Posts Tagged ‘LASIK candidates’

What age is best for LASIK?

lasik-age250x250There are certain ages that are considered landmarks – the first time you drive or vote – but for LASIK there’s really no “set age”.  In short, 18 is the minimum age for LASIK because your eyes are still changing.  Even if you’re not having any noticeable vision problems, you should have your eyes examined regularly to provide insight into your best time for LASIK.

Don’t wait too long for LASIK

It’s better that you don’t wait too long for LASIK.  As you age, your eyes start changing more and you may not be best candidate at age 45 as you would have been at 35.  Of course of all of these suggestions are relative to your individual eye conditions.   Start your regular exams prior to LASIK surgery and track changes.  Your eyeglass prescription should be stable (less than +/-0.50 diopter change) for one year or more before proceeding with surgery.

Do the quick check list today:

If you answer YES to any the following then LASIK may be right for you.

  • Are you UNDER the age of 60?
  • Without your corrective lenses, is your distance vision blurred?
  • Have you ever been told you have astigmatism?
  • Are your eyes otherwise healthy?

 

Free LASIK consultations are available now.  See if you’re a good candidate and take advantage of your HSA or other flex spending options!  Call 404-778-2SEE to schedule with Emory.

Still have more questions about LASIK surgery? Schedule a consultation today.

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About Dr. Randleman

randleman-j-bradleyJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

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New Year With a New LASIK View Live Chat Takeaways

lasik2-chatThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, October 27th for the live LASIK chat at Emory Eye Center hosted by LASIK surgeon, Dr. John Kim.

Dr. Kim answered several of your questions about LASIK for the coming year. And there are a variety of refractive surgical options. Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: Can LASIK treat nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism?

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Dr. Kim: Good question! Yes, LASIK can treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. However, it’s typically more effective for nearsightedness than farsightedness.

 

Question: Is surgery done on both eyes the same day?

Dr. Kim: Thanks for your question! Yes, in most cases, both eyes are done on the same day. Occasionally patients will only require treatment on one eye. This would be determined during your initial consultation.

Question: What is the difference between LASIK and PRK?

Dr. Kim: The primary difference between LASIK and PRK is that in LASIK a special flap, or separation is made in the layers of the cornea usually by a special laser. The flap is lifted and the laser treatment to reshape the cornea is applied underneath the flap and the flap is replaced.

If you missed this chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Kim, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

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Spend your HSA and FSA savings!

5 More Myths about LASIK

Myths about LASIK SurgeryI recently posted about the Top 5 Myths About LASIK Surgery… there’s a lot to think about and learn when considering LASIK. Here’s another five myths debunked!

MYTH #6: I’ve been told I’m not a LASIK candidate, so there is no surgery for me.

While LASIK is the most commonly performed refractive surgery and the correct surgery for most patients, there are other excellent surgeries available for patients who are not ideal candidates for LASIK. The surgeons at Emory Eye provide the full spectrum of refractive surgical options, including PRK, phakic IOLs, and refractive lens exchange.

MYTH #7: LASIK is too expensive for me.

For most patients who wear glasses, and all patients wearing contact lenses, the cost of LASIK is significantly LESS expensive over a short period of time when compared with the cost of glasses, contacts, solutions, and trips to the doctor to get your prescription checked. Many people also find that LASIK and similar procedures qualify for their medical spending accounts through their work, which further reduces the final out of pocket cost. LASIK may be the best investment you can make!

MYTH #8: LASIK is too dangerous.

While complications can occur with any surgery, for good candidates the overall safety of LASIK compares favorably with glasses and many studies have found that LASIK is safer than contact lens wear.

MYTH #9: LASIK is the same no matter where I have surgery.

Determining who is and who is not a good candidate for LASIK or other related procedures is a detailed process that requires excellent diagnostic equipment and excellent surgeon experience. Not all lasers are the same either, with some offering outdated technology. The results are still often quite good with this older technology, but not as good as they can be with modern lasers.

MYTH #10: After LASIK, I will never need to wear glasses again.

LASIK is a great surgical procedure, but it cannot stop the aging process! Most patients who have good distance vision in both eyes, with LASIK, contacts, or glasses, will eventually need reading glasses as they age. For many patients, a blended vision treatment, with one eye working best at distance and the other working best at near, works well. Even in these situations, patients may find themselves in need of a light pair of glasses for some activities, but may be able to spend the majority of their day without glasses or contacts.

Still have more questions about LASIK surgery? Schedule a consultation today.

About Dr. Randleman

J. Bradley Randleman, MDJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

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The Top 5 Myths About LASIK

lasik mythsThere’s a lot of misinformation out there regarding LASIK surgery. Here are the top five myths debunked!

Myth #1: LASIK won’t treat my astigmatism.

LASIK can effectively treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. In fact, LASIK can effectively treat more than 95% of all refractive errors.

Myth #2: The results from LASIK wear off over time.

The change induced by LASIK is permanent. While it is true that some people’s prescriptions may change over time, this is the exception rather than the rule. In long-term studies, the vast majority of patients had insignificant changes over time and remained free of glasses and contacts.

Myth #3: LASIK is painful.

LASIK is generally a pain free procedure. There are a few moments of pressure, and the process can seem intimidating to patients before their treatment begins, but before any surgery begins numbing drops are placed in the patient’s eyes to prevent discomfort. The entire surgery is over in a matter of minutes. After surgery, your eyes may burn, itch or feel like there is something in them for the evening, and eye drops and a mild pain reliever should provide relief.

Myth #4: Recovery from LASIK takes a long time.

Almost all people are able to drive and return to work within one to three days of surgery and resume normal exercise routines right away. Patients are instructed to avoid any water that could be contaminated (like hot tubs, lakes and pools) for two to three weeks.

Myth #5: It doesn’t matter which doctor performs LASIK surgery.

Experience counts. When considering a surgeon, first make sure he/she has the proper credentials, including state licensing, board certification and subspecialty training in refractive surgery.

Ask questions like “How many procedures have you done?” and “What is your complication rate?”. Also make sure he/she is comfortable and experienced with several types of eye surgery so all options are considered to provide the best outcome.

Still have questions about LASIK surgery? Schedule a consultation today and we’ll help you decipher fact from fiction.

About Dr. Randleman

J. Bradley Randleman, MDJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

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Considering LASIK Before Summer?

Summer LASIKAre you ready for the summer sunglass season? If you wear contacts then you know they aren’t pool ready… and glasses that don’t transition to shades will probably leave you squinting.

I am often asked if LASIK is better if done in the winter vs. the summer – the answer is really more specific for your lifestyle and availability. The procedure is performed in a controlled environment so the time of year will not impact outcome.

You can still get in for evaluations before the summer season.

Do the quick check list:
If you answer YES to any the following then LASIK may be right for you.

  • Are you UNDER the age of 60?
  • Without your corrective lenses, is your distance vision blurred?
  • Have you ever been told you have astigmatism?
  • Are your eyes otherwise healthy?

You could be glasses and contacts free this year. We have a special offer for 10% off LASIK if you share your information with us.

Call 404-778-2SEE

About Dr. Randleman

J. Bradley Randleman, MDJ. Bradley Randleman, MD, is a widely respected cornea specialist whose areas of expertise include: cataract and refractive cataract surgery with premium IOL implantation, LASIK and other corneal and intraocular refractive surgical procedures, the management of keratoconus, corneal diseases, and corneal transplantation. His primary research interests include the diagnosis, prevention, and management of refractive surgical complications and corneal cross-linking.

Dr. Randleman joined the Emory Eye Center faculty in 2004 and served as assistant residency director for two years while also completing a fellowship at Emory University in cornea/external disease and refractive surgery. He serves as service director for the section of Cornea, External Disease and Refractive Surgery.

Related Resources

LASIK Myths Debunked
Fun in the Sun After LASIK
The Top Five Benefits of LASIK