News

Emory Johns Creek Hospital Earns Chest Pain Center Accreditation

Chest Pain Accreditation Emory Johns Creek HospitalCongratulations to Emory Johns Creek Hospital, which has received Chest Pain Center with PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention) from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC). This achievement signifies that Emory Johns Creek meets or exceeds quality-of-care measures in patients who arrive at the hospital with symptoms of a heart attack.

“We are so proud of the phenomenal work by this multidisciplinary team,” says Marilyn Margolis, MN, RN, Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s chief nursing officer and vice president of operations.” This accreditation shows our ability to provide the community with the best heart care available.”

To achieve Chest Pain Center Accreditation, the hospital engaged in rigorous evaluation by the SCPC for its ability to assess, diagnose and treat patients who may be experiencing symptoms that indicate heart disease or a heart attack. It also has demonstrated that it has processes in place that meet strict criteria to help:

  • Detect and treat symptoms that may lead to a heart attack, thus avoiding a heart attack and therefore avoiding heart damage.
  • Provide the community with education and information about early heart attack care to improve wellness and the quality of life.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital is one of three hospitals in the Emory Healthcare system to achieve Chest Pain Center Accreditation. Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown are accredited Chest Pain Centers. Hospitals must reapply for their designation every three years.

“It took a team of dedicated people across many hospital departments and services to achieve Chest Pain Center Accreditation at Emory Johns Creek Hospital,” says Craig McCoy, CEO of Emory Johns Creek Hospital. “We are excited about this designation and know it will benefit many patients during the critical and early stages of a heart attack and throughout their recovery.”

As great as this news is for Emory Johns Creek Hospital, what it means for Emory Johns Creek’s patients is what’s most important, says Jeffery Hershey, MD, who serves as chair of the Division of Cardiology and chief of medicine at Emory Johns Creek. “Heart patients at Emory Johns Creek Hospital can expect a continuum of care from the very start of the patient’s symptoms until discharge from the hospital,” Hershey says. “This includes care starting with emergency dispatch to EMS in the field to the emergency department to the cath lab to the observation unit to cardiac rehab and through discharge from the facility. We have enhanced the quality of care for cardiac patients and are committed to these higher standards of care.”

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Emory Nurses are Amazing! Emory University Hospital Receives Prestigious Magnet Designation!

Emory University Hospital Magnet DesignationCongratulations to Emory University Hospital, who just received designation as a Magnet® facility from the American Nurses Credentialing Center! This outstanding achievement is a significant milestone for Emory University Hospital and the culmination of the relentless pursuit of excellence on the part of our nurses, physicians and staff.

So, what does Magnet mean to you, our patients? Magnet designation means that:

  • We’re all in this together. Our nurses work in a collaborative environment and benefit from each other’s knowledge and breadth of experience.
  • Our nurses are the cream of the crop! Magnet facilities regularly attract and retain top nursing talent.
  • You can feel confident that you’re in good hands. The Magnet Recognition Program establishes standards of excellence which health care organizations like ours must attain and maintain.

We’re particularly proud that with this recent recognition, Emory Healthcare becomes the only health system in Georgia to have two hospitals designated as Magnet facilities – Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, and now, Emory University Hospital! Currently, there are fewer than 400 Magnet-designated facilities around the globe, and six of those are in the state of Georgia. We couldn’t be prouder that Emory University Hospital has joined the ranks of these distinguished facilities!

We’d also like to thank all of our amazing nurses and nursing leaders for their perseverance and dedication on our road to Magnet designation. If you have an Emory nurse you’d like to give a special shout out to, let us know!

Emory Healthcare Partners with National Testing Provider, HealthFair

Mobile Health Screening Bus

Emory Healthcare is pleased to announce a new partnership with HealthFair – a national testing provider that brings convenient and affordable health testing to community neighborhoods via its mobile screening buses. HealthFair is a Joint Commission-accredited mobile screening company that works with academic medical centers as well as community hospitals across the United States.

Beginning January 2014, Emory Healthcare will collaborate with HealthFair to provide cardiovascular screenings to organizations and communities in the Atlanta area. Mammography screenings will be available in the Spring of 2014.

Screening plans are tailored to the needs of the participant, and all tests are read and evaluated by Emory Healthcare physicians. This collaboration will provide metro Atlanta communities with greater access to important screening services and to Emory Healthcare physicians and providers.

Upcoming screening dates and locations:

  • January 20, Rite Aid – Kennesaw
  • January 21, LA Fitness – Douglasville
  • January 22, Fitness 19 – Woodstock
  • January 23, Walgreens – Atlanta
  • January 24, CVS – Dacula
  • January 25, Just Fitness 4U – Marietta
  • January 27, Publix – Powder Springs
  • January 28, Parc at Piedmont East Cobb – Marietta
  • January 29, Dogwood Forest- Fayetteville
  • January 30, Kroger – Atlanta
  • January 31, Walgreens – Kennesaw
  • February 1, Publix – Covington
  • February 4, Walgreens – Alpharetta

For more information on the different screening options and/or to schedule your screening appointment, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/screening.

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GHA Honors Emory’s Marilyn Margolis with Lifetime Achievement Award

Marilyn Margolis

This year, the Georgia Hospital Association (GHA) awarded its 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award to Marilyn Margolis, chief nursing officer and vice president of patient services and operations at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

“It was an honor and a surprise when I found out about the award,” Margolis says. “It deeply touched me because I consider it a privilege to do the work for which I’m getting recognized.” Emory Johns Creek’s CEO Craig McCoy nominated Margolis for the award.

Her “work” is an understated reference to a 30-plus year career with Emory Healthcare that has included positions as staff leader of Emory University Hospital’s Coronary Care Unit, unit director of Emory University Hospital’s Emergency Department, director of nursing for Emory Healthcare’s Emergency Services and Emory University Hospital’s neurosciences department, director of nursing operations for Emory University Hospital, and her current roles at Emory Johns Creek, where she collaborates with all providers and oversees the hospital’s operational and clinical functions.

“I’ve been extremely fortunate to work with incredibly talented and dedicated people in the Emory system,” says Margolis. “The support from Emory’s administration and the opportunity to work collaboratively with a number of great teams is what has really helped move some major projects forward that made positive impacts on patient care.”

A few of those major projects include:

  • Development of continuous-improvement programs to enhance patient safety, increase nursing staff retention and reduce nurse-to-patient ratios, including a reorganization of Emory University Hospital’s ER admissions process at and the development of an “express care” line, which improved patient safety (1999).
  • Creation of the Family Coordinator role and mechanisms that allow patients’ family members to provide input and voice concerns about the patients care. These initiatives were recognized as best practices at many conferences, including the Institute for Patient and Family Centered Care. The program received multiple awards and was featured in the New York Times (2002).
  • Implementation of University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) best practices at Emory, resulting in system-wide improvements and UHC recognition (2002).
  • Successful certification and accreditation initiatives, including The Joint Commission’s Primary Stroke Center certification for Emory University Hospital (2008, 2010) and Emory Johns Creek Hospital (2011); and accreditation with commendation for Emory Johns Creek’s cancer program (2013).  She is currently leading efforts to ready Emory Johns Creek Hospital for Magnet Hospital certification.

Margolis credits numerous mentors who provided her with guidance and learning opportunities throughout her Emory career. “If you’re open to constant education and open communication, the opportunities are limitless at Emory. It’s truly a gift to work here,” she says.

Remembering Dr. John “Jack” Culbertson

Dr. John Culbertson Jr.It is with great sadness we inform you that Dr. John “Jack” Culbertson passed away when a plane he was piloting went down in North Georgia. Words cannot explain our sadness at this unexpected and tragic loss.

Dr. Culbertson was a remarkable Emory physician for more than 25 years and served as Chief of Plastic Surgery at Emory University Hospital Midtown. He was a member of multiple national societies, contributing to numerous publications and textbooks, and lectured nationally and internationally.

He was a steadfast and giving human being, and, for many years, dedicated his time to provide instruction and perform surgery at Navajo reservations. To quote his partner and friend Dr. Grant Carlson, “We are fortunate to have people like Jack Culbertson in the world. He always reminded us that life is special and should be treated as such. His easygoing demeanor and infectious smile will be missed.”

Please join us in remembering Dr. Culbertson and celebrating his life. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends. He will be deeply missed by his entire Emory family, including faculty, staff and his many patients.

 

Patients with questions are welcome to call is Melissa Schuermann, Business Manager of the Emory Aesthetic Center at (404) 778-7243.

Emory University Hospital Applies for American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Designation

Emory University Hospital AtlantaEmory University Hospital has applied to the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for the prestigious designation of Magnet.  The Magnet designation recognizes excellence in nursing services.

You can learn more about our application to the American Nurses Credentialing  Center (ANCC) for the prestigious designation of Magnet by viewing the Public Notice of Application.

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Moving On Up – Emory Healthcare Continues to Deliver on Quality Promise

Best Hospitals Quality 2013As a friend of Emory Healthcare, you’ve likely been following our road to better deliver quality patient care. In 2006, we challenged ourselves to land in the University HealthSystem Consortium’s (UHC) top 10 ranking. In 2012, we met our goal as Emory University Hospital (combined with Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital) ranked number two and Emory University Hospital Midtown ranked number six. Today, we’re proud to announce that our journey didn’t stop there. Once again the only health care system in the nation to have two hospitals in the top 10 UHC simultaneously, Emory Healthcare congratulates Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown for ranking second and third, respectively!

A top ranking by UHC means more than just great care. Since UHC ranks only academic medical centers that typically treat more complex patients than most hospitals, making their top ten list of the 101 participants reflects the ultimate assessment of organizational performance in setting the standard in quality and safety. Essentially, they’re comparing apples to apples. As a patient, you can pick the best place for your family while resting assured that you’re receiving the highest quality care. We’re quite proud to be listed among our peer institutions from all over the country who also are committed to keeping Americans healthy by providing quality care.

We’re All In This Together: Meet Our New Brand!

Emory Healthcare New Brand

If you’re reading this blog or have visited the Emory Healthcare website recently, you may have noticed something a bit different. Our logo and website of yesterday are gone, and in their place is the shiny new look of the Emory Healthcare brand.

But a brand is more than a logo, more than a trademark, more than a mission. Our brand is a promise- a promise to live up to our goals, serve our community, and hold ourselves accountable in providing the standard of care our patients and families expect and deserve.

Every year we make strides in care innovation, quality outcomes and community health, because every year, we set goals that hold us accountable to our community. The residents of Atlanta and the state of Georgia depend on Emory Healthcare and the Emory Healthcare Network of providers, clinics and hospitals, to deliver on our promise.

We could tell you that Emory University Hospital was ranked as the best hospital in Atlanta in 2013, or that over 50% of the “Top Doctors” in Atlanta are Emory physicians, or that we are the only health care system to have two hospitals simultaneously rank in the nation’s top 10 for quality; but the truth is, these honors and accolades are only evidence of our promise to deliver, but that promise lies in each of us.

From one of our transplant nurses donating her own kidney to a patient in need, to our human resource team members stepping in as cooks during the Atlanta Snowpocalypse, to our Winship physicians running side-by-side to support their patients in raising money for the fight against cancer, it is our team that is our brand.

We are Emory and we are not afraid to challenge the status quo. We’re not afraid to tackle the most difficult cases and questions. We’re not afraid to lead the discussion on what’s broken about our nation’s healthcare, instead, we’re looking forward to playing a part in fixing it. We’re not afraid to discover new cures and treatments and share them with the world.

We are researchers and teachers discovering what’s next in medicine and improving health today. We are practitioners taking exceptional, compassionate care of our communities. We are a dedicated team, 16,000 strong, committed to sharing our skills and our knowledge, combining our strengths, and working together – for and with patients – to help you and your loved ones be well.

We live our promise every day, and we will continue to do so for our community. After all….We’re all in this together.

Emory HealthcareLearn More About Our New Brand!

 
 
 
 

Tips for Bouncing Back from the Baby Bump After Childbirth

Kate MiddletonThe Duchess of Cambridge, a.k.a. Kate Middleton, may have set yet another new fashion craze: wearing the post-baby bump with pride.

Judging from global chatter, Kate’s departure from St. Mary’s Hospital looking like a woman who, well, just gave birth was delightfully refreshing to many, and served as a healthy reminder just how beautiful “natural” can be.

Though a number of celebrity post-partum appearances had us believing that women could go from ravaged to ravishing in 10 easy days, the reality is the body just doesn’t bounce back that fast.

Dr. Gregory Fountain, OB/GYN at Emory Johns Creek Obstetrics and Gynecology says immediately after childbirth, the uterus is still the size it was when it held a 20-week old fetus, and it can take about 6 weeks for the uterus to return to normal size.

Additionally, most women tend to gain between 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy, Fountain explains. Though a lot comes out at birth, the actual weight loss depends on the baby’s size, the weight of the placenta and the amount of fluid. The amount lost generally equals 10 to 12 pounds, he says.

So that leaves a new mom with a few extra pounds to shed and a bunch of Google results on how to lose those pounds fast. As tempting as those baby bump-busting methods may seem, doctors usually tell women to hold off on vigorous exercise for about 6 weeks after delivery if they have had uncomplicated vaginal or cesarean births. The window may be longer if there were complications. Fountain advocates walking as a new mom’s primary form of exercise.

He also points out breast-feeding burns about 500 calories a day. This great mother-baby activity also releases a hormone called oxytocin into the bloodstream, which causes smooth muscle in both the breasts and the uterine to contract. Lactation experts say the uterine contractions caused during breast feeding can help tone the uterus.

Ultimately, Fountain says, women should set a more realistic goal of three to six months before the return to their pre-pregnancy weight, but that the time frame depends on a woman’s motivation and schedule.

The reality is that most new moms are exhausted and time -trapped in the first six to eight weeks after delivery and most weren’t marathon runners prior to pregnancy. Kay Halbert, Occupational Therapist, Rehab Therapy Services Supervisor at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, recommends women “develop habits that will serve them well from early ‘post-partum-hood’ through empty nesting.”

She even has a no-crunch-required tummy tightening exercise. “The key to a flat tummy is consistently engaging the deep abdominal muscles,” Halbert says. “You can do this throughout your day. In the beginning it will take concentration and mindfulness, but eventually it will be a sub-cortical mindless habit.”

“Sit or stand up straight, shoulders pulled back and down, tighten your belly and pull in your stomach. Imagine your belly button being drawn to your spine,” she advises. Her tip for making this a habit is to tie a string around your waist with your belly tight and keep the string there all day. When you relax or let go of your abdominal muscles the string tightens, reminding you to pull your abs tight again.”

Whatever activity women choose, Halbert advises that women listen to their doctor as to when it’s safe to begin exercising.

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Emory Hospitals Shine in National, State & Local Hospital Rankings – Emory University Hospital Named Best Hospital in Atlanta and State of Georgia

Best Hospitals in AtlantaAfter surveying nearly 10,000 specialists and sifting through data from approximately 5,000 hospitals, U.S. News & World Report has announced its 2013-14 rankings of America’s Best Hospitals and once again, our Emory hospitals have been placed among the best in the country, and Emory University Hospital has been honored as the best hospital in both the metro Atlanta area, and the state of Georgia.

Hospitals honored were ranked nationally in 16 adult specialties (e.g. cancer and urology) and also ranked regionally by city and state. Out of 60 hospitals in metro Atlanta, only eight hospitals were ranked as Atlanta’s best, and just 19 hospitals ranked this year out of 187 in the state of Georgia.

According to U.S. News, death rates, patient safety, and hospital reputation were just a few of the factors evaluated. Less than 150 hospitals were ranked nationally in one or more specialties. Learn more about how each of Emory’s hospitals performed in this year’s best hospital rankings:

Emory University Hospital – #1 in Atlanta, #1 in Georgia, Nationally Ranked in 5 Specialties, High Performer in 10 Specialties

Emory University Hospital AtlantaFor the second year in a row, U.S. News & World Report lists Emory University Hospital as the best hospital in Atlanta and the state of Georgia in its 2013-2014 Best Hospitals guide. (Emory University Hospital includes Wesley Woods Geriatric Hospital and Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital.)

>> Emory University Hospital Website

Emory University Hospital by the Numbers:

  • #1 Hospital in Atlanta
  • #1 Hospital in Georgia
  • Nationally Ranked in 5 Specialties:
  • High Performer in 10 Specialties:
    • Diabetes and endocrinology
    • Ear, nose and throat
    • Gastroenterology and GI surgery
    • Geriatrics
    • Gynecology
    • Nephrology
    • Orthopaedics
    • Pulmonary
    • Rheumatology
    • Urology

Emory University Hospital Midtown – #3 in Atlanta, #4 in Georgia, High Performer in 12 Specialties

Emory University Hospital Midtown AtlantaEmory University Hospital Midtown moved up a slot in each category from last year’s best hospital rankings, honored this year as 3rd in metro Atlanta and 4th in Georgia. Emory University Hospital was also honored as a high performing hospital in 12 different specialty areas.

 >>Emory University Hospital Midtown website

Emory University Hospital Midtown by the Numbers:

  • 3rd Best Hospital in Atlanta
  • 4th Best Hospital in Georgia
  • High Performer in 12 Specialties:
    • Cancer
    • Cardiology and heart surgery
    • Diabetes and endocrinology
    • Ear, nose and throat
    • Gastroenterology and GI surgery
    • Geriatrics
    • Gynecology
    • Nephrology
    • Neurology and neurosurgery
    • Orthopaedics
    • Pulmonary
    • Urology

Saint Joseph’s Hospital – #5 in Atlanta, #12 in Georgia, High Performer in 3 Specialties

Saint Joseph's Hospital AtlantaSaint Joseph’s Hospital ranks 5th in metro Atlanta (up from 7th last year) and 12th in the state of Georgia in U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 guide to the nation’s best hospitals. Saint Joseph’s Hospital was also listed as a high performing hospital in three specialty areas.

 >> Saint Joseph’s Hospital website

Saint Joseph’s Hospital by the Numbers:

  • Fifth Best Hospital in Atlanta
  • Twelfth Best Hospital in Georgia
  • High Performer in 3 Specialties:
    • Gastroenterology and GI surgery
    • Geriatrics
    • Nephrology

U.S. News & World Report publishes Best Hospitals to help guide patients who need a high level of care because they face particularly difficult surgery, a challenging condition, or added risk because of other health problems or age. Three weighted factors are used to rank hospitals, including hospital structure, reputation and outcomes.

The specialty rankings and data were produced for U.S. News by RTI International, a leading research organization based in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Using the same data, U.S. News produced the state and metro rankings.

The rankings have been published at www.health.usnews.com/best-hospitals and will appear in print in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2014 guidebook, available on newsstands on August 27.

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