoids most of the limitations we traditionally impose on fusion patients while they heal. The artificial cervical disc is a ground-breaking option that has been very successful in clinical trials, many of which took place at Emory. Like any novel technology, longer term follow-up is needed to fully assess the risks and benefits of artificial cervical discs. But the data thus far are quite promising.

The third procedure, laminoplasty, is most often used in patients who are older and have three or more levels of spinal cord compression that would usually take three or four fusions. During this procedure, which is performed from the back of the neck, the roof of the spinal canal is re-shaped to provide more room for the spinal cord without the need for fusion. A mini-plate device, developed by surgeons at Emory Spine Center, is used during this procedure – allowing patients to move their necks right away after surgery, speeding up rehabilitation.

If you have been told you need cervical spine surgery, I would encourage you to contact the Emory Spine Center for an appointment to learn more about these innovative procedures.

Have you had or are you going to have cervical spine surgery? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

About John G. Heller, MD:
John G. Heller, MD, Baur Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and spine fellowship director, specializes in the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, including disc arthroplasty and laminoplasty plates. He is the past-president of the Cervical Spine Research Society. Dr. Heller started practicing at Emory in 1989.

As an Academic Medical Center, Emory Provides Superior Spine Care

Dr. Scott BodenI am often asked questions like “Will YOU actually be doing my surgery?” and “Does a teaching hospital mean someone will be practicing surgery on my back?” These questions made me realize that many patients don’t understand what it means to receive care in an academic medical center, so I thought I would try to explain this in more detail.

Most of the differences in a true academic medical center, especially for a spine center, represent benefits that the patient may not even realize. First, to be a physician at an academic medical center, the surgeon also must be a professor, usually in a School of Medicine. As part of the medical school faculty, these physicians, in addition to taking care of patients, are teaching surgical techniques to the future generation of surgeons and/or performing research that is allowing for new discoveries and advancements in the field. This means that patients are exposed to the latest advances in surgical techniques and technology.

In addition, because of the teaching process, the patient will likely have a second MD assisting (helping retract and hold tissues), rather than just one surgeon and a nurse or surgical assistant. I would liken it to a pilot and co-pilot flying an airplane. Spine surgery is serious business, with little room for error, so you can rest assured that at any reputable academic center (such as Emory), the key portions of the surgery will be performed by your surgeon.

A second benefit comes from the collaborative environment in a multidisciplinary spine center. At the Emory Spine Center, one of the largest in the U.S., there are physical medicine/rehabilitation, occupational medicine, psychology, orthopaedic surgery, and neurological surgery physicians all seeing patients side by side every day. This spectrum of physicians ensures that no matter what a patient’s spine problem may be, he or she is sure to find a true expert among the staff. This environment takes the worry away from the patient about which type of specialist to see.

All of the surgical and nonsurgical physicians working at the Emory Spine Center have been fellowship trained (which means they’ve received extra training to specialize in spine care) and spend the majority of their clinical practice diagnosing and treating only patients with spine problems. This level of sub-specialization is harder to find outside an academic center. In addition, academic medical centers usually have the resources to have the latest and highest quality imaging technology—which is also very helpful in spine care.

A third benefit comes from the fact that some of the toughest cases are referred to academic centers. As a result, these physicians have more experience with the toughest problems and rarest complications, so that in the unlikely event you do experience a complication, they are very comfortable diagnosing and managing it to minimize any long-term impact on your outcome.

Most of these and other advantages of an academic medical center typically go on behind the scenes, which is probably why so few people truly understand the difference.

How have you benefitted from spine treatment in an academic medical center? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

About Dr. Boden
Scott D. Boden, MD, Director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, is an internationally renowned surgeon, lecturer, and teacher and the driving force behind the Emory University Orthopedics and Spine Hospital (EUOSH). Dr. Boden started practicing at Emory in 1992.

Introducing the Emory Orthopedic Blog

Welcome to the Emory Healthcare Orthopedic blog—a hub for all topics related to Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, and Spine Care.

Our multi-media blog will feature forum discussions, patient stories, educational material and coverage of exciting new technological advancements.  Most importantly, it will feature you—and your thoughts, questions, and opinions.

We’re very excited about this opportunity to connect with you, and we look forward to entering conversations with you surrounding Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, and Spine Care.

We’ll kick off the blog with a post by Forest Pecha, the Director of Athletic Training Services at Emory Sports Medicine. Forest will provide coverage and commentary on the Tour De France and touch on common injuries associated with cycling.

Again, we welcome your interaction and look forward to hearing from you!