Posts Tagged ‘emory orthopaedics and spine center’

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center Welcomes Dr. Lisa Foster

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center welcomes a new non-operative spine physician, Lisa Foster, MD, to its Johns Creek practice. Foster joins Kyle Hammond, MD; Neeru Jayanthi, MD; Scott Maughon, MD; Oluseun Olufade, MD; Mathew Pombo, MD; and Richard Thomas, MD at the clinic located at 6335 Hospital Parkway in Johns Creek.

“Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center now has 23 physicians specializing in the diagnosis and management of spinal disorders ranging from the most simple herniated disc or back sprain, to the most complicated scoliosis deformities or spine tumors,” says Scott D. Boden, MD, director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center.

Foster is a board certified, fellowship trained interventional physiatrist. She has extensive training in minimally invasive, fluoroscopic guided procedures for the treatment of various spinal disorders.

“We’re confident Dr. Foster will strengthen the presence of the Emory Spine Center at our Johns Creek location to make world class spine care more accessible for patients north of the metro Atlanta area,” says Boden.

Foster says she looks forward to working with patients in Johns Creek and surrounding areas to improve their quality of life and help them meet their healthcare needs.

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center has also added six new exam rooms to serve more patients.

About Dr. Lisa Foster

Lisa Foster, MD, is a board certified, fellowship trained interventional physiatrist, specializing in non-operative spine care.

A native of Wichita, KS, she received her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at the University of Kansas and her medical degree from the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Dr. Foster completed both her residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and her subspecialty fellowship training in Interventional Pain Medicine at Emory University Hospital.

Dr. Foster has published numerous articles and presented at national conferences in the fields of spine and rehabilitation medicine. Most recently, she was a contributing author for a book chapter on the workup and conservative management of lumbar degenerative disk disease in JL Pinherio-Franco’s Advanced Concepts in Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease.

Dr. Foster employs a comprehensive, multi-modal approach for the treatment of spinal conditions with the goal of optimizing function and improving the quality of life of her patients. She has extensive training in minimally invasive, fluoroscopic guided procedures for the treatment of various spine disorders.

Outside of medicine, Dr. Foster enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and hiking in remote parts of globe.

Hip and Knee Replacement Live Chat: December 13, 2016

joint-replacement260x200Are you or someone you know considering hip or knee replacement after living with pain for an extended time? Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have decided to undergo hip or knee replacement surgery, we can help answer your questions about the procedure and recovery time.

Join us on Tuesday, December 13 at 12 PM EST for a live chat with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Thomas Bradbury of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Learn more about new treatment options and whether total joint replacement surgery is right for you. Register here today.

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About Dr. Bradbury

Thomas Bradbury, MDThomas Bradbury, MD, enjoys hip and knee arthroplasty because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

Scoliosis Spine Surgery- Patient Success Story

Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine with multiple symptoms. Surgical treatment of scoliosis usually requires a spinal fusion. About 5 years ago, I had back surgery with John Rhee, MD at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Rhee removed pressure off of nerves in my back and joined two back bones together. Following that procedure, everything was fine. I knew at the time that I had a scoliosis that might eventually need to be addressed, but the decision was made to do the smallest operation first and just take care of the area that was causing the pain. Low and behold, the scoliosis did eventually catch up with me, and I started to experience sciatic pain from my buttock to ankle several times throughout the day. I was working, but I was taking medications to mask the pain just so I could go to work. I could not do anything else because I did not want to agitate my back.

Prior to suggesting surgery, Dr. Rhee recommended trying to rehab my back to see if a nonoperative approach would help. However, after trying, it became obvious that nonoperative treatment was not working, and that surgery would be the best option for me. About a month and half before surgery I was given exercises to complete which would end up helping me after surgery. I thought this was unique and the medical team was right, because I would not be able to rehab immediately post-surgery. I was preparing for after surgery before I even went into surgery.

During surgery, my wife was in the waiting room and she was updated on my status by the hour. Due to my severe scoliosis, it was a major fusion operation involving multiple levels from the thoracic spine down to the sacrum. However, the Orthopaedics and Spine team made her feel very comfortable. I was in the hospital for a total of 2 days, came home on the 3rd day and started my recovery. From Dr. Rhee’s nurse, Betty Dundee, to the staff, my experience was great!

Prior to me going to Dr. Rhee, I had a fraternity brother, who is an Orthopedic surgeon, take a look at my x-ray before surgery and he viewed it after surgery as well. My friend could not believe what a great job Dr. Rhee did. He said “You got a good guy!”. All of my friends call me wonder man because they can’t believe I can do what I’m doing based on seeing me beforehand. For example, my wife and another person watched me walk down the pavement to make sure I had proper form, and I did! Dr. Rhee did a great job. Even though I needed a major operation, the surgery seemed so easy and well done. I cannot see someone not going through surgery because I found it so simple. I’m very pleased and I’m on my feet once again.

A Note From Dr. Rhee About Scoliosis and Spine Surgery

Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that can lead to nerve compression, pain, and if severe enough, deformity. Surgical treatment of scoliosis usually requires a spinal fusion. Depending on the magnitude of the scoliosis, multiple levels in the spine may require fusion, which can make it a major operation. Nevertheless, when properly executed, surgery for scoliosis is associated with excellent outcomes.

About Dr. Rhee

Dr. John Rhee, Orthopedist AtlantaSpecializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis), and surgery for spinal tumors, Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies.  He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery.  In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings.   Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and book chapters, and he has received numerous awards and honors.  He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of numerous books on spine surgery techniques.

Concussions in Young Athletes – Live Chat on August 9, 2016

concussion260x200Is the peewee football phase too early to wonder about concussions? Maybe not. Concussion rates are rising sharply among U.S. kids and teens, researchers report, and concussion diagnoses more than doubled between 2007 and 2014. According to the CDC, more than 248,000 U.S. children and teens land in the emergency room each year because of a concussion sustained in sports or recreational activities, such as bicycling, football, basketball, soccer and from playground injuries.

If you have a young child or a student athlete who is participating in sports and want to learn more about how to prevent, detect and treat concussions, join us on Tuesday, August 9 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. for a live online chat to discuss the topic. Our host is Dr. Jeffrey Webb, pediatric sports medicine physician at Emory Sports Medicine Center. Dr. Webb will also discuss the laws that Georgia has passed targeting concussion in high school and younger athletes.

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About Dr. Webb

webb-jeffreyDr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. During his training and practice he has provided medical coverage for division I college football and other sports, multiple high schools, ballet, the Rockettes, marathons, international track and field events, and the Special Olympics. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons and is also a consulting physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College and many other club sports teams.

He is active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

ACL Injury: Mikayla’s Success Story

Mikayla CoombsIn November of 2015, my daughter Mikayla Coombs had a rough start to her basketball season. Mikayla is the number one basketball player in the state of Georgia and the sudden injury came as a surprise. Mikayla was playing in a tournament at Norcross High School and fell during the game. She was not in any pain after falling on the court so the athletic trainer checked her and said she could return to play. After getting back on the court to play, she fell again and was told that she had a lateral collateral ligament (LCL) strain. The next day we had an appointment to see the team doctor without having any testing done and it was confirmed that she had an ACL injury.

After the doctor’s visit we were sent to have an MRI taken of Mikayla’s leg. The results came back around thanksgiving and the news was not good. Mikayla had an ACL tear. At that point, as a mother of a great athlete, I had no clue of what I was going to do. I had tears in my eyes. Mikayla received an invite to the USA trial scheduled for June and was not able to attend because of her injury and scheduled surgery. However, Mikayla was never sad, nor did she complain.

I’ve always heard positive feedback in the community about sports medicine physicians at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and decided to make an appointment for Mikayla. Mikayla had a successful surgery with Spero Karas, MD on December 31st. 2015. Dr. Karas went above and beyond to help her. After Mikayla’s surgery, she was in minimal pain and hardly needed any of the medications prescribed. Surprisingly, Mikayla was also doing pushups, she was able to sleep and shower with no assistance. Two days later she had her follow-up appointment and she was able to walk into the clinic. She was determined and felt good enough to not have to use her crutches.

It has been an amazing journey. Mikayla got back on her own without a brace and everyone that knows Mikayla has been impressed with her speedy recovery time. Mikayla continues to go to physical therapy with The Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and at her high school with an athletic trainer. She is doing wonderful and the good thing is that nothing has changed in terms of opportunities for my daughter and in athletics. Before she had multiple offers to UConn, Stanford, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia, Penn State, Tennessee etc. , and now those offers are still coming in. Mikayla has a very small scar. It’s been a blessing and I cannot thank Dr. Karas enough. He was very adamant about not allowing Mikayla back on the court until she was in the correct stage of rehab and only allowed court privileges when appropriate. Dr. Karas treated her as if it were his own daughter that got injured.

Several of Mikayla’s team members have had surgery with other offices and compared to Mikayla’s small scar, it’s unbelievable. Mikayla often gets questions on whether or not, she really had surgery.

According to Mikayla “Everything happens for a reason and if Dr. Karas is taking care of any patient, they’ll be alright and are in good hands.”

Mikayla has won: 
AJC 2A Player of the year
METRO ATLANTA PLAYER OF THE YEAR
REGION PLAYER OF THE YEAR
ALLSTAR-MVP
USA TODAY Georgia First Team
USA TRYOUTS INVITE

Thank you to Dr. Karas and the team at the Emory Orthopaedics, & Spine Center!

A note from Dr. Karas:

The surgery I performed on Mikayla was an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction using a hamstring tendon from the back of her thigh. The hamstring tendon is actually stronger than her native ACL, and has less risk of muscle atrophy and tendinitis in her knee. Rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction is lengthy, but most athletes are able to return to their sport approximately 9-12 months after surgery.

Update:

Since our last blog on Mikayla Combs, she signed a letter of intent to play for Gino Auriemma at Connecticut, a top basketball program in the country!

 

About Dr. Karas:

karas-speroDr. Karas joined the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center in 2005 as Director of the Emory Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. In addition to this role, he currently serves as the head team physician for the Atlanta Falcons, a consulting team physician for Georgia Tech University, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College, and St. Pius X High School. Prior to this, he served as chief of the Shoulder Service, team physician, and director of the Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Orthopaedics.

Dr. Karas received his undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame, and his Doctor of Medicine degree from Indiana University School of Medicine. After medical school, he completed a residency in Orthopedic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center. After residency, Dr. Karas completed a Knee, Shoulder, and Sports Medicine Fellowship at the prestigious Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, Colorado. While in Colorado, he served as an Associate Team physician for the Denver Broncos and Colorado Rockies professional sports teams.

He is the author of more than 150 publications, presentations, and demonstrational videos. He has trained over 100 residents, fellows, and graduate students in subspecialty care of the shoulder, knee and sports medicine. His research has been published in numerous journals, including the American Journal of Sports Medicine, the Journal of Arthroscopy, the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery and the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. Dr. Karas is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and has held leadership positions in numerous societies, including the American Orthopaedic Association, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.
Dr. Karas is a recognized expert in the field of shoulder surgery, knee surgery, and sports medicine, and has been awarded numerous grants for research and product development. A frequent speaker throughout the United States and internationally, his work has been featured in Ski Magazine, Men’s Health, and on NBC, FOX, and CNN network television. He is also active in quality musculoskeletal research, and has been honored by his peers with nominations for numerous research awards. He actively collaborates with medical corporations by developing cutting-edge technology to improve the instruments and techniques in orthopedic surgery.

Dr. Karas was selected as one of America’s “Top Sports Medicine Specialists” in Men’s Health Magazine. He has also been named one of the “Top Sports Medicine Doctors for Women” by Women’s Health magazine, “Best Orthopaedic Surgeons in America” by Castle Connoly, and the most trusted sports specialist in Atlanta, Georgia by Atlanta Magazine. He is regularly listed in Atlanta Magazine’s Top Doctors. Dr. Karas is a full member of the American Shoulder and Elbow Society, a prestigious “invitation only” society with rigorous selection criteria.
A former collegiate athlete himself, Dr. Karas was a varsity letterman in wrestling at the University of Notre Dame. He continues to participate in sports such as golf, snowboarding, and fitness training. He also coaches little league sports, and is an active member of his church and community.

Dr. Karas and his wife, Johanna, are blessed with three very active and beautiful children – Gus, Elena, and Nicholas.

What To Expect Before and After Spine Surgery

Anxious about spine surgery? Here’s the scoop on what to expect before and after spine surgery.Does your doctor’s spine surgery recommendation have you feeling anxious? Emory’s spine surgeons want you to know what you can expect before and after surgery.

What to Expect Before Spine Surgery

Before surgery, your doctor will talk to you about the risks and benefits of spine surgery, the likelihood of success and what you need to do to prepare for surgery . This discussion is very important to balance the daily impact of your symptoms with the likelihood of improvement or worsening and the risk of complications. Specifically, it’s important to understand the likelihood of improvement of back (or neck) pain versus leg (or arm) pain as the expectation may be different for each.

You will have pre-admission testing, which typically includes:

  • Blood screening
  • Meeting with the anesthesiologist (the doctor who helps keep you safe and pain-free during surgery)
  • Physical exam rechecking your neurologic function (strength, sensation)
  • EKG (electrocardiogram) and/or a chest X-ray, if needed

Your surgeon’s office will call you a few days before surgery to tell you about your exact scheduled surgery time and what time you need to arrive on the day of surgery.

What to Expect After Spine Surgery

After surgery, you can expect:

Would you like to find more answers, learn more or make an appointment?

Yes, I’d like to:

  • Find answers to frequently asked questions
  • Make an appointment with a spine specialist at 404-778-7777.

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About Dr. Rhee

Dr. John Rhee, Orthopedist AtlantaSpecializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis), and surgery for spinal tumors, Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies.  He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery.  In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings.   Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and book chapters, and he has received numerous awards and honors.  He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of numerous books on spine surgery techniques.

Emory Soccer Medicine Doctor takes Chief Role at Mexico vs. Paraguay Game this Weekend

soccer eventEmory Healthcare sports medicine physician Oluseun Olufade, M.D., loves to talk about injury prevention and being prepared to take action should a medical emergency occur. He’s equally passionate when talking about soccer, a favorite sport he enjoyed as a child.

Combine the two topics, and Dr. Olufade becomes one of the region’s most authoritative and enthusiastic voices when it comes to soccer injuries and prevention. That’s just what the Georgia Dome needs for its upcoming May 28 soccer match between world power Mexico and Paraguay. A record, sellout crowd is likely. Mexico played at the Dome against Nigeria in 2014 and against Panama in the 2015 CONCACAF semifinals – both times in front of full houses.

Dr. Olufade is a physician in the Emory Sports Medicine Center. His role as venue medical director at the game is diverse, equal part communications, logistics facilitator and educational liaison between the referees and the two team physicians. That’s before the match begins. Once play starts on the pitch, he’ll be available to both teams to assist in any necessary medical care.

Dr. Olufade has served as team physician, both in the professional MLS ranks with Philadelphia Union, and as a member of the U.S. national team physician pool. He has covered the U.S. 17-year-old men’s national team in international matches in France and Turkey.

“As a venue medical director, the teams aren’t familiar with the city and state, the area hospitals and such,” he said. “That’s the logistical role I play. But also, I will be communicating with the referees about various injuries, particularly chest and heart injuries, because they tend to see and know head injuries and how to immediately get that player treated.”

It is important, Dr. Olufade said, to have medical directors be well versed in sports medicine and orthopedics, and also to be soccer enthusiasts.

“Soccer injuries are different than other sports,” he said. “Ankle, foot, knee and hamstrings injuries are the most common soccer injuries, but as a fan of the sport, you know what to be on the lookout for.”

The May 28 event is somewhat of a soft launch of Emory Healthcare’s Soccer Medicine Program. While not all specifics have been ironed out, Dr. Olufade said the primary goal is to have one-stop-shopping at Emory for soccer health care.

“The plan is to have a group of physicians, therapists and trainers, all who have a passion for soccer and are well trained in the specific injuries most common among soccer players,” he said. “We want to help prevent injuries through training and nutrition, and elevating sports performance, while offering comprehensive care whenever an injury does occur.”

With Atlanta’s booming soccer programs, both for youth and adults, the timing couldn’t be better, he said. The team at Emory is continuing to build its Soccer Medicine Program with plans to launch later this summer. For more information, visit EmoryHealthcare.org/ortho.

About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunDr. Olufade is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

12 Things Every Woman Should Know About Stress Fractures

stress fractureLast week, Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center physician, Oluseun Olufade, MD, attended “Ladies Night Out” at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. Ladies Night Out is an annual health event for women and provides them with a fun night of shopping, free health screenings and casual consultations with local physicians.

At the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center table, Dr. Olufade spoke with women about stress fractures and how to prevent them. Studies show that female athletes are more prone to stress fractures than male athletes. As a fun activity, attendees entered a free drawing for new running sneakers, a key item to preventing stress fractures and other orthopedic injuries. Four lucky women walked away from the event with new shoes, but we want to provide everyone with Dr. Olufade’s helpful tips. Below are 12 things every woman should know about stress fractures:

What is a stress fracture?

1. A stress fracture is a tiny crack in the bone caused by repeated stress or force, often from overuse.

What are the symptoms of a stress fracture?

2. Pain that worsens over time; limping or tenderness. Possible swelling around painful area.

What are the risk factors for stress fractures?

3. Increased amount, distance, intensity or frequency of an activity too rapidly.
4. Female gender: lower bone density, less lean body mass in the lower limbs, low-fat diet and a history of menstrual disturbance are all significant risk factors for stress fractures.
5. Poor footwear: affects the distribution of weight.
6. Sports specific: change in training pattern (i.e., introduction of hill running), change of surface (i.e., soft clay tennis court to a hard court).
7. Weak bones: from osteoporosis, medications or eating disorders.

How do I prevent stress fractures?

8. Set incremental goals: apply stress to the bone in a controlled manner to strengthen the bone over time. Try increasing distance by <10% per week to allow bones to adapt.
9. Build muscle strength in the legs to increase shock absorption and muscle fatigue.
10. Alternate activities to help prevent injury.
11. Warm up before exercising, including stretching.
12. Use the proper equipment, including footwear. Make gradual changes to shoes and running surfaces. Well-cushioned running shoes that fit well can prevent stress fractures (depending on various factors including weight and shoe durability). Runners should replace their shoes every 300-700 miles to allow adequate mid-sole cushioning.

Think you may have a stress fracture? Make an appointment with an Emory sports medicine specialist. We’ll get you up and running again!

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About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunOluseun Olufade, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine . He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

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Chondrosarcoma Patient Story: “I can now walk unaided and enjoy time with my family.”

skiiing patient storyI noticed something was “not right” with my right leg when I couldn’t sit crisscross-applesauce-style on the floor during my daughter’s music class. The tendon near my groin area was very tight and sore. Pilates exercises were difficult to complete and my left leg responded better than my right during daily activities. At the time, I thought maybe the pain was a sign of aging and simply that I needed more exercise and stretching. I continued to go about my daily life, living with pain that was sporadic and more of an ache at that point.

In March 2009, I was on a spring break skiing trip with my family when I noticed my leg felt “wobbly” during the downhill runs. I couldn’t control my right leg well and immediately knew something was wrong, so I stopped skiing. The next day, we went horseback riding and as I swung my leg up and around to get on the horse, there was a sharp stabbing pain at the top of my thigh. That was my big “ah-ha” moment. I knew that once I returned home I needed to seek medical attention, especially since the bursts of pain continued on and off throughout the rest of my trip. When I got home, I visited my primary care doctor who ordered X-rays, MRI and bone scan. After reviewing my results, my primary care doctor referred me to Dr. David Monson, an orthopaedic oncology surgeon at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Monson met with me and explained I had Chondrosarcoma of the hip, which is a rare type of cancerous bone tumor.

Getting the news that it was cancer was startling and left me feeling quite shocked, especially after thinking the pain was just something having to do with the typical aging process. I was expecting them to find arthritis, not cancer. What made me most nervous was the type of cancer I had and its location in my hip. During the first visit with Dr. Monson that day, he walked me and my family through the different treatment options and then recommended I take some time to compare options. Like most people would, I went straight to the internet and began researching my cancer and different options. What I found scared me – up until five years ago, most tumors of the pelvis were surgically treated through amputation. This made me extremely anxious. I didn’t want to lose my leg.

During this tough decision-making process, Dr. Monson made me feel comfortable and at peace. He was extremely knowledgeable, very caring and direct. After reviewing my options with Dr. Monson, I felt sure he was the guy to do my surgery, so I made my decision and moved forward. Andre Roy, Dr. Monson’s Nurse Practitioner, was available any time I called and provided answers to my multitude of questions. I felt very cared for and looked after at Emory, and I was impressed with the office staff every time I came in for an appointment.

In the end, we decided that during the surgery to remove my tumor, we would reconstruct my hip using a saddle prosthesis. I was pleased that Dr. Monson knew how to perform this procedure comforted that is one of the few doctors that knows how to place such a prosthetic.

Following my surgery in November of 2009, I went through extensive physical therapy. Today I am walking really well and keeping up with my active teenage daughter. My range of motion is limited so minor adjustments have been made in my daily life to stay safe and comfortable. I’m thankful to be able to do all the things that I can do now, and continue enjoying life!

A note from Dr. David Monson

Bone tumors of the pelvis are uncommon and their surgical management depends on multiple factors, including tumor size, location and whether the tumor is benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These factors determine whether a limb-saving surgery is possible or not and if the losses associated with surgery may result in a non-functioning extremity.

Three main factors to consider with pelvis surgery relate to stability of the hip after surgery, and function of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A minimum of two out of three must remain intact for the lower limb to be worth saving. Fortunately for Mrs. Powers, both her sciatic and femoral nerves were able to be preserved and we were able to restore stability of her right hip with a saddle prosthesis.

Options for reconstruction of the hip joint after removal of pelvic bone tumors may include prosthesis such as a saddle, a cadaveric bone transplant (allograft) or sometimes no reconstruction at all. Each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages which makes selecting the right treatment for each individual patient unique based upon the factors above.

At Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, our goal is to always offer patients with what we expect to be the most functional, yet durable surgical reconstruction possible without compromising the long term likelihood of cure. These surgeries are often quite complex and can take as long as 6-8 hours or longer. Complications can occur and the recovery time after surgery takes anywhere from six months to a year. We want patients to be fully educated before heading into a surgery this complex.

Mrs. Powers has worked extremely hard with her physiotherapy and has achieved an excellent functional outcome. We are incredibly proud of her and most grateful that there has been no recurrence of her tumor!

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Three Emory Surgeons Named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016

spine250x250Woot woot – it has been a great 2016 so far for Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center! Three of our spine surgeons were recently named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016. Congratulations to John Heller, MD, and Tim Yoon, MD, on receiving this achievement. Combined, these three physicians represent seventy-three years of spine surgery expertise. Impressively, eight other surgeons named to the list completed their residency and/or fellowship at Emory Healthcare.

Read below to learn what Becker’s Spine Review had to say about our nationally recognized spine surgeons:

Scott Boden, MD: Board-certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Boden serves as the director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and an orthopedic surgery professor at Emory University. He led the research on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology. Spine and the Journal of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, among other journals, have published his work. Dr. Boden received the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award, Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons’ Marshall R. Urist Young Investigator Award and five North American Spine Society Outstanding Research Paper Awards, among various other honors. Dr. Boden completed his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland.

John G. Heller, MD: Dr. Heller is a spine surgeon and the Baur Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory Healthcare. He focuses on the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, particularly in cervical disc replacement and laminoplasty. He was a Kashiwagi-Suzuki Traveling Fellow and he earned the Volvo Award for Low Back Pain Research. His additional training includes a fellowship with the University of California Medical Center in San Diego.

Tim S. Yoon, MD: Dr. Yoon is an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Emory Clinic. He is an active researcher, focusing on gene therapy for disc disease. His work has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Current Opinion in Orthopaedics and Skeletal Radiology. His clinical interests also include cervical fusion, compression fractures, disc degeneration, discectomy, herniated disc, kyphoplasty, kyphosis and laminoplasty. His additional training includes a spine fellowship in Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago.

About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Every day, the highly regarded physicians and surgeons at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center work together, across metro Atlanta, to diagnose and treat a variety of orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine conditions.

Our physicians use progressive treatment approaches – many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory. Learn more by clicking here, or call 404-778-3350.

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