Recent Posts

Cosmetic Medicine
Brachioplasty: Is an Arm Lift Right for You?
Oct 31, 2014 By Felmont Eaves, III, MD, FACS

Arm LiftWith an ever-increasing focus on fitness, more and more patients are seeking surgery to achieve firm, toned, youthful appearing arms. In fact, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, brachioplasty – otherwise known as an arm lift – is currently the fastest growing aesthetic surgery procedure in North America, increasing by more than 775% from 1997 to 2013. When we think about treatment of the arms, however, it is important to know that it is not a "one size fits all" treatment, and that there are options. Before getting into these options it is important to understand that when we use the term "brachioplasty" we are generally talking about treating the upper arms, typically from the elbow to the area under the axilla, or arm pit. There are times that we might treat the forearm (the area between the elbow and the wrist), but that is far less common. We can also extend the brachioplasty onto the chest wall to treat laxity in that area if needed. There are two primary tools that surgeons have to contour the arms – this includes fat removal and surgical excision. Fat removal is done primarily by liposuction, with a tiny incision placed behind [...]

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Highlights
Emory Healthcare Ranks Nationally for Quality and Safety Excellence
Oct 30, 2014 By Emory Healthcare

UHC Quality Leadership Winner 2014University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), a national organization comprised of most of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, has ranked Emory University Hospital (which includes Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital) eighth in the nation in the 2014 UHC Quality Leadership Awards. This is the fourth consecutive year that Emory University Hospital has ranked in the top 10 for demonstrating superior performance in delivering high-quality care and safety excellence. Emory University Hospital Midtown, which is Emory Healthcare’s second academic and eligible hospital, ranked in the top quartile as 22nd nationally. The Quality Leadership Award honors top performers in UHC's Quality and Accountability Study, which ranks performance in the areas of: mortality, effectiveness, safety, equity, patient centeredness and efficiency. These rankings are the most rigorous in health care and look at how major teaching hospitals are doing in multiple dimensions of quality and safety. They are traditionally looked upon as providing the best, most non-biased national quality measurement system available for teaching hospitals. Since 2006, we have been on a journey to [...]

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Cancer
Lung Cancer Progress Made, But We’re Not There Yet
Oct 30, 2014 By Fadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director, Winship Cancer Institute

Lung Cancer (This blog was originally posted on September 29, 2014 on the American Association for Cancer Research website) Luther Terry, the ninth Surgeon General of the United States, released his now seminal Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States on Jan. 11, 1964. The report, assembled by a brave and committed panel of independent physicians and scientists, definitively concluded that lung cancer and chronic bronchitis are causally related to cigarette smoking. Fifty years later, genomic discovery and the rapidly accelerating fields of epigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics, and drug discovery have presented an armada of new options for patients with lung cancer. Computed tomography (CT) screening of high-risk individuals, particularly smokers, helps detect the disease in its early, more-curable stages more than 80 percent of the time. Breakthroughs in cancer immunology have led to the accelerated development of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors, demonstrating remarkable and durable benefits in early clinical trials of lung cancer patients with advanced disease. But in 2014, five-year survival remains under 20 percent for patients [...]

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Rehabilitation
Emory Honors World Stroke Day
Oct 29, 2014 By Joshua Dunn, RN, MSN, CCRN, Stroke Program Coordinator

World Stroke DayOn this Wednesday, October 29, people all across the globe will celebrate World Stroke Day. This day was established in 2006 to raise public awareness of the warning signs of stroke. Our teams at Emory Healthcare work daily in the fight to treat and end stroke. Last year, Emory Healthcare treated over 1800 stroke patients at our hospitals, and approximately 300 patients received intensive rehabilitation care post-stroke at the Emory Rehabilitation Hospital – a total surpassing 2,000 patients. We are passionate about stroke prevention – especially since 80% of strokes are preventable – and have created outreach teams that screen and educate members of the community throughout metro-Atlanta. To date in 2014, our teams have reached over 1,000 community members and counting. Recognizing stroke early and getting immediate medical attention is key in reversing potential damage to your brain. Remember to ACT F.A.S.T. if you suspect that you or someone else around you is experiencing a stroke. If you notice the following signs, you should call 911 immediately: F: Facial droop; uneven smile A: Arm numbness or weakness S: Slurred speech, difficulty speaking or [...]

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Heart & Vascular
Expanding Cardiovascular Team
Oct 28, 2014 By Emory Healthcare

Emory Healthcare is constantly growing, and in doing so continues to welcome some of the best faculty and staff members in the industry. Here’s a spotlight on two of the newest members of our cardiovascular team: Camden Hebson, MD Camden Hebson, MDDr. Hebson was born in Gadsden, Alabama and raised in Birmingham. He attended Vanderbilt University for undergraduate training and then returned to Alabama for medical school. Dr. Hebson joined Emory Healthcare eight years ago and has since completed a pediatric residency, chief residency, pediatric cardiology fellowship, and an advanced fellowship in adult congenital cardiology. Dr. Hebson now cares for both children and adults with congenital heart disease. He focuses on lifelong care and has particular interest in patients with single ventricle disease, aortopathies (including bicuspid aortic valves), and patients with congenital heart disease who become pregnant. He sees patients at both The Emory Clinic located on Clifton Road and Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital. Dr. Hebson enjoys spending time with his family - wife Carolyn, son Henry, and daughter Alice. His other interests outside of cardiology include fishing, leisure reading, and [...]

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Cancer
Takeaways from Dr. Cohen's “Advancements in Breast Imaging” Live Chat
Oct 27, 2014 By Emory Healthcare

Thank you to everyone who joined us for last week’s live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, discussed the latest in breast imaging screening and technology. Questions varied from ,“What are the current breast screening guidelines?” to “What is tomosynthesis and when is it the right choice for screening?” Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the chat. Make sure to view the chat transcript for the whole discussion. Question: What are the current breast cancer screening guidelines? Michael Cohen, MDAnswer: Women aged 40 and younger should have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years. All women aged 40 and over should get a yearly screening mammogram, clinical breast exam and perform a monthly breast self-examination.   Question: When is breast tomosynthesis the right choice for screening? And how does tomosynthesis compare to an MRI in diagnosing cancer? Michael Cohen, MDAnswer: Digital Tomosynthesis (3D mammography) is an improvement on traditional 2D mammography. Rather than the traditional single view of a breast in 2D [...]

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Cosmetic Medicine
Non-Surgical vs. Surgical Facial Rejuvenation: Which is Right for Me?
Oct 24, 2014 By Felmont Eaves, III, MD, FACS

Facial Rejuvenation OptionsOver the past several years there has been an explosion of options to help your face look better and younger. Fillers, toxins (e.g. Botox®), stem cells, facelifts, fat grafts, skin tightening, and the list goes on and on. With so many options, how can you know what is right for you? Is surgery better, or will non-surgical treatments help you achieve your goals? Do the treatments even work? As you consider your options, understanding a few general principals can help simplify the decision. First, it’s important to understand that surgery and non-surgical procedures sometimes do different things, but sometimes they do the same thing in different ways. For instance, deepening of the nasolabial folds (the creases from the side of the nose toward the corners of the mouth) can be softened by dermal fillers such as hyaluronic acid (e.g. Juviderm®, Restylane®). This type of injection is performed during an office visit and only takes a few minutes. Surgery, however, can also diminish the folds. Fat grafts can be utilized to soften the folds much like fillers, and often the most dramatic improvement to the folds is when a face lift is combined with fat grafting. Second, [...]

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Highlights
Stroke Risk & Prevention in Women
Oct 23, 2014 By Gina Lundberg, MD, FACC

Ladies Night OutCurrent estimates suggest that 6.8 million Americans are living after having had a stroke, approximately 3.8 million of whom are women. Stroke is also the third leading cause of death among women and the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. Although much of the difference in stroke prevalence and burden is because women, on average, live longer than men, some of it is related to factors unique to or more common in women. The American Heart Association (AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) recently assembled a panel of experts that published the first gender-specific AHA/ASA guidelines for stroke prevention in women. Stroke is a brain injury caused by a cessation of blood flow in the brain. This interruption can be caused by either a blocked blood vessel or a ruptured blood vessel. Because the brain is not receiving the oxygen and nutrients that it normally obtains from blood flow, the brain starts to die. “How our society adapts to the anticipated increase in stroke prevalence in women is vitally important. Now more than ever, it is critical to identify women at higher risk for stroke and initiate the appropriate prevention strategies,” [...]

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Highlights
4 Ways to Substitute Greek Yogurt to Make Healthier Snacks and Meals
Oct 22, 2014 By Emory Johns Creek Hospital

Greek YogurtGreek yogurt has skyrocketed in popularity during the past several years as consumers have started recognizing the health benefits of this once obscure dairy product. The difference between the Greek yogurt and regular yogurt is in the straining process. The Greek variety is strained more extensively, which removes more of the liquid whey, lactose and sugars. This also produces Greek yogurt’s thicker consistency. Both low- and non-fat versions of Greek and traditional plain yogurts can play a part in a healthy diet by improving bone health and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adults. Yogurt, Greek or otherwise, is a good source of calcium, potassium, Vitamin D and protein. Both regular and Greek yogurts also contain active cultures (probiotics), which promote better digestive health. One of Greek yogurt’s primary benefits is it delivers higher protein and less sugar than the regular variety. Six ounces of Greek yogurt can deliver as much protein as three ounces of lean meat. As a result, Greek yogurt promotes the sense of fullness with fewer calories than many other protein sources. On the downside, Greek yogurt can be higher in [...]

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Heart & Vascular
Benefits of Stress Reduction
Oct 20, 2014 By Alexis Cutchins, M.D.

Stress ReductionWhether it’s a tight work deadline, an overdue bill or busy parental duties, stress affects all of us. It’s important to understand how stress impacts your health before it starts to severely impact your wellbeing. Reducing stress can help slow your heart rate, lower your blood pressure, increase blood flow and lower fatigue. According to the American Heart Association, stress may affect a person’s risk for heart disease, which is the leading killer of Americans. Things you can do to reduce stress include meditation, eating healthy foods, breathing deeply and leaning on loved ones for support. For some people, simply slowing down may help, while for others, moving around and/or exercising may be the answer. To learn more about stress reduction, please join us for the annual Reward Your Heart event hosted by Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital. You can enjoy an evening of relaxation and heart-healthy information, featuring chair massages, yoga demonstrations and delicious tastings of wines, specialty olive oils and dark chocolates. The evening will include informal consultations with physicians, nutritionists and exercise specialists from Emory Healthcare. Learn [...]

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