Posts Tagged ‘prostate cancer faqs’

Prostate Cancer: Statistics That May Surprise You

prostate cancer factsAccording to the American Cancer Society (ACS), the cancers that most frequently affect men are prostate, colon, lung and skin cancers. The most common men’s-specific cancer in America, affecting 1 in 7 men, is prostate cancer. One new case occurs every 2.3 minutes and a man dies from prostate cancer every 18 minutes.

You probably didn’t know this shocking statistic, from the Prostate Cancer Foundation: a man is 35% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than a woman is to be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Yet, despite these realities we don’t talk as openly about this as women do about a serious health condition. There are disputes about screenings for prostate cancer specifically, but I am an advocate of screening– including not only the PSA but also the digital rectal exam. From the screenings, you and your doctor will determine if biopsies are needed to detect aggressive cancers that need immediate treatment but also pick up cancers that are “quasi cancer” and safe to watch rather than treat immediately. Over a five-to-10-year period, about a third of men whose cancers are considered low risk turn worse and require treatment. When prostate cancer is caught in the early stages, the treatment options and outcomes are significantly better.

Nearly 3 million American men are currently living with prostate cancer. Emory Healthcare is committed to providing the highest quality healthcare to its patients, with the most up-to-date treatment options available. A multidisciplinary prostate cancer team — involving urology medical oncology, radiation oncology, diagnostic imaging– at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have come together to move novel treatments for advanced prostate cancer forward.

Start today and take control of your wellness.

  • Honestly discuss prostate cancer.
  • Avoid cancer-causing activities like tobacco use and excessive drinking.
  • Be proactive. Commit yourself to regular physical activity to maintain a healthy weight.
  • Know your risks and your family history.
  • Get regular check-ups; speak with your primary care physician about whether prostate screening is appropriate for you.

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s Prostate Cancer Program offers a multidisciplinary approach. Our team of experienced specialists in urology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, advanced practice nursing, and social work deliver a comprehensive and coordinated approach to treating prostate cancer.

At Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute, our specialized clinicians use the latest precision medicine treatments and procedures that improve prostate cancer care. Proton therapy, a precision radiation treatment, is now one of the many technologically advanced tools to precisely and effectively treat each individual patient’s specific cancer.

 

About Dr. Sanda

Martin G. Sanda, MD is chair of the Department of Urology at Emory University School of Medicine and Director of the Prostate Cancer Center at Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute.

As a urological surgeon specializing in cancers of the prostate and bladder, Sanda focuses on developing new surgical and non-surgical approaches to cancer care and to improving the quality of life among cancer survivors. Currently, he is spearheading studies that seek to develop urine tests for detecting prostate cancer; develop benchmarks for improving quality of life among cancer survivors; and develop innovative prostate cancer vaccines.

 

RELATED RESOURCES:
Cancer Clinical Study Leads to Video Tool for Prostate Cancer Patients
Two Patients Benefit from Two Alternative Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer
PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer – A Healthy Debate
Questions on Validity of PSA Test as Prostate Cancer Screening Tool
Prostate Cancer, To Screen or Not?
Winship Cancer Institute Website

Takeaways from Dr. Sanda’s Chat on Prostate Cancer

Thank you for attending the live chat with Dr. Martin Sanda on prostate cancer. (Link to: ) Your questions and participation were terrific. Below are additional Q&As that we didn’t have time to get to during the live chat portion.

As you know, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, second only to skin cancers. Emory Healthcare is privileged to partner with you in your health and is ready and able to assist if needed. Please use the resources on this page and this website to contact us if we can help in any way.

Question: What are today’s best prostate cancer diagnosis methodologies?
Answer: Despite a lot of advances in imaging tests such as MRI or higher-resolution ultrasound, there is still a need to biopsy the prostate in order to determine whether or not prostate cancer is present. The biopsy provides important information, not only as to whether there are cancer cells, but if so, how aggressive or how fast-growing those cancer cells appear to be. Bone scans and CT scans are useful to look for spread of prostate cancer elsewhere. Also, new PET (positron emission tomography) scans or other diagnostic studies that image molecules which are taken up by cancerous tissue and not by normal tissue are emerging. But, their role in standard care is not yet sorted out. MRI can provide valuable information about the size and configuration of tumors in the prostate itself and the immediate vicinity, as part of a watchful waiting monitoring plan, or as a guide for treatment planning.

Question: What are the dangers of conventional biopsy?
Answer: The main risk of prostate cancer biopsy is infection, which can be seen in approximately one out of 50 to one out of 100 cases and can require hospitalization for treatment. More commonly, some men may feel faint after a biopsy and should plan on taking the day off or taking it easy if they undergo a prostate biopsy procedure. Rarely, men might experience bleeding from where the needle is inserted into the prostate and this, too, can require hospitalization. Common after prostate biopsy is having blood in the semen or ejaculate; however, this does not pose any danger or risks and will typically resolve in a matter of a few weeks.

Question: Are there new drugs and and prostate cancer treatments on the near horizon?
Answer: Major scientific discoveries have taken place over the past five to 10 years and many more are underway. This has led to a half-dozen new treatments for advanced prostate cancer that have become available in the past several years. A broad range of new treatments are being developed, including more refined types of hormonal therapy, including immune therapies or therapeutic vaccines and also targeted therapies that are aimed at molecular differences between the cancer cell and normal tissue.

Related Resources:

About Dr. Martin Sanda

Dr. Martin SandaMartin G. Sanda, MD, an internationally recognized prostate cancer surgeon and scientist, was appointed chair of the Department of Urology at Emory University School of Medicine and service chief for Emory Healthcare. He also serves as director of the Prostate Cancer Center, which will be established within Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute.

Sanda joins Emory from Harvard Medical School, where he was professor of surgery in urology, and from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he served as director of the Prostate Cancer Center. He was also the co-leader of the Prostate Cancer Program at the Dana Farber Cancer Center.

 

Though Common, Prostate Cancer is Often Very Treatable – Join Our Q&A Chat for Details

Prostate Cancer Q&A ChatDid you know that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer experienced by men, after skin cancer? The good news is that, when caught early, it can often be treated with great success.

Millions of men are living today as survivors of prostate cancer. Being armed with good information in advance is a key ingredient in protecting yourself or your loved ones from this disease.

Join Emory Chairman of the Department of Urology, Dr. Martin Sanda, on Tuesday, September 24, for an online web chat to discuss “Prostate Cancer.”

Prostate Cancer Chat Sign Up