Can Osteoarthritis Be Prevented?

preventing osteoarthritisIf you’re starting to feel the twinges of pain or stiffness in your joints or spine, you may be wondering what’s causing it and whether you can prevent it from getting worse. One common contributor to joint and spine pain is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease that is caused by degeneration of the cartilage, the cushiony substance between the bones, and if severe, it can then affect the bone itself. Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the weight-bearing joints (hips, knees, and spine).

The chance of developing arthritis increases with age. Although some people may have it as early as their 20s and 30s, it is more likely to develop osteoarthritis in your 50 and 60s and older. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, so prevention is the key. There are some risk factors that you can’t change, such as your genes (heredity) and your age. The goal is to decrease risk factors that you do have control over to help prevent osteoarthritis. These include:

  • Weight – obesity increases risk of arthritis
  • Trauma
  • Performing repetitive-motion tasks over a long period of time
  • Weaksurrounding muscles

The same factors that will help you prevent osteoarthritis can also help treat the pain and discomfort from osteoarthritis. Extra weight puts a strain on your joints, so try to keep your weight in a healthy range or lose weight if you’re not in that range. If you’re not sure what a healthy range is for you, check with your doctor. Also, keeping your muscles strong can help decrease the weight on your joints. If pain occurs while you’re doing an activity, listen to your body and decrease your intensity. Bear in mind that repetitive activities can cause joint pain and stiffness. Repetitive activities might include working on the computer or repeated bending or lifting. Try to find other ways of performing daily activities and be sure to take frequent breaks.

If you’re experiencing ongoing or increasing pain and stiffness, it may be time to see one of the physicians at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center for further evaluation and treatment.

Emory physiatrists are physicians specially trained in rehabilitation and pain management. Our physiatrists can work with you to develop a plan that includes daily strengthening and stretching exercises to reduce pain and stiffness. Because osteoarthritis can occur in different areas of your body, you want a plan designed to target the affected joint or joints. Your physician may suggest formal therapy or bracing the joint to help ease pain. Finally, your doctor can suggest an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication or prescribe medication to help with the pain if needed.

Do you have osteoarthritis? What do you do to ease the pain and stiffness? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

Dr. Diana SodiqAbout Diana Sodiq, DO:
Diana Sodiq, DO, is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry). As an osteopathic physician, Dr. Sodiq is trained in both traditional medicine as well as osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT). She started practicing at Emory in 2010.

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