Posts Tagged ‘live online chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Cohen’s “Advancements in Breast Imaging” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us for last week’s live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, discussed the latest in breast imaging screening and technology.

Questions varied from ,“What are the current breast screening guidelines?” to “What is tomosynthesis and when is it the right choice for screening?” Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the chat. Make sure to view the chat transcript for the whole discussion.

Question: What are the current breast cancer screening guidelines?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Women aged 40 and younger should have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years. All women aged 40 and over should get a yearly screening mammogram, clinical breast exam and perform a monthly breast self-examination.

 

Question:
When is breast tomosynthesis the right choice for screening? And how does tomosynthesis compare to an MRI in diagnosing cancer?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Digital Tomosynthesis (3D mammography) is an improvement on traditional 2D mammography. Rather than the traditional single view of a breast in 2D mammography, 3D mammography obtains a series of very thin 1 mm sections of the breast. This allows us to look at the breast as if we were viewing pages of a book and gives a much more accurate look inside. If tomosynthesis is available at your breast imaging facility, it is an excellent way to screen.

Studies have shown that 3D mammography permits detections of more cancers, while at the same time reducing the number of unnecessary call-backs to evaluate lesions that are not cancer. This is a win-win for the patient. MRI screening is reserved for a limited number of patients at high risk.

Question:
What about the radiation exposure for these types of test [tomosynthesis]; is it different from traditional mammograms?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
With current technology, a patient receives both a 2D and a 3D mammogram at the same time. The addition of 3D about doubles the radiation exposure compared to 2D alone, but is still within FDA guidelines for mammography.

Also, some very exciting technology is on the horizon that will permit us to create a 2D mammogram from a 3D mammogram using sophisticated computers. When that becomes available, we will only need to do a 3D mammogram, thereby reducing the radiation exposure to the original level.

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Cohen, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript.

If you have any questions for Dr. Cohen, don’t hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below!

Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Advancements in Breast Imaging ChatBreast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and the breast care specialists across Emory Healthcare want you to know the importance of screening and early detection.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women (without breast cancer symptoms), age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year as long as they are in good health. Getting yearly screening mammograms increases the chance of detecting cancers in the early stages, before they start to cause symptoms. By detecting cancer early, screening exams also help increase the chance of survival and lower the risk of mortality.

At Emory Healthcare, we are proud to offer patients with leading breast screening techniques, including the latest in breast imaging technology, called tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography.

Learn more about breast screening guidelines and advancements in breast imaging by joining us on Tuesday, October 21 at 12:00 pm EST for a live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, Director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, will be available to answer questions such as: what is the latest in breast imaging technology? When should I start getting screened? To register for the chat, click here.

Also, during October, the Emory Breast Imaging Centers are offering extended and weekend hours for women needing a screening mammogram. Dates and details are below:

Extended Hours: Thursday, October 9, Tuesday, October 21, Thrusday October 23; 7:30 a.m – 7:00 p.m. at the Emory Breast Imaging Center on Clifton Road.

Saturday Hours: October 18, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

Registration: To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-PINK (7465). Standard rates apply.

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Time: 12:00- 1:00 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Michael Cohen
Chat Topic: Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

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Takeaways from Dr. Saba’s Head and Neck Cancer Chat

Thanks to everyone who joined us on Tuesday, June 24, for our live online chat on “Risk factors, symptoms and treatment options for head and neck cancer” led by Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. During the chat, Dr. Saba addressed some of your questions relating to risk factors, symptoms and the latest research for head and neck cancer. See all of Dr. Saba’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer? How do I know if I need to go get checked out?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: Symptoms include having a lump in the neck, persistent changes in your voice over time, difficulty swallowing, and unusual pain in the neck/throat area (pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time). These are some common symptoms, so if you’re experiencing any of these, it would probably be a good idea to talk to your physician.

 

Question: Are there particular factors or traits that may pre-dispose a person to head or neck cancers?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: There are certain well-defined risk factors for head and neck cancer, including a history of smoking or alcohol consumption. It has also been observed that HPV-related oropharynx cancer is increasing in Caucasian males, whereas oral tongue cancer seems to be increasing in Caucasian females. While there is an increased risk of head and neck cancer in these groups of people, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are at high risk if you fall into one of these groups.
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/cancer for more information on cancer treatment at Winship at Emory.

Risk Factors and Symptoms of Head and Neck Cancer

Head and Neck Cancer ChatHead and neck cancer includes a collective group of cancers occurring in the head or neck region, ranging from the nasal cavity and sinuses, to the back of the throat, including the oral cavity, tonsils, base of the tongue, nasopharynx, hypopharynx and larynx.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. Studies show that these cancers are more common in people over the age of 50 and three times more common in men than in women; however, if diagnosed early, head and neck cancer is often curable.

Recently, a growing number of cancers occurring in the base of the tongue and tonsils have been linked to human papillomavirus (HPV), which is already a well known risk factor for cervical cancer in women. HPV-related head and neck cancer is a distinct type of cancer and so far has been diagnosed more in men than women.

Join Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, as he hosts a live chat on “Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer.” Dr. Saba will be available to answer all of your questions such as:

  • What are the known risk factors linked to head and neck cancer?
  • What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer?
  • How is head and neck cancer diagnosed?
  • Can head and neck cancer be prevented?

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Time: 12:30- 1:30 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Nabil Saba
Chat Topic: Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer

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