Wellness Resources

Build your Own First Aid Kit with These 16 Items

first-aid250x250It’s a new year, and a good time to think about getting a fresh start on your family’s health.

Creating a first aid kit for your home – and even your car – helps keep first-aid items in one easy place. It’s also fairly easy to do and low cost.

You can either start your first-aid kit scratch, or purchase one from a local drug store and tailor it to your family’s needs.

Either way, be sure to include the following:

  • Contact list: Keep a list of emergency contacts, including those of close friends, neighbors and family members. Make sure you include contact information for your primary care physician and, if you have children, their pediatrician.
  • Copies of insurance and medical records
  • List of prescribed medications and known allergies: Having this information readily available helps paramedics and other medical professionals treat you more effectively. Even though there are a number of apps available to help you track meds, a printed list is easy for everyone to access.
  • Prescriptions: Make sure you stock any medications prescribed by your physician, such insulin, epinephrine injectors (EpiPens), heart medication, asthma inhalers, etc.
  • Adhesive bandages
  • Allergy and anti-itch medications
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Aspirin
  • Antacid
  • Burn ointment
  • Eye wash solution: In addition to rinsing irritants out of your eyes, eye wash can be used a s a general decontaminant
  • Laxative
  • Petroleum jelly or other lubricant
  • Scissors
  • Thermometer
  • Tweezers

Store your kit in a cool dry place and periodically check it for items that need to be restocked. Also be sure to check expiration dates on any medications. Make sure everyone in your family knows where the kit is located, and encourage everyone to put it back where they found it. That way your set for the next time you need it.

Takeaways from Dr. Bergquist’s Live Chat on Stress Management

stress-cil-638Thanks to everyone who attended our live chat, “Managing Your Stress,” Tuesday, Dec. 22, with Sharon Horesh Bergquist, MD, who serves as Emory Healthcare Network primary care physician and associate professor with the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Bergquist fielded some great questions on a range of topics, including:

  • Stress and its relationship to autoimmune disorders
  • Stress effects on aging
  • Anxiety attacks
  • Best stress-relieving activities
  • Managing grief during the holidays
  • Good stress and how to make stress work for you
  • The effects of stress on migraines
  • How your primary care physician can help you manage stress

If you didn’t get a chance to join us, read the full transcript from “Managing Your Stress” here.

Two questions didn’t get answered during the live chat, so we’re sharing them here, along with Dr. Bergquist’s responses:

Question: Are other SSRIs as effective as fluoxetine for treating SAD?

Answer: SAD can stand for social anxiety disorder as well as seasonal affective disorder, so I wasn’t sure which one is being asked here.

For social anxiety disorder, the SSRI paroxetine and the SNRI venlafaxine are effective. Older drugs from a family called MAO inhibitors, such as phenelzine can also be used.

Seasonal affective disorder, a seasonal pattern of recurrent depression in fall or winter months, can affect 1.5% to 9% of people. It is typically treated with antidepressants, light therapy or psychotherapy.

There are actually very few high quality studies looking at the best anti-depressant for seasonal affective disorder, and there is virtually no data comparing SSRIs for treating SAD. The data is limited to studies on fluoxetine compared to placebo (in which fluoxetine shows a non-significant benefit) and fluoxetine compared to light therapy (it is nearly equivalent). Other SSRIs are commonly used in practice for SAD but there is little data to know if they are effective.

A recent review on the topic found bupropion XL to be an effective alternative for preventing recurrences of SAD (but even here it was effective at best in a small percent of people, around 20%).

Question: Due to psychoneuroimmunology, if a person has cancer, does distress increase the risk of cancer recurrence?

Answer: A relationship between stress and cancer progression has long been suspected. Recently, through animal cancer models, we are learning that the molecular link between the two may be through the beta-adrenergic signaling pathway which mediates the sympathetic nervous system induced fight-or-flight response.

Stress, through the beta-adrenergic pathway, may contribute to the progression and metastasis of a cancer . (Immune mediated macrophages can infiltrate some tumors such as breast cancer and, like a switch, induce pro-metastatic genes to be expressed.)

The stress hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine can attach and turn on receptors on tumor cells to control a variety of function involved in progression, such as proliferation, migration and invasion. Yet, little research is available to answer the question about whether distress can increase cancer recurrence.

Dr. Bergquist is an Emory Clinic Primary Care Physician and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Her expertise includes healthy aging, heart disease prevention and management, women’s health, diabetes, nutrition and obesity counseling and treatment of mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. She has appeared in over a hundred health segments, including Good Morning America, Fox New Network, CNN and Fox 5, has served as an editorial consultant for WebMD and wrote the TED Ed Lesson, “How Stress Affects Your Body.”

Below we have also highlighted some questions that were asked during our live chat.

Question: It’s been said that a certain amount of stress is good. How does a person maintain a good level of stress without tipping over into chronic debilitating stress?”

Short-term stress is advantageous—not only can it help us perform our best but even supports resilience at a cellular level. Stress becomes debilitating or “toxic” when it is prolonged or recurrent, such as worrying about a sick child or finances. The interaction between stress hormones and the hormones and immune cells, among others, throughout our bodies are responsible for both the good and adverse effects.

Question: How does stress affect aging?

Stress has been associated with decreasing longevity and shortened telomeres. These are the shoelace tips at the ends of chromosomes that allow DNA to get copied every time a cell divides without damaging the cell’s genetic code. With each cell division , telomeres shorten until a cell eventually dies. Stress accelerates this process.

In one study done on mothers who were either caregivers of healthy children or children who were chronically ill, the women who felt the most perceived stress had telomeres that were shorter on average by the equivalent of a decade of aging compared to mothers that felt the least stressed.
How much does exercise really help with stress?

Exercise is one of the most effective ways to manage stress. Exercise can reduce cortisol, which is otherwise known as the “stress hormone”. Exercise can also improve other neuroendocrine changes that take place from chronic stress, and it can reduce the immune system mediated damaging inflammation that occurs from chronic stress.

Question: Mindfulness- what does this mean and what role does in play in stress management?

Mindfulness is actively focusing on the present, and observing your moment to moment thoughts and emotions without passing judgment on them. It’s the opposite of being mindless. Mindfulness has become a widely used way of reducing stress, helping with concentration and focus, increasing compassion and self-awareness, and controlling emotions.

Question: Can a certain diet affect your stress levels?

Omega 3 fatty acids are vital for proper nerve function. A diet that is high in omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids can exacerbate the chronic inflammation that can be triggered by chronic stress and can adversely affect brain function. . Refined carbohydrates, such as sugar, can cause a spike and then a drop in your blood sugar level. People can feel irritable when their blood sugar drops. B vitamins, zinc, and magnesium are necessary in sufficient amount to support our brain chemicals. There is also a lot of research linking gut bacterial balance and brain health. Fiber rich foods support a healthy gut while sugar, fat, and processed food can disrupt gut bacterial balance.

To view the entire chat transcript click here.

Managing Your Stress Live Chat on December 22nd

stress-chatThe holiday season is in full swing, and there’s no better time to think about stress management. In short spurts, stress is actually helpful and can propel us through a tough situation or help us react quickly to avoid one. However, prolonged or severe stress may trigger physical, psychological and emotional reactions that can lead to health problems or worsen existing ones.

On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 from noon to 1pm EST join Emory Healthcare Network’s Sharon Horesh Bergquist, MD for an interactive web chat on Stress Management. Sign up, send questions and learn about

  • Symptoms of stress
  • Long-term effects of stress on your health and body and
  • Techniques for reducing stress

sign-up2

About Dr. Bergquist

avatar-horesh-bergquist-sharonDr. Bergquist is an Emory Clinic Primary Care Physician and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Her expertise includes healthy aging, heart disease prevention and management, women’s health, diabetes, nutrition and obesity counseling and treatment of mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. She has appeared in over a hundred health segments, including Good Morning America, Fox New Network, CNN and Fox 5, has served as an editorial consultant for WebMD and wrote the TED Ed Lesson, “How Stress Affects Your Body.”

Infertility Statistics and Infertility in Men

couple-walking-autumnInfertility is a common problem that affects one out of every ten couples trying to conceive. Perhaps because of social stigma, infertility is rarely publicized or discussed, despite common occurrence. Recently, several celebrities have opened up on social media about their personal struggles in trying to conceive. Hopefully, these discussions will promote greater awareness of the both the causes of infertility, and the treatments for infertility.

Historically, any discussion about infertility has focused on infertility in women. People are often surprised to learn that 50% of all cases of infertility involve infertility in men. Causes of infertility in men range from abnormalities in sperm count, to hormone imbalances, and problems with ejaculation. In many cases, these male fertility issues can be treated either medically or surgically.

As a urologist who specializes in Men’s Reproductive Health, I can say that a diagnosis of infertility affects all aspects of a man’s life. Medically, a diagnosis of infertility can be worrisome because it may be an indicator of a potentially serious underlying medical condition. Psychologically, a diagnosis of infertility can lead profound feelings of guilt, anger, and low self-esteem.

Infertility statistics clearly show that infertility is a couple’s problem, and must be faced as a team. If you have concerns about your or your partner’s fertility potential, or need more information about fertility treatment options available at the Emory Reproductive Center, call 404-778-4898 to schedule or visit Emory’s Reproductive Center.

About Dr. Mehta

mehtaDr. Akanksha Mehta is an Assistant Professor of Urology at Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Mehta graduated magna cum laude from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, with double Bachelor degrees; Science (Biology) and International Relations. Dr. Mehta attended Alpert Medical School at Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, where she also did her General Surgery internship and Urology residency. She then completed a fellowship in Male Infertility and Microsurgery at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, NY, before joining Emory Urology in 2013, as the inaugural Health Services Scholar. Dr. Mehta is a Diplomate of the American Board of Urology (2015).

Dr. Mehta’s clinical interests lie in the area of male reproductive and sexual medicine, and microsurgery. She currently serves at the Director of Male Reproductive Health at Emory Urology, and is a Guest Researcher in the Division of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Mehta’s research interests lie in studying the impact of male factor infertility on clinical outcomes following the use of assisted reproductive technologies, as well as the recovery of sexual function among prostate cancer survivors. She is the recent recipient of a Urology Care Foundation Research Scholar award for her work.

Dr. Mehta currently serves as the Director of Undergraduate Medical Education, and is closely involved in teaching and mentoring medical students and urology residents. She has authored several book chapters and peer-reviewed publications in Urology, and has presented at both regional and national meetings.

Outside of Urology, Dr. Mehta maintains a keen interest in International Health; she has been involved in providing clinical care in Cambodia, Kenya, and Bangladesh.

RELATED RESOURCES:
Male Infertility Information

The New and Improved Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods

entrance-wesleyMental illness is an epidemic in the United States today. In the state of Georgia, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death (www.namiga.org). As more and more people are seeking treatment for depression, anxiety, and other mental health illnesses, there is a rising need for more treatment options. Sitting down with Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods Clinical Administrator, Jen Schuck, helped to shed light on how Emory Healthcare, is working towards addressing the needs of this rising epidemic.

In the past year, Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods (EUHWW) has undergone significant changes. Ms. Schuck says EUHWW as a whole, are trying to move away, “from the negative stigmas” by referring to psychiatric services as “behavioral health.” In addition to promoting a more positive way to talk about mental health, Ms. Schuck explains how EUHWW has essentially re-vamped the treatment method for behavioral health. Inpatient behavioral health has two units and offers two different outpatient treatment tracks. One unit is for “acute behavioral services such as paranoia, delusions, hallucinations or schizophrenia type illnesses” says Schuck. The second inpatient unit is for patients with medical co-occurring illnesses. The two tracks recognize the differences between patients and treating them to meet their specific needs. “We have to provide patients with life skills or coping skills for discharge readiness” says Schuck. She also reports the inpatient units are largely “stabilization” units. After receiving short term inpatient treatment, patients can step down to outpatient treatment—and again EUHWW offers two different tracks patients can choose from, based on their specific needs. Outpatient behavioral health services has different levels of acuity-

  • Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP)
  • Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP)
  • Continuing Care Program (CCP)

This breakdown makes it, “so we are always caring for the patient” throughout their course of treatment. Schuck says patients should be “treated for 6 to 8 months” post acute episode. The second outpatient program track offers patients a Transitional Care Clinic. Essentially, a nurse driven program for patients not going the PHP/IOP/CCP track. The nurse will contact the patient following their discharge from their inpatient stay. The Transitional Care Clinic follows patients for 30 days post-discharge and will make contact with the patient within 7 days of their inpatient hospitalization. This ensures patients are receiving the proper after care treatment. Schuck summarizes this new structure as, “patients who are inpatient can either go the PHP track post discharge or the Transitional Care Clinic track. Either way—it allows us to be more engaged in their after care.” Thus reducing recidivism because the patient will be supported long-term, rather than only acutely.

How do these changes impact the general community, you ask? Schuck says “number one, it provides easier access to behavioral health services. Gives ability to manage behavioral health services with comorbidities which is not commonly treated.” She also says being backed by a university, gives “access to cutting edge” treatment options for the community. She emphasizes the newly structured behavioral health systems at EUHWW serves patients who are “more fragile” and is special to the Atlanta area community because traditionally, medical and psychiatric co-occurring illnesses are not treated together.

When asked for her thoughts in general on psychiatric services for the 21st century at EUHWW, Schuck referred back to how the new treatment structures are more cohesive. She reports also EUHWW has a Neuromodulation clinic, which partners with Treatment Resistant Disorders (TRD) clinic to provide patients with ECT (electro-convulsive therapy—which is much less invasive now as it was in previous years), ketamine infusions, and Emory Healthcare has also just launched RTMS (Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Services). Schuck reports this will provide options to patients other than ECT—RTMS uses magnetic brain waves to change the brain chemistry in people with mental illness. Schuck reports the overall “global” goal is for the programs to continue to care for people beyond the walls of this hospital. She hopes to bridge our care continuum to outside providers and be able to treat the whole patient—rather than just one piece. When asked why families should choose Emory Healthcare for their behavioral health needs, Schuck references the above re-vamped treatment structure. She also reports such changes supports EUHWW moving towards, “being a world class treatment facility” providing individualized treatment. Schuck hopes in the next 5 years, that EUHWW psychiatric services will be expanded. She also says behavioral health needs will increase by 10% according to strategic planning and that “we need to be ready.” She re-emphasizes her goal of community outreach—having our continuum of care stretch beyond the four walls of our hospitals—reaching into the community. When asked what she would want the community to know about EUHWW, Schuck says “we have re-invented ourselves” explaining we are apart of a greater system within Emory Healthcare by creating a new identity, we are not a nursing home, and serve more than just geriatric patients; requiring many cultural changes. Schuck reports, “we are getting to a place that is more comprehensive” treating the acute system for long-term. Thus, it is tapping into a larger “brain health system”, providing care for more patients for longer time periods—a connection that other systems may not have. This is also a connection that could save a life. We are all in this together. Together, with the newly re-invented structures at EUHWW, we can help patients and families thrive in mental health wellness.

Emory Healthcare Behavioral Health Services:
Inpatient treatment- 404.728.6222
Outpatient treatment- 404.778.5526
PHP/IOP/CCP- 404.728.4776.

Partial Hospitalization Program – What is It?”

Partial Hospitalization ProgramI have been a part of the Emory family for 6 years. Over the past 6 years, I have worked in the Transitions Seniors Program, better known as PHP. When attending different community events, a question I hear all too often is, “PHP? What’s that?” PHP is short for Partial Hospitalization Program. I hope this blog can answer the question, “PHP? What’s that?”

What is Partial Hospitalization Program?

Partial hospitalization is defined by the American Association of Partial Hospitalizations as: A distinct and organized intensive psychiatric outpatient treatment that closely resembles short-term inpatient program. The Medicare psychiatric partial hospitalization benefits were established to provide patients with an acute mental illness, services in lieu of inpatient psychiatric care (Block & Lefkovitz, 2009). The PHP patient care is an individualized treatment plan developed by the physician and a multidisciplinary team with input from the patient.

Who is part of the multidisciplinary PHP team?

Our team includes a physician, a program director, four licensed therapists, a registered nurse, and an advanced practice nurse. All team members are very experienced in the mental health field and serve our patients with pride, compassion, and integrity.

Who should use PHP?

Patients admitted to a PHP program require a minimum of 20 hours per week of therapeutic services. Here at Emory Wesley Woods, we have a PHP program that is geared specifically towards older adults. We target patients who are 60+ struggling with a mood disorder (such as depression, anxiety, bipolar, etc.) and need a higher level of care than outpatient treatment. Patients do not need a doctor referral; however, they must meet certain diagnostic criteria.

About Our Program

Emory Healthcare’s Transitions Senior Program (PHP) of Wesley Woods was established in 1997. It is a hospital based program represented by the National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems and is part of a larger continuum of care for older adults. As of 2013, we were also recognized under the Joint Commission as a “Top Performer on Key Quality Measures.” According to the Joint Commission website, to be recognized, is a “symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to meeting certain performance standards.” We are honored to have this. Click here for more information on Joint Commission.

The Transitions Senior Program is designed to provide intensive therapy to older adults experiencing behavioral health difficulties. The structured format provides medical monitoring as well as therapeutic groups on a wide range of topics. The program can be used as a step down from inpatient treatment for older adults needing an intensive level of care, but not hospitalization. Additionally, the program can be a preventive measure for patients at risk of inpatient hospitalization. The advantage of this program is that patients are able to continue their normal life activities with very minimal disruption. After assessment of needs, each patient receives a personalized treatment plan. The therapy program is voluntary and is conducted daily from 10:00 am to 2:30 pm, Monday through Friday. The average length of stay is between 4 to 6 weeks. Our program is the only senior-specific partial program in the metro Atlanta Area as well as the only one to provide free transportation to and from the facility.

In addition to the PHP program, we have also launched an IOCP (Intensive Outpatient Counseling Program) in September 2014. This is a 3 day program (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) in a less intense setting than PHP, where patients can attend for up to 36 treatment days (roughly 3 months). This program takes the concepts learned in PHP and teaches patients how to apply and use them in their daily lives. A patient does not have to go to PHP in order to join. Patients do need to provide their own transportation for this program. IOCP is Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 11:30am to 2:15pm.

I am proud to say I work in the Transitions Senior Program. The psychiatry department is thriving as PHP and IOCP continue to grow daily. If you are ever at Wesley Woods, feel free to stop by to speak to anyone on our team. We are on the first floor of the hospital, adjacent to the cafeteria. Both PHP and IOCP are housed in the same suite (B-1200). For more information on either program, please call 404-728-4776 or our program director, Ed Lawrence, at 404-728-6975.

We look forward to accommodating your geriatric psychiatry needs soon.

Choosing a PCP: It’s a Big Decision

Primary Care PhysicianChoosing a primary care provider is a very important personal decision, and a number of factors should be considered to make sure you are selecting a healthcare professional with whom you can form a long-term relationship.

A primary care provider, or PCP for short, works with you to maintain your overall health by focusing on wellness and the optimum management of your chronic conditions to avoid future problems. And while your PCP is your health care hub, he or she can also help you with selection of and referral to a specialist should your condition warrant the additional expertise. While specialists focuse on their area of expertise, your PCP maintains a holistic perspective. In that way, your PCP will work with your specialist, or specialists, to guide you through your treatment course and provide high-level oversight of treatments, medications, therapies and recommendations to ensure your care is as coordinated as possible.

Here are a few tips to help you choose the right PCP for you:

  • Ask Around – Talk to friends, relatives, neighbors and co-workers about their providers. Also consider asking other healthcare professionals for their opinions. Many hospitals also offer referral services, and professional sites, like the state licensure boards, or certification boards (e.g. American Board of Medical Spectialties), confirm whether or not a doctor is Board certified or has any special qualifications you may require.
  • Consider The Details – Once you’ve got a list of potential providers, winnow it down by asking yourself some practical questions:
    • Do I prefer a male or female doctor?
    • Is the doctor in my age bracket? Will I be able to relate to him/her?
    • Where is the office located? Do I need a doctor close to home or the office?
    • What hours of the day is the office open and will those hours be convenient for me?
    • Is the office staff courteous and efficient?
    • Does the office use an electronic medical record and are they able to access your results electronically from the hospital, lab, or other providers.
    • If you are interested, does the PCP offer online and nontraditional options for communication and alternatives to face-to-face visits?
    • If I need to be admitted to the hospital, which hospital would I prefer? Does the doctor normally refer patients there?
    • Does this doctor accept my insurance? If not, am I willing to pay out of pocket ?
  • Board Certification – While there are several online lists and rankings of providers, very few have objective assessments of the provider’s clinical performance. However, while imperfect, Board Certification, does indicate that the provider has met some minimum requirements. It is important to recognize that many fine clinicians have not earned board certification for very appropriate reasons.
  • Board certified physicians have:
    • Earned their degrees from a qualified medical school
    • Completed three to seven years of accredited residency training
    • Are licensed by a state medical board
    • Have passed one or more exams administered by the ABMS
    • Career-long continuing education requirements they must meet to certification
  • In-person Interviews – Once you’ve decided which doctor looks best on paper, take the next step and interview him or her at his or her practice. Most doctors encourage this, although some may charge a small fee for their time.
  • During the visit, be aware of your total experience, including:
    • How easy – or difficult – was it to make the appointment.
    • Consider the way you are greeted by staff members when you arrive
    • Notice the length of time you spend waiting after you check in.
  • When interviewing the doctors
    • Feel free to ask tough questions.
    • Make sure you feel comfortable with his/her responses and that you are both on the same page when it comes to medications, treatments for chronic issues, and other factors important to you.
    • Consider the PCP’s bedside manner. If your personalities don’t align it will be hard to build trust.
  • Review Your Choice – Following the interview, carefully review the experience. If you weren’t happy with the outcome, continue your search. However, if all went well and the provider met your expectations, then it’s time to start building this very important relationship. You will rely on it for years to come.

About Dr. Gitomer

Richard Gitomer, MDRichard Gitomer, MD, is the President and Chief Quality Officer of the Emory Healthcare Network. Dr. Gitomer has been practicing internal medicine for more than 30 years at Emory.

Related Resources

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

seasonal affective disorderSeasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or Seasonal Depression is a type of depression that correlates to changes in seasons. Most people with SAD start to experience some symptoms in the fall that continue, and can sometimes worsen, in the winter months. In people who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder, symptoms of depression will usually dissipate in the spring and summer, though a small percentage of people do report SAD symptoms during the summer.

Causes of Seasonal Affective Disorder

There are many external factors that can contribute to Seasonal Affective Disorder. Winter can often bring dreary weather, such as colder temperatures and lots of precipitation. These factors, combined with shorter daylight hours, can make it difficult to find the energy to get through the season. Geographically, those who live farther from the equator, either north or south, are more likely to be affected by SAD, perhaps because they experience longer periods of darkness in the winter and/or longer days in the summer.

Additionally, if you have a family history of clinical depression or if you are also suffering clinical depression or bipolar disorder, you could be at higher risk for developing SAD or experiencing worsening symptoms during the winter months.

Symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder

  • Weight gain
  • Daytime fatigue
  • Carbohydrate craving
  • Lethargy/lack of energy
  • Oversleeping
  • Lack of interest in normal activities
  • Hopeless and/or suicidal feelings
  • Social withdrawal

Though some experience only a mild form of SAD, a small percentage experience symptoms severe enough to require hospitalization or dramatically affect their quality of life. Those suffering from SAD who work long hours or during the night may have their symptoms further exacerbated, as they see less daylight.

Treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder

SAD is a mental health condition that can be improved with treatment. Treatments include stress management and light therapy using a special lamp that imitates daylight. Of those who seek treatment for SAD, about 80 percent see a reduction in their symptoms. The important thing is that you not dismiss your feelings of sadness as just another case of the “winter blues.” Seek professional help from a psychiatrist or therapist, or by talking with your primary care doctor. There is no need to suffer from SAD symptoms in silence, take the professional steps you need to maintain your health and happiness!

References

Emory Johns Creek Hospital continues Community Health Classes

Wellness ClassesLooking for a way to kick start a healthier lifestyle in the new year? A new 5-week course starts Feb. 25 at Emory Johns Creek Hospital focusing on health and wellness. Classes are taught by community and hospital healthcare providers and provide general education on nutrition and health issues to help participants progress toward developing personalized health plans.

Classes meet every other Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in Physicians Plaza Suite 109, located at 6335 Hospital Parkway in Johns Creek. The cost for all five sessions is $75. Class topics are:

  • Feb. 25: Introduction and Initial Health Screening. Taught by Andrew Pugliese, MD, a Disease Prevention Physician at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, will set the foundation with information on how a healthy, active lifestyle can influence personal risk factors for disease. Licensed lab technicians help participants complete a personalized physical health assessment.
  • March 04: Health Eating Habits and Their Effect on Chronic Disease Management. Julie Parish, an Emory Johns Creek registered and licensed dietitian, will provide disease specific diet education relevant to participant’s personal risk factors and demonstrate how to use a food diary to track progress.
  • Feb. 11: Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives. Emory Johns Creek Food Services Director, Amy Davis, will talk about organic and sustainable cooking tips and how to stock your kitchen to achieve dietary success. The class will also participate in a cooking demo and prep their own healthy dinner for four to take home.
  • March 18: Preventative Benefits of Exercise. Kay Halbert, Outpatient Rehabilitation Services Supervisor at Emory Johns Creek, discusses setting goals and general requirements for physical activity. Class participants can register to win a Fitbit to help track fitness and nutrition goals along with a pair of shoes from fleet feet and a gym membership with LA fitness.
  • March 25: Wrap-up with General Well-being. Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s Sleep Lab Coordinator and Registered Respiratory Therapist Joyce Neidert and Licensed Pharmacist Roland Tam. Discuss stress management with the Director of Marketing for Massage Envy Barb Hornsby. Class members can experience a free chair massage, take home a one hour session, and enter to win a custom pillow.

For more information or to register online, visit emoryjohnscreek.com/events-classes or call 678-474-8200 to register.

Emory in Your Community – Free Osteoporosis Prevention Program

nurses screening patientsEmory Healthcare’s Community Health Partnership* is offering a complimentary Osteoporosis Prevention Program at the United Methodist Church in Tucker. This 6-week program will screen and educate participants on ways to reduce their risk of osteoporosis.

Sessions will be facilitated by Emory specialty nurses who will provide:

  • Osteoporosis screenings
  • Personal progress consultations
  • Individual evaluation and follow-up

Start Date

Tuesday, February 17
5:30 – 7:00 PM

Location

Tucker First United Methodist Church-Wesley Center
2397 Fourth Street
Tucker, GA 30084

Register today as space is limited to the first 20 participants.

To register or for more information, call 404-778-7777 or e-mail ayibatari.owi@emoryhealthcare.org.

*Emory Healthcare’s Community Health Partnership is a collaboration between Emory and the North Georgia Conference of The United Methodist Church (UMC). This partnership provides community wellness screenings and health education programs to the local communities of selected United Methodist churches within the metro-Atlanta area.