Posts Tagged ‘prostate cancer risks’

Takeaways from the Prostate Cancer Live Chat at Winship

prostate-chat-cil638Thanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, November 24th for the live online prostate cancer program chat at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University hosted by Drs. Pattaras & Rossi.

Drs. Pattaras & Rossi answered several of your questions about prostate cancer risk factors, symptoms and therapy. Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few follow up questions we didn’t get to from the chat:

Question: What preventive measures are most effective for improving urinary function and quality of life?

Answer: Preventative measures include exercise, weight loss and a healthy low fat diet. Unfortunately there are genetic predispositions for prostate enlargement and bladder dysfunction including spinal disorders that even prevention will not help. See a urologist if there is a noticeable change in urination.

Question: Conventional wisdom is that if you have prostate cancer you should no take testosterone. Dr. Abraham Morgantaler has written a number of articles in JAMA and NEJM challenging that conventional wisdom. Are doctors Pattaras and Rossi familiar with his research, and if so, any thoughts?

Answer: Though specifically not familiar with his publications there are numerous studies which suggest that men with low testosterone could be supplemented to normal levels if watched carefully. Testosterone itself does not cause prostate cancer but can feed advanced cases. Chemical castration is a therapy for advanced prostate cancer but is not done for localized treated cancer so testosterone supplementation is feasible but does have risks. We have placed men on testosterone replacement after therapy as long as they are compliant.

If you missed this chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. For more information go to the Prostate Cancer at Winship Cancer Institute website or 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

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If you have additional questions for Drs. Pattaras & Rossi, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

Foods that Fight Prostate Cancer

prostate healthy eatingEating a healthy diet helps reduce your chances of getting cancer, but which foods should men eat to reduce their prostate cancer risk and why? See our list of cancer-fighting foods below to find out.

1. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are packed with lycopene; a member of the carotenoid family found commonly in red pigmented fruit and vegetables, lycopene has been established as having strong antioxidant properties. Research suggests that lycopene is a preventive agent for prostate disease. [1]

2. Watermelon

Watermelon, like tomatoes, is loaded with lycopene. In fact, one cup has the lycopene content of two tomatoes. But watermelon is also rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene, antioxidants that help to protect cells from damage and rid your body of harmful cells that can lead to cancer.

3. Garlic

Garlic is famed for its supposed health benefits, and studies concerning its anti-cancer benefits look promising. Several compounds are involved in garlic’s possible anti-cancer effects – garlic contains allyl sulfur and other compounds that slow or prevent the growth of tumor cells. In one study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 2002, scientists discovered that men who ate about a clove of garlic daily had a 50 percent reduced risk of developing prostate cancer. [2]

4. Green Tea

Green tea contains polyphenol compounds, particularly catechins, which are antioxidants and whose biological activities may be relevant to cancer prevention. Studies have shown that green tea and its components effectively mitigate cellular damage due to oxidative stress, and green tea extract is reported to induce cancer cell death and starve tumors by curbing the growth of new blood vessels that feed them. [3]

5. Soy

Soy fills the body with isoflavones — compounds that act like the hormone estrogen in humans — and have been found to have an abundance of anti-cancer benefits. Studies have shown that the isoflavones in soy inhibit prostate cancer cell growth, induce cellular death, and enhance the ability of radiation to kill prostate cancer cells. [4]

6. Beans

Beans are a good source of protein; a good alternative to meat. Beans are high in fiber.

7. Broccoli

Studies suggest a link between cruciferous vegetables and prostate cancer risk. Broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetables and contains the phytochemical sulforaphane, which targets cancer cells.

8. Fish

Fish have a healthier balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, which may help prevent the development of prostate cancer. Eat fish found in cold waters to increase Omega-3 intake: salmon, herring, mackerel, trout, sardines

Sources:
[1] Ilic D., “Lycopene for the prevention and treatment of prostate disease.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24531784
[2] Milner JA. “A historical perspective on garlic and cancer.” J Nutr. 2001 Mar;131(3s):1027S-31S.
[3] Butt MS, Sultant MT. “Green tea: nature’s defense against malignancies.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19399671
[4] Mahmoud AM, Yang W, Bosland MC., Soy isoflavones and prostate cancer: A review of molecular mechanisms.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24373791

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s Prostate Cancer Program offers a multidisciplinary approach. Our team of experienced specialists in urology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, advanced practice nursing, and social work deliver a comprehensive and coordinated approach to treating prostate cancer.

At Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute, our specialized clinicians use the latest precision medicine treatments and procedures that improve prostate cancer care. Proton therapy, a precision radiation treatment, is now one of the many technologically advanced tools to precisely and effectively treat each individual patient’s specific cancer.

About Tiffany Barrett

tiffanybarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and sought after expert in her field. She is a key contributor to support programs at Winship and provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship Cancer Institute patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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