Posts Tagged ‘eyeglasses’

A lens is a lens is a lens — Or is it?

Choosing lensesIt’s time to get new glasses, and you’ve got the frames all picked out—but what about the lenses? Remember, the purpose of the glasses frame is to hold the lenses. Put mediocre lenses in a nice frame, and you might look good, but you won’t see well.

At the Emory Optical Center, we’ll make sure you look great and see well. Our eyewear experts have extensive experience crafting custom lenses that address a variety of visual challenges, from simple near and far sightedness to presbyopia to advanced macular degeneration. In fact, ophthalmologists from all over the Atlanta area send patients to us, knowing their prescriptions will be done right.

If you wear progressive lenses, you’re probably aware that multifocal lenses have come a long way over the past decade. Long gone are the lines in the lens that identified bifocal wearers in the past. New progressive lenses feature a seamless design and can address multiple vision impairments.

One of most exciting technological advancements in lenses is the freeform manufacturing process, which uses precision software to cut multiple curves on both the front and the back of a lens according to the patient’s unique prescription. This results in a highly effective lens that dramatically increases the wearer’s peripheral field of view. The free-form process is different from the traditional lens process, in which the prescription is cut into one side of semi-finished lens blanks.

Who might benefit from a free-form lens? A good example is a patient with macular degeneration who needs a high-power, versatile progressive lens. In this case, we can create a mixed front-side, back-side bifocal that gives an extremely high power for intermediate vision as well as an extremely high bifocal for reading.

At the Emory Optical Center, we offer four tiers of progressive lenses, from a basic design to the latest free-form technology. Whether you see an Emory ophthalmologist or bring your prescription in from elsewhere, we’ll put you in the lens that best suits your visual needs and price point.

Have you recently purchased glasses, or are you about to? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

About Brad Baird:
Brad Baird is the administrative consultant within Ophthalmology. Brad and the rest of the talented Optical Center team have been helping patients get the perfect fit for a combined total of more than 125 years.

Choosing the Right Pair of Glasses—More Art than Science

Choosing the right glasses and framesHave you ever wondered how to choose the right style of eye glasses? One of the most rewarding things we do here at the Emory Optical Center is to help people find glasses that look great on them. But how do you pick from all the choices available?

When you’ve been in the business for a long time, as we have, you can look at a face and know what will work. Some very basic guidelines are…

  • Round faces shouldn’t wear round glasses
  • A pear-shaped face is going to need a little accent on the top of the frames
  • A narrow face is more suited for round glasses (think John Lennon)

That said, fitting a frame to a face is not an exact science. There are other nuances, including subtle feature differences and coloring. And while the frame is key, lens shape can make a difference, too. If you’d like to hide a less-than-perfect feature like under-eye hollows or uneven eyebrows, different lens shapes can help mask those.

When we first sit down with you at the Emory Optical Center, we’ll ask what type of frame you have in mind. What we’ve found is that people often want a look they’ve seen on a celebrity, and often, that isn’t going to work for them. I’ll show you how the style you’re thinking of looks on you—you may be one of those people who look great in anything. But I’ll also be honest in pointing out any downsides, and, if you’re open to suggestions, we’ll find something that truly complements your facial structure.

If you’re not sure what type of glasses you want and you’re open to trying something new, we can really have some fun. A good optician can help you think outside the box when picking your frames. We’ll help you take a risk and try on glasses that are a bright color, maybe a little funky, or simply unique.

Sometimes chain optical stores recommend their customers buy the most expensive frames and lenses. At the Emory Optical Center, our goal is to make you look good and feel good (and see well, of course). If your glasses aren’t the right fit or shape, they are useless to you. We’ll work together to find the perfect fit.

Come see us at one of our two Emory Optical Center locations, at The Emory Clinic, Building B, 1365B Clifton Road, N.E., or on the 9th floor of the Medical Office Towers, 550 Peachtree Street.

Had a great experience or tips that you’d like to share about finding the perfect frames? Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below. You’ll make our day.

About Brad Baird:

Brad Baird is the administrative consultant within Ophthalmology. Brad and the rest of the talented Optical Center team have been helping patients get the perfect fit for a combined total of more than 125 years.

Emory Optical Center Locations:

The Emory Clinic, Building B
1st floor, 1365B Clifton Road, NE Atlanta, Georgia 30322
Optical Center: 404-778-4226
Hours: 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Appointments for Eye Exams:
404-778-2020; 404-778-5000 (after office hours)

Medical Office Tower, Emory University Hospital Midtown
(formerly Crawford Long Hospital)
9th floor, 550 Peachtree Street, NE
Optical Center: 404-686-8714
Hours: 9 AM - 5 PM
Appointments for Eye Exams:
404-778-2020; 404-778-5000 (after office hours)