Posts Tagged ‘cancer survivorship’

Cancer Survival Rates Expected to Rise by 37% over 10 years!

By the year 2022, there will be 18 million cancer survivors living in the United States, according to a recent report by the American Association for Cancer Research. The report points out that as survival rates increase and cancer survivors become an ever-growing portion of the population, a coordinated effort will become crucial to meeting long-term medical, psychosocial and practical needs.

When news of the boost in survivor numbers made headlines, CNN Newsroom anchor Brooke Baldwin brought Emory surgical oncologist Charles Staley, MD on set to interview him as both a cancer doctor, and a cancer survivor. Watch the full interview below:

As more people are living longer after a cancer diagnosis it is very important to educate survivors on the after effects, long term effects, nutrition, and fitness following cancer care. Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University has a Survivorship program to help patients get back to life after surviving cancer. Get more information about the survivorship program.

Over the course of the next few months we will highlight many different areas of survivorship on the Winship blog so make sure to follow us to get more detailed information on living after cancer.

Dr. Charles StaleyAbout Dr. Charles Staley

Dr. Staley is the Chief of Surgical Oncology for Emory University Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Dr. Staley specializes in treating cancers of the esophagus, pancreas, stomach, liver, small bowel and rectum. He has investigated gene therapy for metastatic colon cancer and radiofrequency ablation with intra-arterial chemotherapy for patients with colorectal liver metastases. Currently, he and his colleagues are exploring methods of using nanotechnology to treat and diagnose pancreatic and breast cancer. He joined Emory University School of Medicine faculty in 1995 after a surgical fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Dr. Staley earned his medical degree at Dartmouth University School of Medicine and conducted his residency at the University of Pittsburgh’s University Health Center. Dr. Staley is an active member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, The Georgia Surgical Society, and the Society of Surgical Oncology.

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Prepare for Life After a Diagnosis of Cancer

Cancer SurvivorshipAccording to the American Cancer Society, there are over 13.5 million survivors of cancer in the US today (a cancer survivor is defined as anyone from the moment of diagnosis throughout the balance of his or her life). This number is expected to significantly increase over the next 20 years due to improved early detection, improved treatment options, aging baby boomers and longer life expectancies. With longer life expectancies, cancer survivors can experience a higher burden of illness than others not diagnosed with cancer.

Few experiences in life match the feeling patients and family members have when they complete acute treatment for cancer and begin their road to survivorship. Some patients move on quickly and experience no further challenges associated with cancer, but others experience “after effects,” or long-term or late effects. Cancer survivors, and their families, should be aware of these potential after effects so they can prepare themselves to deal with them as they get back to a more normal life.

After affects can range from mild to severe and vary from survivor to survivor.

  • Long–term effects of cancer develop during cancer treatment and may not go away.  Some long-term effects can improve such as anemia, fatigue or anxiety.  Some potentially permanent long-term effects are limb loss, weakness or nerve damage.
  • Late effects are delayed effects of cancer treatment and they can surface months to years after treatment.  Some late effects of cancer treatment are heart disease, lung disease, lymphedema, osteoporosis, depression and secondary cancers.

After effects are categorized into physical, emotional and practical after effects.

Physical after effects include:

  • Fatigue
  • Loss of limbs
  • Scars
  • Pain
  • Early menopause
  • Infertility
  • Loss of limb or use of limb
  • Lymphedema
  • Impotence
  • Loss of bladder and bowel control

Emotional after effects include:

  • Body image changes
  • Sexuality changes
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Anger
  • Anxiety
  • Fear

Practical after effects include:

  • Difficulty working due to physical and emotional after effects
  • Changes in relationships with loved ones, friends or co–workers
  • Problems getting or retaining health or life insurance coverage
  • Challenges communicating with healthcare team members
  • Financial stressors
  • Employment discrimination

It is very important to note that not all patients experience significant after effects of cancer, but knowing about them will help you cope and may limit the severity of these after effects with  early intervention and treatment.

Talk to your care provider about the after effects you might expect with your cancer and what you possibly could experience based on your treatment regimen. Keep a record of your symptoms to discuss with the care provider and make sure to schedule screening tests and follow up exams as recommended.

About Joan Giblin, NP

Joan Giblin, Winship Cancer Institute

Joan Giblin, NP has a total of 43 years of nursing experience, 25 as a family nurse practitioner and 16 as an oncology nurse practitioner, where she is actively involved in patient care and clinical trials.  In 2011, Ms. Giblin assumed a new role as the director of the Winship Survivorship Program with primary responsibilities for developing the program as a resource for patients and a means to facilitate continued good health and quality of life for cancer survivors.  Prior to this, she was the director of the Winship Call Center, the first point of contact for new cancer patients, and was instrumental in establishing protocols and procedures to streamline access to care at Winship.

Clinical Specialties: Ms. Giblin’s experience as an oncology nurse practitioner gives her unique perspective on the needs of cancer patients and cancer survivors. As a clinical nurse practitioner, she was part of the aerodigestive team, specializing in the care of patients with lung, head and neck and throat cancers.

Research Focus: Ms. Giblin’s current research is in the area of survivorship related to long term and late effects of cancer treatment and adherence to follow up.

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The Effects of Chemo and Radiation on Survivors Web Chat

I am a survivor. I beat Ewing’s sarcoma, a childhood cancer, which I was diagnosed with at 8 years old. I fought the cancer with an intense treatment plan that included 6 weeks of radiation therapy followed by 7 cycles of multi – agent chemotherapy. As a result of the aggressive treatment plan, I developed heart failure and ultimately had to receive a heart transplant. I beat the odds and am here to tell my story of survivorship!

Join me on Tuesday, February 19 from 12-1pm for a live, interactive chat about weathering the storms of cancer. Despite the side effects that have impacted my life greatly, long after the completion of my therapy, I am bubbling with hope and smiling about thoughts of my future.

About Stephanie Zimmerman

Stephanie is a patient and family advisor for the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. She is also a cancer and heart failure survivor and late effects cancer educator. She co –founded My Heart, yourHands, Inc., a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to equipping survivors with late effects after cancer treatment.

 

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7 Tips to Peacefully Celebrate the Holidays When You are Not Feeling Jolly

Survivor Tips for a Relaxing HolidayIt is the time of the year to feel happy…time to be generous…time to spend time with loved ones… and sing festively? Are you not in the mood this season? Don’t worry; you are not alone. Many people find the holidays very stressful and sometimes even sad. Social engagements and family gatherings add another time commitment to already busy days. Gift giving puts pressure on already strapped budgets. Expectations of how you should be enjoying this time of year only make you feel worse. All of these feelings are magnified and complicated by cancer treatment during the holidays.

There are things you can do to help yourself get through the holidays and maybe even enjoy them a bit. Self care is important throughout the year, but during a stressful period it must be a priority.

1) Get Adequate Rest

Making sure you get adequate sleep nightly is key!

  • Adults need 7-9 hours every night and children need 10 – 12 hours of sleep each night.
  • Set a bedtime, and get out of bed every morning at the same time.
  • Don’t drink caffeine after lunch.
  • Limit alcohol to one drink at dinner.
  • Avoid stressful conversations after dinner.
  • Enjoy a relaxation routine in the hour before bed.

Relaxation routines depend on what works best for you, but consider stretching, breathing slowly, writing in a gratitude journal or listening to gentle music. For more information on the importance of adequate sleep and rest, visit the National Sleep Foundation’s website.

2) Pay Close Attention To Your Diet

Another key aspect of self-care is attention to diet and exercise.

  • Fill your plate with colorful foods, mostly fruits and vegetables.
  • Eat only one plate of food at each meal.
  • Enjoy a holiday dessert, but a small serving is enough.
  • Cook with family, enjoy the conversation in the kitchen, but wait to put food in your mouth until you sit down to the meal.
  • Instead of soda, drink warm tea or cider.
  • After the meal, take a walk. Take a walk 3 times a day. Bring someone on the walk whose company you enjoy.

3) Listen To Music You Like

If elevator carols make you crazy, actively search for music you actually like, maybe Celtic  tunes, old country or Jamaican steel drums, and turn that on whenever you can.

4) Try Alternative Gifts This Year

  • If your budget is tight, make gifts this year. Paint on canvas, write a poem, organize a scrapbook of old pictures, and cook a new dish. Or offer a service, such as walking a dog, watching children, delivering meals, organizing a closet.
  • If wrapping presents makes you grumpy, spend time finding wrapping paper you like. Design your own paper. Make your own cloth bags that can be reused. Wrap in plain paper and finger paint it.

5) Turn Your Hospital Experience Around

If going to the hospital or clinic during the holidays brings you down, try to turn the experience around. The staff is always asking you questions, how about you ask them a couple? Ask  the front desk, the valet, the nurse what they like about the holidays, what music they like, and what time of year they prefer.

6) Take Time Out Each Day to Be Positive, Relax and Breathe!

  • Every day, take time to breathe. Turn off the TV and computer. Sit down, stretch your head to the sky, softly close your eyes, relax your shoulders, breath in through your nose slowly and out slowly through your mouth. Say to yourself “I can breathe, I can do it.”
  • Every day remind yourself, “I am here today, I am going to find one thing I like today to make this day worthwhile.” Small things count. Notice a tree, feel the cool air, smile at someone.

7) Treat Yourself to an Alternative Therapy

Get a massage, try a Tai Chi or yoga class, consider acupuncture, drink green tea, or add turmeric to your favorite vegetable stir-fry. Many health benefits of alternative and complementary medicine are described at http://nccam.nih.gov. Be sure to check with your physician before you begin any new exercise programs, and let your physician know about any supplements you take.

To truly make a difference in the way you feel, daily make the effort to do some of the things mentioned above. You don’t need to do them all, but pick three things and make the commitment to do them every day!

Best wishes for a healthy and happy New Year!
Wendy Baer, MD

About Wendy Baer, MD
Wendy Baer, MD, Winship Cancer Institute

Wendy Baer, MD, is Medical Director of Psychiatric Oncology with appointments in the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Winship Cancer Institute.

Clinical Specialties In her work at the Winship Cancer Institute, Dr. Baer helps patients and their families deal with the stress of receiving a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment. As a Psychiatrist she has expertise in treating clinical depression and anxiety both with medications and psychotherapy to help people manage emotions, behaviors and relationships. The fundamental goal of Dr. Baer’s practice is to promote wellness and maximize patients’ quality of life as much as possible. She believes strongly in the team approach to patient care and collaborates regularly with patients’ doctors, nurses and social workers.

Education Dr. Baer attended medical school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she graduated with honors. From UNC she went to the University of Pennsylvania where she completed her residency in Psychiatry and served as the Chief Resident in her senior year. Prior to moving to Atlanta, Dr Baer worked in with patients dealing with cancer at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle, WA.

33% of All U.S. Cancer Deaths Linked to Diet & Exercise

Nutrition to Fight CancerStudies consistently show that a good diet and regular exercise can reduce your risk of heart disease, but did you know you can also reduce your risk of cancer by eating well and regularly exercising? Our genes play a large role in whether we develop cancer (some cancer types more than others), but studies show, and our experts at the Winship Cancer Institute confirm, we can take action to lower our risk of developing many cancer types. By avoiding tobacco products, maintaining a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet and staying active, you can dramatically reduce your risk of dying from cancer.

I hosted an online chat on the topic of healthy eating during the holidays this week, and in it we covered lots of topics related to nutrition, health, exercise and wellness. Below are some of the most important takeaways from the chat for you to apply not just during the holidays, but year round!

Exercise: 

  • Achieve and maintain a healthy weight. We may tire of hearing it, but maintaining a healthy body weight is essential to your health.
  • As many as 1 out of 5 of all cancer-related deaths are linked to excessive body weight. Obesity is clearly linked with increase in several types of cancer, including breast, colon and rectum, edometrial, esophageal, kidney and pancreatic cancer.
  • Regular physical activity is critical to your health and wellness. Physical activity can help reduce the risk of breast, colon, endometrial and prostate cancers.
  • Adults should try to exercise for either 75 minutes per week at high intensity, or at least 150 minutes at moderate intensity each week. The latter equates to just two and a half hours of walking.
  • Children should exercise one hour each day at moderate intensity, but 3 days a week at high intensity, and limit sedentary activities such as sitting, lying down, playing video games, watching TV, etc.

Nutrition:

Maintain healthy eating habits by emphasizing consumption of a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. As I mentioned in the chat, all fruits and vegetables have protective and preventive cancer benefits. Here are some guidelines to consider when it comes to nutrition:

  • Eat at least 2 ½ cups of fruits and vegetables each day.
  • Choose whole grains as opposed to refined grain products (such as white rice).
  • Limit red meat and processed meat.
  • If you can’t get fresh produce, opt for frozen fruits and veggies over those in a can. Frozen produce is typically less processed and contains less sodium.
  • If you’re looking for protein options other than meat, try beans, nuts, soy, eggs, yogurt, cheese, milk, and whole grains such as barley and quinoa.

Lifestyle:

Limit your alcohol intake. Alcohol is a known risk factor for cancers of the mouth, throat, voice box, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum and breast.

  • Women should limit themselves to one drink a day.
  • Men should limit consumption to 2 drinks per day.

For more from our chat, you can view the chat transcript here. Although we can not totally prevent cancer, we have the ability to reduce our own risk by taking action. Winship wants to help you win the fight against cancer by arming you with as much knowledge as possible! If you have additional thoughts, questions, or tips to share, please do so using the comments below.

Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LDAbout Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD

Tiffany Barrett provides personalized nutritional advice to Emory Winship patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. Ms. Barrett also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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We Are Winship – Survive and Thrive

Shawn Ware felt a small lump in her breast while in the shower on January 2nd, 2009, and on that day, the journey on the fight against breast cancer began for Shawn, her husband Albert, daughter Demitria, son Jalen, and mother Eva Freeman. As part of her treatment plan, Shawn underwent a lumpectomy and additional treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

Shawn Ware, breast cancer survivor

Shawn Ware

“You know those side effects that you see in fine print? I had all those and more,” she says, somehow able to laugh about them now. “I didn’t know that your eyelashes act as windshield wipers, and when I lost mine, I had to wear glasses just to keep things from getting in my eyes.”

Shawn triumphed. “I was ready to conquer the world after my last round of radiation,” she says. And three years later, she is considered a survivor and a reason for celebration.

“Cancer, it stinks,” says Shawn, the general manager of Blomeyer Health Fitness Center at Emory. “But you do change. You certainly learn to appreciate the good and not let the little things bother you any more.”

Like millions of other Americans, Shawn is part of a growing trend—more people than ever are surviving cancer. In just six years, the number of cancer survivors has jumped by almost 20 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute—11.7 million in 2007, up from 9.8 million in 2001, the most recent years available.

The good news comes with some challenges, however. As cancer treatment has become more successful, survivors —and their caregivers and providers—have learned that there is a cost to surviving.

“Long-term survivorship starts on the day treatment ends,” says nurse practitioner Joan Giblin, the director of Winship’s new Survivorship Program. “You’re actively doing something during treatment, but when treatment ends, many patients tell us they feel like they have been set adrift without a clear course. Our survivorship program is trying to bridge that gap and provide survivors with tools for these difficult times.”

Giblin says that some survivors respond by isolating themselves. Still others “jump right back into their old lives or try to adjust to a new life by adapting to any after-effects they may still be experiencing.”

Survivors of all types of cancer can face myriad physical issues. Treatment itself can be so hard on the body that survivors sometimes suffer chronic pain, heart problems, depression, sexual dysfunction, and a mental fogginess dubbed “chemo brain.” They also are at heightened risk for recurrence and secondary cancers.

Physical problems arise within individual cancer groups. For example, head and neck cancer patients often have trouble swallowing and lose their sense of taste. Breast cancer patients must deal with the changes that come as a result of a lumpectomy or mastectomy and reconstruction.

In addition, family and relationship problems may arise as all in a survivor’s relationship network struggle to adjust to cancer and life after cancer.  Emotional challenges abound, from sadness, fear, and anger to serious depression. Fatigue is common.

Winship Cancer Institute is helping survivors deal not only with the late physical effects of cancer but also with the psychological and social issues that are part of surviving.

“We are now defining a ‘new normal’ for these patients,” says Giblin. “There can be long-term after-effects when treated for cancer, and we are finding ways to improve their quality of life while providing guidance on strategies for dealing with these after-effects.”

The Winship Survivorship Program officially started in November, 2011. Already more than 10 Winship survivorship “clinics” are being offered, focusing on survivors of 10 different cancer categories. The program holds workshops on such vital topics as nutrition, preventing lymphedema, how to talk to children about cancer, spirituality and pet therapy. Workshops have been held on sexuality and also on fatigue. In May, Winship announced its collaboration with the YMCA of Metro Atlanta for a special exercise program for cancer survivors. A unique collaboration, Winship at the Y was Giblin’s brainchild. She is at the hub of a very extensive interdisciplinary wheel that involves specialists from a wide range of treatment areas, including nutrition, pain management, and psychiatry to help survivors thrive.

“We have to change how we look at cancer patients,” Giblin says. “Many cancers are not curable in a conventional sense, but the improvement in the quality and quantity of life needs to be our priority. Much as we view diabetes as a chronic condition, we must look at many cancers in the same way.”

Head and neck cancer survivor Barry Elson, 70, had difficulty swallowing after his treatment. Barry, who was first diagnosed in 2003, had an esophageal dilation last year to improve his ability to swallow.

“I think in the press of your day-to-day survivorship, you forget to ask what (the treatment) might do to your long-term quality of life,” Barry says.

Shawn found that exercise has not only helped her gain physical strength but also has helped her mental outlook. Shawn was able to exercise throughout most of her treatment, even as ill as she was. Now, her worst worry is fatigue. But that doesn’t slow her down. In her job as fitness manager at Blomeyer, she conducts “boot camp” training sessions and teaches other classes.

Winship is also helping survivors thrive by providing support services to help survivors cope with employment and insurance issues that arise as a result of their cancer.

“After treatment,” Giblin says, “patients tend to not be able to work as long, and they don’t have the stamina they used to have.” In addition, there can be stigma in the workplace against a cancer survivor, which in times of layoffs, can result in their loss of employment and consequently, loss of benefits.

“It’s the people who can’t afford to lose their jobs who do,” she says.

And even in cases where survivors keep their insurance benefits, they might find a lack of integrated care as they celebrate more birthdays.

Paper records are lost through the years, hospitals and oncology offices change and primary care physicians—who don’t have experience in oncology —aren’t prepared or educated to provide the ongoing care cancer survivors need.

Barry says he fared well—a result, in part, of diligent Winship physicians Amy Chen and Dong Moon Shin, and the nursing staff—including Giblin.

Despite the side effects she faced during treatment, Shawn says she has grown from her cancer experience.

It makes her a stronger survivor, she says, and also more hopeful, optimistic, and motivated.
“It’s almost motivated me to do more,” she says. “It really helps me to live day by day. You make every day everlasting.”

Original Article Source: Winship Magazine

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Healthy Holiday Eating Web Chat

‘Tis the season for indulgence, fa la la la la la la la laaaaa! With the holiday season upon us, it’s hard to resist the urge to overindulge. While it is important for everyone to know how to make healthy choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, incorporating the right foods a nutritional elements into one’s diet is especially important for cancer survivors. According to the National Cancer Institute, an individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis through the balance of his or her life. Understanding the role nutrition plays before, during, and after cancer treatment is critical to ensuring cancer survivors are as strong as possible through their journey in the fight against cancer.

Because nutritional recommendations can be very different for cancer patients than for the average healthy adult, Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, is hosting an online chat on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at noon EST to share her insights on optimal nutrition to support the journey in the fight against cancer.

Be proactive this holiday season and join Tiffany and our other chat participants to share tips, ideas, and get questions answered related to the best nutritional choices you can make this holiday season and beyond!

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Take-Aways from Cancer Survivorship: Intimacy Chat

Recently, we conducted a live chat within our cancer survivorship series: Cancer Survivorship and Intimacy. The chat was hosted by Alice Mullins, LCSW, of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s survivorship program and addressed a variety of topics related to cancer treatment, survivorship and intimacy.

Cancer treatments can wreak havoc on the mind and body, thus impacting how patients feel about affection and intimacy. Since the topic is often under-addressed, Alice was able to answer some of your most pressing questions.

All types of cancers, not just those of the reproductive organs, can have an impact on intimacy, as intimacy is not only physical but emotional as well. Patients undergoing cancer treatment may face a variety of issues with intimacy due to side-effects of treatment and medication. Alice recommended that chat participants experiencing such issues consult with their physician or counselor for support.

While there are several ways to increase sexual desire and intimacy among cancer patients and their partners, the most important step is to work on communication.

Alice reminded participants that prioritizing good communication and being open, both personally and with their partner, is key! What intimacy means and is constituted by may change for patients during or after cancer treatment, so keeping an open mind on ways to feel and experience intimacy is essential.

For more information and to review the full discussion the intimacy chat transcript is available today.

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Join Us for a Web Chat on Cancer Survivorship & Intimacy

Cancer Survivorship & IntimacyDon’t miss it! Up next in our series of Live Chats for cancer survivors and their families, we will focus on the topic of intimacy. Cancer treatments can wreak havoc on body and mind, thus impacting how we feel about affection and intimacy.

Alice Mullins from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s survivorship program will lead a discussion on this very important and often under-addressed topic.

Cancer Survivorship & Intimacy Web Chat Details:

Date: Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Time: 12:00 (noon) – 1:00 pm EST
Host: Alice Mullins, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University Survivorship Program
Topic: Cancer Survivorship – Intimacy TRANSCRIPT

Take-Aways on Cancer Survivorship & Support

Cancer Survivorship SupportWe recently held a live web chat with Joan Giblin, NP, Director of Survivorship at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. During the discussion, Joan answered questions about Winship’s survivorship programs and emphasized the importance of survivors, no matter what stage or walk of life, engaging in some form of survivorship program. Below you’ll find Joan’s main highlights from the chat discussion.

According to the National Cancer Institute, an individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis through the balance of his or her life. Family members, friends and caregivers are also impacted by the survivorship experience and are therefore included in this description.

At the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, we take survivorship seriously and have developed programs to help you navigate through your role as a “survivor.” The cancer journey is difficult enough to maneuver through, so our comprehensive and dedicated care team members are there for you each step of the way.

For some survivors, life during and after cancer takes getting used to. What was normal prior to diagnosis may not be the case after cancer treatment. Ongoing care and attention to maintain a healthy quality of life is recommended. It is important to surround yourself with people who are going to encourage you to heal, both physically and mentally.  Exercise, maintaining a proper diet and joining a support group are all activities that will help your body heal from the physical and emotional distress cancer may have caused.

At Winship, we provide support for all stages of survivorship. We update and post a monthly calendar, which lists the support groups, community outreach events and services offered through Winship’s survivorship program. Support groups are available based on age, gender, type of cancer, etc. There are also groups specific to family members and caretakers of cancer survivors.

Recently, Winship partnered with the YMCA of Metro Atlanta to provide survivors with better access to exercise programs in closer range of their homes. Called Winship at the Y, this program is a collaboration unlike any other in the country. Winship staff including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, social workers and dieticians will train YMCA wellness coaches and staff on the specific fitness and exercises needs of cancer survivors.

So whether you just received the news of your cancer diagnosis, or you’re 30 years in remission, Winship offers support programs for every type of “survivor.” For more information on all our programs, please feel free to email me at survivorship@emoryhealthcare.org. If you missed the live chat, but would like to see the full discussion, the chat transcript is available now to view.

Author: Joan Giblin, Director of Survivorship Program at the Winship Cancer Institute

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