kidney transplant

Friend Receives a Life Saving Surprise of a Kidney Transplant

Kidney Transplant Josiah and BritniMusic brought two friends together – Josiah Martin and Britni Ruff – and now they share an everlasting connection. Josiah was born with a genetic kidney disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which destroys the kidneys. Now at the point of end stage renal failure, Josiah was in need of a kidney transplant. In stepped Britni who would change Josiah’s life forever. Britni reached out to the Emory Transplant Center to donate her kidney, and learned she was a blood and tissue match. Emory reached out to Josiah to tell him he had a living donor, but Emory couldn’t tell him who his donor was, and neither could Britni.

“I didn’t think he would let me do it,” Britni said. “If I would have told him, he would have told me, ‘No, don’t do it. You’re too young’.”

Watch this heartfelt story of surprise unfold from FOX 5 Atlanta.

Emory Transplant Center has a well-established kidney transplant program. The Emory Kidney Transplant Program ranks no. 6 nationally for adult kidney transplant volume, performing more than 250 kidney transplants each year.

Emory Living Donor Kidney Program

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program has a well-established living donor kidney transplant program. To date, we have performed more than 1,400 living donor kidney transplants. We encourage living donation because of the excellent outcomes and the shorter wait times for patients to receive a kidney.

Emory Transplant Center also offers a paired exchange program to donor and recipient pairs who do not match. We work with the National Kidney Registry to locate matching kidneys and exchange with other recipients who have donors who do not match with them.

To learn more about kidney transplant and Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program, visit emoryhealthcare.org/kidneytransplant or call 855-366-7989.

End-Stage Renal Failure Treatment Options: Dialysis or Kidney Transplant

kidney transplantYour kidneys are small but mighty organs tasked with the job of filtering 200 quarts of blood and about two quarts of waste and water every day — all in an effort to keep your body running smoothly.

When your kidneys aren’t working as well as they should – because of a chronic disease or acute illness – waste can back up into your body. Chronic kidney disease, which affects nearly 30 million Americans, can also put you at higher risk for serious issues, including heart attack and stroke.

There are many stages and treatment options for individuals managing kidney disease – from antibiotics to treat infections, to minimally invasive options when the disease is in its early stages, to complex surgical procedures, such as kidney transplants, during end-stage renal failure. End-stage renal failure is the last stage of chronic kidney disease.

What is end-stage renal failure?

End-stage renal failure, or kidney failure, is the last stage of chronic kidney disease. It means that one or both of your kidneys no longer function on their own.

Kidney failure is generally a gradual process, one your doctor will be monitoring closely. You will be officially diagnosed with the disease when you lose about 85 – 90 percent of kidney function, and when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 15.

This can be a scary time for many patients and their families. Fortunately, today’s advances in medicine are delivering better treatments and outcomes for individuals with end-stage renal failure. The two most common treatment options are dialysis or kidney transplant.

What is dialysis?

Dialysis is a life-saving treatment process that helps the body remove waste and water from the blood. A machine does the work of your kidneys and prevents salt and water buildup, controls blood pressure, and maintains the minerals your body needs in the blood stream.

Dialysis is an on-going treatment. There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

Hemodialysis

During hemodialysis, blood is passed from the body through a set of tubes to a special filter called a dialyzer. Once the blood passes through the filter, the cleansed blood is returned to the body through another set of tubes.

Hemodialysis treatments are usually administered three times per week as an outpatient at a dialysis center. Each session can last from two to four hours.

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your stomach to filter blood. A sterile solution (dialysate) with minerals and glucose runs through a tube into the peritoneal cavity (the space between the abdominal walls).

This cleansing fluid stays in the peritoneal cavity for a few hours to absorb waste products and fluids from your body. Then, it is drained out by a tube and into a separate bag. This process is done several times throughout each day.

There are two types of peritoneal dialysis: continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Your doctor will help you to decide which approach is best. Both types of peritoneal dialysis are done at home.

Kidney transplant

A kidney transplant is another option for individuals with end-stage renal failure. This surgical procedure removes the kidneys that are no longer functioning and replaces them with one healthy kidney. (Our bodies only need one healthy kidney to effectively filter waste and water from the blood).

The main advantage of a kidney transplant is quality of life: Individuals who undergo a kidney transplant are usually able to return to a normal, active lifestyle. In fact, many find themselves enjoying things they never were able to before the transplant, such as travel, exercise and more time with family and friends.

A transplant improves your kidney health and your overall health and wellness. Many find they have more energy, a stronger appetite and are better able to manage chronic health conditions. They also no longer need dialysis.

Kidneys for transplantation come from two sources: living donors and deceased (non-living) donors. Living donation is possible because a person can live well with one healthy kidney.

What end-stage treatment option is best for me?

You, your doctor and your family should talk openly and honestly about which option is best to treat your end-stage renal failure. Your doctor can provide important information about the risks and benefits of each treatment, and how they may impact your health and condition. Your family, a social worker or a therapist can help you weigh the emotional, mental and physical toll of dialysis or transplant.

Every individual’s path to treating end-stage renal failure looks a little different. The best news is that, with today’s technology, research and on-going support, you have more options – and opportunities – to enjoy a healthy, fulfilling life.

About Emory Dialysis Center

Emory Dialysis operates three state-of-the-art dialysis clinics located across Atlanta. Patients have access to Emory’s world-renowned physicians and clinical staff, including nurses, technicians, dietitians and social workers. We offer a full range of dialysis modalities, including in-center hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and training services for home hemodialysis. To learn more, visit Emory Dialysis.

About Emory Kidney Transplant

Emory Transplant Center performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1966 and currently ranks as one of the most prestigious transplant programs in the country. Our team of specialists is highly skilled in the care of kidney transplant patients and will work with you every step of the way to ensure quality care and service. To date, Emory has performed more than 5,000 adult kidney transplants. To learn more, visit Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program.

 

Grandmother’s Kidney Donation Secures Kidney Voucher for Granddaughter, Starts Chain of Kidney Transplants

Jamie McNeil is a 56-year-old grandmother of two-year-old twins. As a nurse by trade, she was aware of the benefits of living-kidney donation for needy recipients. But when her twin granddaughters Adele and Aubrey were born two years ago, one was diagnosed with multicystic kidney disease. This was when McNeil began researching how she could play an active role in helping Adele.

Online research brought McNeil to the National Kidney Registry’s (NKR) donor voucher program website. The National Kidney Registry’s (NKR) Donor Voucher Program allows donors to donate their kidney many years before their intended recipient may need a kidney transplant. Voucher recipients receive a “virtual voucher” for a living donor kidney to redeem when and if they may need it, and are registered on the NKR’s inactive list, often for many years. This gave McNeil the chance to help her two-year-old granddaughter Adele, as well as a stranger who was waiting for a match on the paired kidney donor exchange wait list. The paired-donor exchange program is available for recipients who do not have a donor match but who have a donor willing to match with someone else so their loved one can receive a kidney.

“The day I donate my kidney is going to be one of the most significant days of my life,” said McNeil prior to her surgery in September. “It will be one of the best feelings in the world to be able to give the gift of a kidney donation to someone. We must be the change we wish to see in this world and I wish to see more love, so I am going to be that love.”

McNeil, along with the Emory Transplant Center, have together created a safety net for Adele, while also starting a chain of kidney transplants. McNeil is Emory’s first participant in the voucher donor program.

“Jamie is our first patient who has come forward to be a voucher donor,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, professor of surgery in the department of Surgery, division of Transplantation at Emory. “She immediately let us know that this was for her granddaughter, who does not need a kidney at this time but may need one in the future. Our hope is that she doesn’t need one in the future, but now her granddaughter will have that opportunity to get a living-donor kidney later in life if she needs one, as a result of Jamie’s goodwill.”

With more than 100,000 people waiting for a kidney on the deceased-donor waiting list, living kidney donor programs are making a big difference for patients in need.

McNeil’s surgery was a success, and her kidney donation began a chain of paired-donor kidney exchanges involving eight people, with four kidneys transplanted into grateful recipients.

Emory Living Donor Kidney Program

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program has a well-established living donor kidney transplant program. To date, we have performed more than 1,300 living donor kidney transplants. We encourage living donation because of the excellent outcomes and the shorter wait times for patients to receive a kidney.

Emory Transplant Center also offers a paired exchange program to donor and recipient pairs who do not match. We work with the National Kidney Registry to locate matching kidneys and exchange with other recipients who have donors who do not match with them.

To learn more about kidney transplant and Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program, visit emoryhealthcare.org/kidneytransplant or call 855-366-7989.

 

Teacher Donates Kidney to Student through Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program

Kaden Koebcke

Photo source: AJC.com

Twelve-year old Kaden Koebcke was diagnosed with kidney disease at the age of two. He underwent a kidney transplant when he was 5 years old but it was unsuccessful, and the kidney had to be removed within days of the transplant. Kaden continued life on dialysis, undergoing dialysis three times a week, but his condition began to deteriorate. Last year, Kaden’s family started a Facebook page in search of a living donor. Several people volunteered to be tested, including William Wilkerson, Kaden’s 6th grade technology teacher at Grace Christian Academy in Powder Springs. William was tested at Emory Transplant Center, and was found to be a perfect match. Both donor and transplant surgeries took place on August 14th – Kaden’s at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and William’s at Emory University Hospital. Both are reported to be doing well.

Read the full story on AJC.com.

Emory Transplant Center has a well-established kidney transplant program. Emory performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1966 and has performed more than 5,000 kidney transplants to date – making us a leading national program.

Emory Living Donor Kidney Program

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program has a well-established living donor kidney transplant program. To date, we have performed more than 1,300 living donor kidney transplants. We encourage living donation because of the excellent outcomes and the shorter wait times for patients to receive a kidney.

Emory Transplant Center also offers a paired exchange program to donor and recipient pairs who do not match. We work with the National Kidney Registry to locate matching kidneys and exchange with other recipients who have donors who do not match with them.

To learn more about kidney transplant and Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/kidneytransplant or call 855-366-7989.