Posts Tagged ‘emergency department’

Buzzing Bees Take the Sting Out of Shots at Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s Emergency Services Department

Less Painful Shots for KidsAs parents, we usually try to keep our kids and stinging insects more than an arm’s length apart, but the Emergency Services Department at Emory Johns Creek Hospital recently enlisted the help of a small bevy of bees to take the sting out of shots for its pediatric patients.

The “bees” are palm-sized vibrating devices, called Buzzies, designed to look like smiling bumble bees. When the Buzzy is placed against the patient’s body near the site of the nasty needle poke, the theory is it reduces the pain by confusing the nerves and distracting the patient’s focus away from the point of injection. For small children—and their parents—this can be a huge plus, especially during a visit to the local emergency room.

Natascha Barney, Directory of Emory Johns Creek’s Emergency Services Department, learned about the bee-like angels of mercy from one of the department’s staff nurses who discovered them on a visit to Children’s Hospital of Atlanta. “When she saw it, she got really excited about suggesting it for us,” Barney says. “Our staff is really thrilled to be able to offer a cute option like this to our patients.”

Using Buzzies also helps include family members in the care process, which is at the core of Emory Healthcare and Emory Johns Creek’s mission. “Parents can help us hold it in place while we give the shot,” Barney explains. “It gets them involved and helps decrease their anxiety levels.”

The device is the brain child of an Atlanta-area emergency health specialist and mom, who invented product after she sat through her own 4-year-old’s shot trauma. Several versions of product are manufactured locally in Alpharetta and Suwanee. In addition to pediatric uses, The Buzzy is marketed to diabetics and for use in a number of adult healthcare situations that involve needle sticks. Barney joked, “We’re probably going to need them for some of our big ‘kids.’”

The funds for the Buzzies were provided through donations from EJCH employees and the community through a program call MyEmory Healthcare. “We are thrilled to now have the ability to grant funds to hospital departments to help enhance the patient and family experience,” says Kathryn Albright, Emory Johns Creek’s Director of Development.” It’s heartwarming to see the wonderful things that can happen when people pull together for a great cause.”

Have you had an experience where a healthcare provider used a creative solution to make an uncomfortable situation easier? Share your story with us in the comments below.

Related Resources:

When Should You Go to the ER?

While some health conditions do not require emergency care, many do.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) wants the residents of our community to understand when it is best to seek care from the emergency department and when they can wait to see their primary care physicians.

“In many cases, patients are confused about what constitutes an emergency,” explains Arthur Griffiths, MD, FACEP, senior staff physician and community liaison in the Emergency Department at EJCH. “While many minor medical issues such as earaches and sore throats can generally be handled by a primary care physician’s office or walk-in clinic, a variety of conditions absolutely require emergency care.”

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) has identified 10 medical conditions that warrant a 911 call or a trip to the emergency room:

• Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
• Chest or upper-abdominal pain or pressure
• Fainting, sudden dizziness, weakness or lack of mobility
• Changes in vision
• Confusion or changes in mental status
• Any sudden or severe pain
• Uncontrolled bleeding
• Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea
• Coughing or vomiting blood
• Suicidal or homicidal thoughts or feelings

“If you are unsure of what to do in a certain situation, either call your primary care physician’s office or the Emergency Department for guidance,” says Dr. Griffiths. “I encourage patients to trust their instincts if they feel unsure. While we hope you never have a reason to visit the Emergency Department at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, we want you to know that our team of experts is here 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to deliver high-quality emergency care to our patients.”

For more information about the EJCH Emergency Department, or for a downloadable version of ACEP’s list of 10 medical conditions that warrant a trip to the emergency room, click here!

Related Resources

Emory Johns Creek Hospital Emergency Department

Summertime Emergency? Come to the Emory Johns Creek Emergency Department!

Emory Johns Creek HospitalSummer’s here, and along with barbecues, baseball, and pool parties come the inevitable bites, bumps, and scrapes. In most cases, summertime ailments don’t require much more than a bag of ice and a Band-Aid. But if you do need emergency help, the Emory Johns Creek Hospital Emergency Department is here for you—with some of the best doctors, highest patient satisfaction scores, and shortest wait times in the area.

Arthur Griffiths, M.D., F.A.C.E.P., Senior Emergency Physician and Emergency Department Physician Community Liaison at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, says the cases he sees this time of year run the gamut from sports injuries to spider bites to heatstroke. Not sure how to tell when an injury merits a visit to the ER? When in doubt, make the trip. Have a bad cut? A lot of people don’t realize you have six hours to sew a laceration. If you sleep on it, it’s too late. Bitten by an insect? If you find yourself having difficulty breathing or developing a fever, or the bite is getting bigger quickly or starting to open up, let us take a look. Inhaler not helping your asthma? We can help.

“It’s always safer to come in if there’s a concern,” says Dr. Griffiths. “Come in. Let us evaluate you.”

Emory Johns Creek also offers interventional cardiology and are a certified Primary Stroke Center. During the summer, says Dr. Griffiths, “our patients are overexerting themselves, doing things they haven’t done in a while.” With heart attacks and strokes, fast intervention is key. If you have chest pain, weakness in an extremity, or numbness, come in immediately for quick evaluation and treatment.

“We are your community emergency department,” says Dr. Griffiths. “We provide a quiet, compassionate, caring environment with the highest in quality of care.”

To learn more, visit Emory Johns Creek Hospital, online.

Related Resources: