What is Radiation Therapy and How is it Used to Treat Cancer?

Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that is used to shrink tumors and stop the growth of cancer cells. High energy x-rays are aimed directly at cancerous cells or tumors. According to the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the technique is so effective in treating many different types of cancer that nearly two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy at some time during the course of their cancer treatment.

Depending on the type of cancer being treated, radiation may be used as a stand-alone treatment and often it is the only treatment needed. Or, it may be used in combination with surgery, chemotherapy and/or other targeted therapies. For example, doctors may use radiation therapy to shrink a tumor before surgery, or after surgery to stop the growth of any cancer cells that may be left behind.

Watch the video below to learn about the types of radiation treatments available to patients at Winship Cancer Institute:

Visit the new mobile-friendly Emory Radiation Oncology website to learn more about treatments and services offered in the Department of Radiation Oncology and what to expect as a new patient.

About Dr. Godette

Karen Godette, MDKaren Godette, MD, is a board certified radiation oncologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Godette practices general radiation oncology and specializes in breast and gynecological malignancies, prostate cancer and soft tissue sarcoma. Within these areas, her expertise is brachytherapy. Dr. Godette treats patients at Winship at Emory University Hospital Midtown where she has served as medical director since 2001.

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