Posts Tagged ‘Traumatic Brain Injury’

Dr. Rauch, Clinical Director of Emory Healthcare Veteran’s Program, talks about Veterans reintegration and mental health.

Most servicemembers will have some type of adjustment period after returning home from deployment. For each person the process is different depending on different variables during and after deployment. Mental health issues, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma can make that even more difficult. The Emory Veterans Program is here to help them reclaim their lives.

Question:
How long does it usually take to adjust to normal life again? How long should I wait to see someone if I’m still not feeling like my normal self?

sheila-rauch-avatar

Dr. Rauch:
That is a good question. If at any time you’re having issues that you feel that you need or want help with, you should come see us. Readjustment often takes a year, and for some people longer, to feel like they’re really back in their life. The readjustment process is different for every individual and often depends on life’s variables, such as your job, social support and your family. It’s never too early to come talk with someone familiar with military service and deployment about your experience. Reintegration can be a difficult process. Mental health issues, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma can make that even harder. The Emory Veterans Program is here to help you reclaim your life.

Question:
My brother has seemed moody and depressed since he got back. Is there a good way for me to help him or encourage him to talk to someone about how he’s feeling?

sheila-rauch-avatarDr. Rauch:
It is common for returning veterans to have problems talking with people who have not deployed. While most veterans returning don’t have mental health issues, a significant minority may have problems with depression, posttraumatic stress or traumatic brain injury. Letting your brother know that you’re willing to listen or help is probably the best thing you can do. Sometimes it just takes patience to allow someone to open up.

 

Learn more about the Integrated Memory Care ClinicOr call for more information 1-888-514-5345

The Impact of Brain Injury on Veterans

Nearly 20% of deployed military personnel experience traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBIs are any brain injury caused by an outside force. These injuries can be “closed,” such as from a fall or motor vehicle accident or “open,” like from a gunshot wound.

Traumatic brain injuries range broadly from mild to severe. People with mild TBI (also called concussion) often fully recover within days to weeks, while those with severe TBI may have significant and sometimes permanent impairments. Fortunately, 70 – 90% of all TBIs in military personnel fall within the “mild” range.

Symptoms of Mild TBI

Traumatic brain injury can cause physical, cognitive and emotional difficulties.

Typical symptoms of mild TBI/concussion include:

  • Looking and feeling dazed
  • Being uncertain of what is happening; feeling confused
  • Having difficulty thinking clearly or responding correctly to simple questions
  • Being unable to describe events immediately before or after the injury occurred

Complications of Mild TBI

Although most with mild TBIs fully recover within a matter of days, a small percentage have symptoms that persist for months or even years. What causes this? Research shows outside factors may interfere with the brain’s recovery. What begins as a neurologic injury is complicated by other non-neurologic factors, such as chronic pain, side effects of medicines and psychological distress—all of which cause similar symptoms to TBI.

These outside factors are commonly experienced by veterans because in many cases their brain injuries were the result of a blast that also injured other parts of their bodies. In addition to their physical pain, injured veterans also commonly experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety disorders and depression.

Brain Injury Awareness Month: Not Alone

The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) leads the nation in observing March as Brain Injury Awareness Month. They work to build awareness of the condition and support individuals with brain injuries and their families.

Help for Veterans with TBI

Emory Healthcare Veterans Program offers expert and collaborative care to help heal the invisible wounds of war. Our comprehensive approach combines psychiatry, neurology, rehabilitative medicine and family support to help veterans reintegrate and reclaim their lives.

A coordinated treatment plan may include:

  • Cognitive rehabilitation
  • Education about typical recovery and common barriers
  • Management of orthopaedic injuries and chronic pain
  • Medication management
  • Psychotherapy
  • Complementary medicine (yoga, meditation, acupuncture, sleep medicine)

 

 

Learn more about the Integrated Memory Care Clinic

Call for more information, call 888-514-5345

Emory’s Veterans Program is Helping Heal the Invisible Wounds of War

military-familyEmory Healthcare launched Emory’s Veterans Program Sept. 1, a new program for veterans offering clinical care, research and education, focusing on comprehensive treatment for post-9/11 veterans suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), anxiety, depression and conditions stemming from Military Sexual Trauma (MST). Comprised of several initiatives committed to the health and wellbeing of veterans, including Wounded Warrior Project’s newly established Warrior Care Network, Emory is one of four academic medical centers that make up the national network offering quality mental health care for post-9/11 veterans, at no cost to qualified individuals.

“Our program focuses on helping heal the invisible wounds of war, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury,” says Barbara Rothbaum, PhD, director of Emory’s Veterans Program and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University School of Medicine.

According to research conducted by RAND Corporation, about 18.5% of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans suffer from PTSD or depression, and 19.5% report having experienced a traumatic brain injury during deployment.

Emory’s Veterans Program is collaborative by design and incorporates top specialists in psychiatry, psychology, neurology, rehabilitative medicine and wellness into a treatment team that assess each veteran’s needs in order to develop a comprehensive, individualized treatment plan.

“It is important to be able to meet a veteran where he is, and provide individualized treatment plans using a collaborative approach,” says Rothbaum. “We’re so committed to this that we have hired veterans to fill critical positions within the program to ensure we are appropriately meeting the needs of the service members we treat.”

Treating victims of military sexual trauma is another aspect of Emory’s Veterans Program. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 20,000 service members, both male and female, endured military sexual trauma in 2014 alone, ranging from sexually hostile work environments to rape. Treatment often involves prolonged exposure therapy that incorporates virtual reality technology as well as other types of therapy and medications.

Collaborating with the Center for Deployment Psychology and several other organizations, Emory’s Veterans Program strives to enhance providers’ ability to deliver quality care to veterans. The program provides free, specialized training to community behavioral health providers in understanding military culture and how it plays a part in the treatment of service members.

For more information about Emory’s Veterans Program, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/veterans. To reach the Care Coordinator, call 888-514-5345.