Posts Tagged ‘LASIK procedure’

5 More Myths about LASIK

Myths about LASIK SurgeryI recently posted about the Top 5 Myths About LASIK Surgery… there’s a lot to think about and learn when considering LASIK. Here’s another five myths debunked!

MYTH #6: I’ve been told I’m not a LASIK candidate, so there is no surgery for me.

While LASIK is the most commonly performed refractive surgery and the correct surgery for most patients, there are other excellent surgeries available for patients who are not ideal candidates for LASIK. The surgeons at Emory Eye provide the full spectrum of refractive surgical options, including PRK, phakic IOLs, and refractive lens exchange.

MYTH #7: LASIK is too expensive for me.

For most patients who wear glasses, and all patients wearing contact lenses, the cost of LASIK is significantly LESS expensive over a short period of time when compared with the cost of glasses, contacts, solutions, and trips to the doctor to get your prescription checked. Many people also find that LASIK and similar procedures qualify for their medical spending accounts through their work, which further reduces the final out of pocket cost. LASIK may be the best investment you can make!

MYTH #8: LASIK is too dangerous.

While complications can occur with any surgery, for good candidates the overall safety of LASIK compares favorably with glasses and many studies have found that LASIK is safer than contact lens wear.

MYTH #9: LASIK is the same no matter where I have surgery.

Determining who is and who is not a good candidate for LASIK or other related procedures is a detailed process that requires excellent diagnostic equipment and excellent surgeon experience. Not all lasers are the same either, with some offering outdated technology. The results are still often quite good with this older technology, but not as good as they can be with modern lasers.

MYTH #10: After LASIK, I will never need to wear glasses again.

LASIK is a great surgical procedure, but it cannot stop the aging process! Most patients who have good distance vision in both eyes, with LASIK, contacts, or glasses, will eventually need reading glasses as they age. For many patients, a blended vision treatment, with one eye working best at distance and the other working best at near, works well. Even in these situations, patients may find themselves in need of a light pair of glasses for some activities, but may be able to spend the majority of their day without glasses or contacts.

Still have more questions about LASIK surgery? Schedule a consultation today.

About Dr. Randleman

J. Bradley Randleman, MDJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

Related Resources

The Top 5 Myths About LASIK

lasik mythsThere’s a lot of misinformation out there regarding LASIK surgery. Here are the top five myths debunked!

Myth #1: LASIK won’t treat my astigmatism.

LASIK can effectively treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. In fact, LASIK can effectively treat more than 95% of all refractive errors.

Myth #2: The results from LASIK wear off over time.

The change induced by LASIK is permanent. While it is true that some people’s prescriptions may change over time, this is the exception rather than the rule. In long-term studies, the vast majority of patients had insignificant changes over time and remained free of glasses and contacts.

Myth #3: LASIK is painful.

LASIK is generally a pain free procedure. There are a few moments of pressure, and the process can seem intimidating to patients before their treatment begins, but before any surgery begins numbing drops are placed in the patient’s eyes to prevent discomfort. The entire surgery is over in a matter of minutes. After surgery, your eyes may burn, itch or feel like there is something in them for the evening, and eye drops and a mild pain reliever should provide relief.

Myth #4: Recovery from LASIK takes a long time.

Almost all people are able to drive and return to work within one to three days of surgery and resume normal exercise routines right away. Patients are instructed to avoid any water that could be contaminated (like hot tubs, lakes and pools) for two to three weeks.

Myth #5: It doesn’t matter which doctor performs LASIK surgery.

Experience counts. When considering a surgeon, first make sure he/she has the proper credentials, including state licensing, board certification and subspecialty training in refractive surgery.

Ask questions like “How many procedures have you done?” and “What is your complication rate?”. Also make sure he/she is comfortable and experienced with several types of eye surgery so all options are considered to provide the best outcome.

Still have questions about LASIK surgery? Schedule a consultation today and we’ll help you decipher fact from fiction.

About Dr. Randleman

J. Bradley Randleman, MDJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

Related Resources

Can You See LASIK in Your Future?

LASIK Surgery Web ChatLaser vision correction was first performed in the 1980s and since then, the demand for such procedures has resulted in rapid advancement of the technology. For many people who previously were not a good candidate for laser vision correction, LASIK is now an option. Because LASIK is changing so quickly, our vision team fields lots of questions from people interested in LASIK, but who are not sure if it’s the right option for them, or what the procedure involves.

To help get you up to speed on LASIK surgery, the changes that have been made in the laser vision correction world, and what you can expect if you do choose LASIK, board-certified Emory Vision LASIK surgeon, Dr. Randleman, is hosting a 1 hour free web chat on Wednesday, October 12, 2011.

If you have questions such as…

  • Is LASIK surgery safe?
  • Is LASIK right for everyone? Is it right for me?
  • How long does LASIK surgery take?
  • What happens during the LASIK procedure?
  • Is LASIK painful?

…whether or not you prove to be an ideal candidate for LASIK, you are an ideal candidate for Dr. Randleman’s chat. All that’s required to participate is that you fill out our form so we can send you a link to enter the chat. You can ask as many or as few questions as you’d like during the chat, and in fact, if you’d rather just observe and read on as Dr. Randleman fields questions on LASIK, you’re more than welcome to.

We hope to see you for Dr. Randleman’s LASIK online chat on Wednesday, October 12. If you can’t make it but want more information on LASIK, you can either check out our LASIK resources online, or you can call the Emory Vision offices at 404-778-2733.

Am I Too Old (or Young) for LASIK?

LASIK surgery and age

Emory’s LASIK surgeons review every patient on an individual, case-by-case basis, but there are some basic considerations to think about regarding your age and its role in LASIK surgery:

Children 18 and younger

The FDA has approved LASIK surgery for people over the age of 18. Young eyes don’t fully develop and are constantly adjusting and changing shape. Our surgeons, therefore, advise patients who are 18 and under to wait until their eyes have fully matured before considering LASIK surgery.

Middle-aged adults

LASIK is a safe and effective way to treat nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism at any adult age. As we get older, however, new vision problems can develop. The most common age-related vision problem – presbyopia – occurs when the eye becomes less flexible and makes it difficult to change focus between near and far objects. This is why most of us will need reading glasses at some point.

If you’re middle-aged, you may want to consider LASIK surgery with blended vision (where we treat one eye for distance viewing and the other for close up vision). See what blended vision surgery looks like live!

Seniors

LASIK surgery may not the best option for older patients who suffer from age-related conditions such as cataracts. Cataracts occur when the natural lens in the eye becomes cloudy, resulting in blurred vision. It is one of the leading causes of vision loss among older people. Our surgeons at Emory Vision are board-certified ophthalmologists who are also experts at performing cataract surgery – where the eye’s natural lens is replaced by an artificial lens. If you have cataracts, I encourage you to contact the Emory Eye Center at 404 778-2020 to schedule an appointment.

Still have questions about the right age for LASIK? I’m happy to try to guide you in the right direction!

Does LASIK Hurt?

Most patients who have had LASIK surgery tell me, “I can’t believe the procedure was so fast and painless!”

During our initial consultations, many patients express concern about pain during and after LASIK. The great news is that during surgery most patients do not feel anything other than slight pressure on the eye and perhaps some mild discomfort.

In preparation for your LASIK surgery, we’ll administer some anesthetic eye drops that numb your eyes. As a result, you will only feel some pressure while the laser reshapes your cornea. Some patients may experience a slight feeling of discomfort from the instrument we use to keep your eye open during the procedure – since our natural inclination is to blink. However, because the surgery only takes a few minutes, this discomfort is very brief.

During the recovery period, you may experience some mild stinging or dryness. This is part of the normal healing process and usually only lasts a few days. Artifical tear drops often help to quickly take care of these symptoms.

If you’re interested in seeing exactly what you’ll experience during the procedure, watch our video of live LASIK surgery (displayed below). You’ll hear firsthand from one of our Emory Vision patients. Still have questions about pain during LASIK surgery? I’m happy to answer them!