Posts Tagged ‘clinical trials questions’

New Website Makes Searching For Emory Clinical Trials Easier

cthp-250x250We are thrilled to announce the launch of a new Emory clinical trials website! The new site – clinicaltrials.emory.edu – features easy-to-access information for nearly 1,000 active clinical trials at Emory that are currently seeking volunteers.

Potential clinical trial participants may easily search for trials related to a specific health condition or browse by topic areas such as cardiology, cancer, or neurosciences and view quick facts about each of the individual trials. While many clinical trials are seeking patients who have a particular disease, many others are seeking healthy volunteers.

“Emory’s ability to develop improved therapies through clinical research is a key component of our clinical mission and gives patients access to the most advanced treatments available,” says Jeffrey Lennox, MD, associate dean for clinical research in Emory University School of Medicine. “This new clinical trials website will allow more people within Emory and the broader community to learn about and participate in the wide range of available clinical trials.”

What Information Is Included On The New Website?

Each clinical trial listing includes information on its purpose, timing, key investigators, process, and eligibility criteria. For additional information, potential volunteers may click on a link to send a message the leader of each individual trial. Emory trials will continue to be listed in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) clinical trials database – clinicaltrials.gov– which provides more detailed information.

If you wish to learn more about clinical trials in general, the new website also includes frequently asked questions about volunteering, information on additional resources at Emory for potential participants, and NIH information about clinical trials.

The Value Of Clinical Trials

Medical advances and improvements to clinical care have been made possible the participation of volunteers in clinical trials. Some studies test new drugs or surgical procedures and devices, while others look for better ways to prevent diseases in people who have either never had a disease or are trying to prevent one from coming back. Other types of trials help find ways to improve the care and quality of life of people with long-term illnesses and diseases.

People choose to participate in clinical trials for a variety of reasons. Current patients may participate in order to receive care and potentially benefit from a new therapy. Healthy volunteers may participate in clinical trials to help current and future patients and to contribute to help researchers find better treatments.

For more information on clinical trials at Emory, please ask your Emory physician or call the Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777.

 

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Understanding Clinical Trials – Part 4: What Questions Should You Ask Before Enrolling in a Clinical Trial?

Clinical Trials QuestionsParticipation in clinical trials is 100% voluntary. While there are many benefits to participating in clinical trials, there can also be risks. If you have been offered a clinical trial, or are considering participating, it is important to talk with your physician before enrolling in one. Your health care team wants to make sure you have all the information needed to make a decision.

Do not hesitate to ask any questions or bring up any issues concerning the trial with the research team associated with the clinical trial. Tips for asking about clinical trials include:

  • Take a family member or caregiver with you for support and for help in asking questions and recording answers.
  • Plan questions ahead of time — you can still ask new questions you think of while you’re there, but it helps to be prepared ahead of time.
  • Write down your questions in advance, to make sure you remember to ask them all.
  • Write down the answers, so that you can review them whenever you want.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a list of suggestions that may be helpful to review as you think about the questions you may have:

Questions about the Study

  • What is the purpose?
  • Why do researchers think the approach may be effective?
  • Who will fund the study?
  • Who has reviewed and approved the study?
  • How are study results and safety of participants being checked?
  • How long will the study last?
  • What will my responsibilities be if I participate?

Questions about Possible Risks/Benefits

  • What are my possible short-term benefits?
  • What are my possible long-term benefits?
  • What are my short-term risks, such as side effects?
  • What are my possible long-term risks?
  • What other options do people with my disease have?
  • How do the possible risks and benefits of this trial compare with those options?

Questions about Participation and Care

  • What kinds of therapies, procedures and /or tests will I have during the trial?
  • Will they hurt, and if so, for how long?
  • How do the tests in the study compare with those I would have outside of the trial?
  • Will I be able to take my regular medications while in the clinical trial?
  • Where will I have my medical care?
  • Who will be in charge of my care?

Questions about Personal Health Issues

  • How could being in this study affect my daily life?
  • Can I talk to other people in the study?

Questions about Financial Issues

  • Will I have to pay for any part of the trial such as tests or the study drug?
  • If so, what will the charges likely be?
  • What is my health insurance likely to cover?
  • Who can help answer any questions from my insurance company or health plan?
  • Will there be any travel or child care costs that I need to consider while I am in the trial?

At Emory Healthcare, our physicians and researchers want to answer all your questions about clinical trials and research. View some of our frequently asked questions, or hear from our patients who have gone through clinical trials.

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