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When it Comes to Cancer, Beauty is More than Skin Deep

Elizabeth Goodman shares her experience at Winship’s Radiance Boutique

Emory Radiance Boutique“The most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched; they must be felt with the heart.” This quote by Helen Keller perfectly describes The Radiance Boutique at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, which offers up a feeling of beauty that is much more than skin deep and is most definitely felt with the heart. This boutique is no place to find overpriced designer clothing or useless knick-knacks; it is stocked to the brim with wigs, compression garments, and mastectomy bras and prostheses to heal beyond a medical level.

As the Boutique coordinator and certified professional I spend my days measuring, fitting and offering garments to men and women of all ages to help them maintain their dignity and find hope for normalcy on their journey toward recovery. Being present for such an emotional transition in these patients’ lives gives me the opportunity to be more like a guide and a counselor than a salesperson, offering advice on getting through these difficult times and armed with an arsenal of items to help our patients along the way.

Unfortunately, I am no stranger to the heartbreak of cancer. My father was diagnosed with and treated at Winship for lung cancer. Although he lost his battle with cancer in August 2003, my experience with my dad allows me to connect and empathize with our patients and their families as they are going through their experience. My passion for health care and patient interaction led me into this field. Every day allows me the opportunity to use my expertise of the health care industry and my product knowledge of all kinds of prosthetics. At the boutique we provide a wide range of products, including:

Wigs

Most frequently associated with the boutique is our huge variety of wigs. Between synthetic, real hair and customized, the boutique offers the best wigs found in the country. The wigs are made from real hair and can be brushed and styled like natural hair.

The patient’s cap size is measured, and hair is ordered to match the natural hair. After treatment has begun, the patient can go to a hair dresser, have his or her hair shaved off, and then have the wig styled the same way the natural hair was styled. Of course, if the patient would rather change hair style or color, there are several wigs in stock at the boutique ranging in texture, fit, color and cut.

Compression Garments

Compression sleeves and socks are fashioned to provide the perfect amount of constriction on different parts of the leg or arm to increase circulation. For patients suffering from vascular problems, compression garments can be immensely helpful.

Mastectomy Bras and Prostheses

Many patients come for help after having mastectomies during battles with breast cancer. With forms in all sorts of shapes, sizes and colors, our products go a long way in making these women feel beautiful again. The prostheses also can prevent irreversible back problems that often persist from the weight of unevenly carrying only one breast. I often meet with women in pre-surgery consultations show and discuss options available to them after lumpectomies, reconstruction and mastectomies. A commonly requested item is a post-surgical camisole, which features drain pouches for immediate use after such a surgery. They look like tank tops and blend comfortably into any patient’s wardrobe.

The Radiance Boutique is open to patients Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and is located in the Patient and Family Resource Center at Winship Cancer Institute. For more information or to set up an appointment, call us at 404-778-1264.

Could Space Travel Cause Lung Cancer in Astronauts?

Researchers are launching a new cancer research initiative – literally. NASA partners with Emory & MCG

NASA has awarded a team of investigators from both the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and the Medical College of Georgia $7.6 million over five years to study how a component of space radiation may induce lung cancer.

The award establishes a NASA Specialized Center of Research (NSCOR), consisting of a team of scientists with complementary skills who work closely together to solve a set of research questions. Ya Wang, PhD, professor of radiation oncology at Emory University School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute, is director of the NSCOR at Emory.

Interplanetary space travel could expose astronauts to conditions where they are chronically subject to types of radiation not normally encountered on earth. One of these radiation types is high energy charged particles (HZE), which results in complex damage to DNA and a broader stress response by the affected cells and tissues.

There is no epidemiological data for human exposure to HZE particles, although some estimates have been made studying uranium miners and Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Animal experiments show that HZE particle exposure induces more tumors than other forms of radiation such as X-rays or gamma rays.

Because it is a leading form of cancer, lung cancer can be expected to be prominent among increased risks from radiation even though astronauts do not smoke. However, the risk for astronauts remains unclear because the dose of HZE astronauts are expected to receive is very low.

The Emory-MCG researchers will probe whether the broader stress response induced by HZE particles amplifies cancer risk. Investigators will collaborate with physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory to gather information on HZE’s effects. Individual projects include the study of how cells repair DNA damage induced by HZE particles, how HZE particles generate oxidative stress, and how they trigger regulatory changes in DNA known as methylation.

“The information generated by this project will be critical for estimating risks and establishing countermeasures for cancers associated with long term space travel. In addition, new insights into cancer resulting from all types of radiation exposure, including those found on earth, are likely to emerge from this project,” concludes Dr. Paul Doetsch, PhD, professor of radiation oncology and biochemistry, and associate director of Emory’s NSCOR.

Wear Purple to Show Your Support, November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

Pancreatic CancerLung cancer gets a lot of attention during November, but did you know that November is also Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month?

If you’ve seen a lot of people wearing purple this month, they’re doing it to raise awareness for pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cancer killer in the United States. The color represents more than 32,000 Americans who will be diagnosed with the disease this year and almost as many who will die because of it by year’s end.

Pancreatic cancer affects the pancreas, an organ located in the abdomen that helps to make enzymes for food digestion. Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect because the symptoms such as weight loss, fatigue, and abdominal discomfort are vague and associated with many other illnesses. When the pancreas produces too much insulin, other symptoms such as chills, diarrhea, general feelings of weakness, and muscle spasms may also be experienced. But these symptoms rarely occur in the early stages of the disease and they set in gradually, causing it to go untreated and producing devastatingly low survival rates.

If a doctor suspects pancreatic cancer, imaging tests may be done to gain a better view of the pancreas. But according to Charles Staley, MD, chief of surgical oncology at Emory University School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, “Pancreatic tumors are difficult to image because they don’t show up very well on CT scans and MRI.”

In an effort to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in its earlier states, Emory researchers have tested a molecule that specifically binds pancreatic cancer cells to tiny “nanoparticles” made of iron oxide. The iron makes the particles clearly visible under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). If the tumor can be imaged better, radiation or chemotherapy may be able to be put into these particles to deliver them directly to the tumor. This could eventually mean higher survival rates.

There is no proven way to prevent pancreatic cancer, but researchers have identified several risk factors. Smokers are two to three time more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than non-smokers and African-Americans are diagnosed more frequently than other races. Increased age, diabetes, chronic pancreatitis and a family history of pancreatic cancer are also common risk factors.

To hear more from Dr. Staley on how he treats patients with rare cancers, listen to his podcast.

You can also visit the Winship Cancer Institute’s website to get more resources on pancreatic cancer, including its diagnosis and treatment.

Can a CT Scan Save 32,000 Lives? The Answer May be ‘Yes’

Lung CT ScanWhat if there were a way for 32,000 of the 160,000 lives lost each year related to cigarette smoking to be saved? There may just be. Findings from a recent study show the risk of dying from lung cancer could be reduced by 20 percent by use of a low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scan. In other words, this type of CT screening could save over 30,000 lives a year.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, and as such, cancer research and treatment experts are constantly looking for ways to reduce the pervasive nature of the disease. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched the multi-center National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) in 2002. The trial compared two ways of detecting lung cancer using low dose helical (spiral) CT vs a standard chest X-Ray. Part of this research study was actually led at Emory by radiologist and researcher Dr. Kay Vydareny.

The trial aimed to determine the effects of low-dose helical CT scans vs chest X-Rays on lung cancer death rates in high-risk populations. Both chest X-rays and helical CT scans have been used as a means to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined.

Over a 20-month period, more than 53,000 current or former heavy smokers ages 55 to 74 joined NLST at 33 study sites across the United States. In November 2010, the initial findings from NLST were released. The conclusion? Clinical trial participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20 percent lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.

While the benefits of low-dose helical CT scans in the reduction of lung cancer deaths are obvious, not every diagnostic option comes completely risk free. The CT scans can occasionally detect suspicious abnormalities that do not turn out to be lung cancer – known as false positives. Many of these abnormalities are scars from smoking, areas of inflammation or other noncancerous conditions that may require additional testing to determine that they are not harmful. These tests have been known to cause undue anxiety for patients and may sometimes lead to biopsies or surgeries.

“It is certainly an individual’s choice whether they want to be screened for lung cancer with a CT scan if they have no symptoms. However, it is important to make certain that such individuals have complete information and be well-informed before having such a scan. If a patient has symptoms, such as a persistent cough, weight loss, persistent hoarseness or trouble breathing, he or she should see a physician as soon as possible. Often these symptoms are due to something other than lung cancer, but more tests should be performed to make certain,” says Vydareny.

What should a person at high-risk for lung cancer do? The answer that all physicians agree on is to stop smoking right now, the sooner the better. Or even better … don’t start smoking ever, further reducing the chances of getting cancer or suffering from a stroke or heart attack as well.

“All physicians hope that there will be a test that can screen for early lung cancer and that the dismal prognosis of those with lung cancer will improve. Perhaps it will be screening with CT scans. Perhaps it will be a blood test,” says Vydareny. “That day hopefully will come, but it has not yet arrived. But if you are or have been a heavy smoker, your first step should be to consult your primary care physician to discuss all possible screening options.”

For more information, check out the lung cancer screening clinical trial video below:

Make Your Plans to Quit Smoking

American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout is scheduled for November 18th.

Smoking cessation represents the single most important step that smokers can take to enhance the length and quality of their lives.  That’s why smokers all over the country are encouraged to participate in the American Cancer Society’s 35th Great American Smokeout on November 18, 2010 and take this opportunity to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day.  Not only does the event challenge people to stop using tobacco, it helps to raise awareness about the dangers of smoking and the many effective ways available to permanently quit smoking .

The numbers are astounding.  According to the American Cancer Society, smoking cigarettes kills more Americans every year than alcohol, car accidents, suicide, AIDS, homicide and illegal drugs combined.  Smoking is responsible for almost nine out of 10 lung cancer deaths – a disease that is extremely hard to treat but could often be prevented by avoiding tobacco use and secondhand smoke.

Nicotine is as addictive as heroin or cocaine, so successful quitting is a matter of planning and commitment, not luck.  For most people, the best way to quit is to attack not only the physical symptoms of nicotine withdrawal but the mental/emotional aspects of quitting as well.  A combination of medicine, a method to change personal habits, and emotional support will encourage success.

The benefits of quitting begin immediately.  Just 20 minutes after your last cigarette your heart rate and blood pressure drops.  Within hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.  Over the following weeks, months and years your overall health increases and your risk of heart disease, lung and other types of cancer decreases.   And on top of all that, food will taste better, your teeth will get whiter, your sense of smell will return to normal, and everyday activities will no longer leave you out of breath!

To get help making your plans to quit on November 18th, contact our Lung Cancer Program at (404)778-PINK or (404)-778-7465.

Breast Health – Not Just for October

Enter our Breast Health Contest

Enter to Win Breast Health Contest
As the second most common cancer affecting women (13% of all women will develop breast cancer in their lives), breast cancer is a prevalent disease that deserves attention year round, not just during the month of October. We’ve intentionally made our breast health contest and the resources you’ll find here available starting in the month of November to demonstrate our commitment to year-round awareness. To encourage participation in this year round effort, we’re asking for your help and feedback.

With 1 in every 8 women being affected by breast cancer during their lives, chances are you have been touched by breast cancer at some point in your life. Whether this happened via a friend or family member who won the fight against breast cancer, or participation in fundraisers or campaigns to raise awareness, or if you yourself have or are battling breast cancer, we would love to hear your story.

If you have thoughts, tips, advice, words of inspiration, or even just an idea for how to promote breast cancer awareness, we want to hear from you! Better yet, tell us how you’re promoting breast cancer awareness. Visit our breast health contest page and share your feedback. Two winning entries will be selected and the winners will receive tickets for a special surprise event. If you’re interested, check out contest details and share your story! You’ll never know how many lives you can change or touch with your feedback until you give it a try.

Deadline for submission is November 17th. Winners will be notified November 18th.

Enter the breast health contest …all it takes is a quick comment.

Welcome to the Emory Healthcare Cancer Blog!

Welcome to Emory Healthcare’s new cancer blog! We’re glad to be a part of the innovative developments taking place at Emory Healthcare and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, and we are looking forward to sharing helpful cancer information and resources with our community and the Web.

While cancer can be scary and overwhelming, we’re doing everything we can to help improve the quality of life and survivorship of our cancer patients at Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute.

The posts you’ll find on this blog will come from physicians, patients, and staff of the Winship Cancer Institute and will span a broad range of topics. We will provide tips, advice, information about medical advances and new innovations in cancer treatment, survivorship resources, patient success stories and more.

The Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is the only National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated cancer treatment center in Atlanta or the state of Georgia. As such, the cancer care provided by Winship at Emory is rooted in the latest medical research and advancements to ensure we provide the best possible patient care available.

Our goal is to treat cancer and seek the best possible outcomes for our patients, and to accompany our patients through their cancer journey from beginning to end, which often involves a lifetime of support. We want our patients to live the best quality life possible both during and after treatment and we are committed to providing the survivorship support and resources to help them do so.

Our cancer blog is an opportunity to bring awareness to the amazing medical advances in cancer treatment being made at Emory, but also to share success stories of our patients and their medical teams. We encourage you to subscribe to our blog feed and use the comments to share your feedback, questions, or suggestions for blog topics that interest you.