Posts Tagged ‘Emory Vision’

LASIK Myths Debunked

Think you can’t have LASIK surgery? Think again!

If you’ve been told in the past that you couldn’t have LASIK surgery, it’s time to come to Emory Vision. During the last five years, LASIK technology has made a huge leap forward—and you may find that you’re now the perfect candidate. I’d like to take a moment to address two reasons you may have been told you can’t have LASIK.

#1- If you wear gas permeable contacts, LASIK is not for you (UNTRUE!)
Gas permeable lenses change the shape of your cornea to correct your vision. In fact, many eye doctors prescribe them to correct astigmatism. What you may not know, is that LASIK can actually be a way to treat the condition of astigmatism permanently.

What does this mean for you? It may be time for LASIK surgery! To find out, just take a three-week break from your gas permeable lenses, to allow your eyes to go back to their original shape, and then come in for your initial exam.

#2 – If you wear bifocals, you can’t have LASIK (UNTRUE!).
Do you wear bifocals—or are you nearing a time when you will? Have you longed for LASIK surgery but been told you’d still need to wear reading glasses? Now bifocal wearers can enjoy the benefits of LASIK surgery with blended vision—and put aside those reading glasses.

Blended vision means that, rather than treating both eyes for distance, we treat one eye for distance viewing and one for close up. Your eyes then make the necessary adjustment depending on your activity. Still not convinced? Come in for an initial exam at Emory Vision, and we’ll let you try out how blended vision works and feels before you have surgery using a special pair of glasses that simulates the effect.

LASIK and Your Career

Throughout the years, I have heard countless stories from patients who say that having LASIK surgery enhanced their career.

Some jobs simply require good vision, like being a pilot, athlete, photographer, surgeon, and many more. For patients who work in these fields – or who want to – LASIK surgery can be a necessity. Improved vision may mean the difference between getting the job you want or not. It can also have a marked impact on your performance.

I always enjoy seeing the smile on a patient’s face who no longer has to constantly wear eyeglasses or contact lenses. As you know, eyeglasses can fog up, get dirty, or fall off, causing safety hazards. Contact lenses can fall out, shift in the eye, or make some tasks extremely dangerous. If you have one of the jobs I mentioned above, LASIK surgery can mean the problems or risks of always wearing eyeglasses and contact lenses are a thing of the past.

Even if your job isn’t hindered by eyeglasses or contacts, you may find that your job satisfaction and performance increase as a result of having LASIK surgery. Improved vision benefits almost every career, allowing you to focus on the job at hand rather than worrying about your sight.

Finally, be sure to check with your employer to see if having LASIK could in any way jeopardize your career. There are a few jobs requiring very precise vision that may preclude your having certain refractive procedures, so it’s always best to check before considering LASIK surgery.

If having LASIK has benefited your career, please share your story with us!

The Top Five Benefits of LASIK

Our patients choose LASIK surgery for many reasons. While each patient is unique, we hear the same benefits mentioned time and again. Besides improved vision, I’d like to share with you the top five benefits we hear mentioned most frequently:

Immediate Results – As soon as your surgery is complete, you’ll notice an immediate improvement in vision, and it will continue to improve while you heal. Read about one of our patient’s excitement over saying “Goodbye to Glasses”!

Quick Procedure – The procedure is fast, typically 15 minutes or so. In fact, most people are surprised at how brief the surgery actually lasts. Want proof? Watch a live LASIK procedure here.

Cost Savings – LASIK is a great solution to many vision problems, which means no more need to update your glasses every few years or replace contact lenses every month. The cost savings keep adding up year after year.

Improved Self-Confidence – After LASIK, I continually hear patients say, “It’s like seeing the world in a whole new light!” Seeing clearly can help you become more comfortable in social situations and more outgoing.

Freedom – After surgery, there is no need for many of you to worry about losing or breaking your glasses, or to pay for prescription sunglasses. There is no need to put in your contacts every day and clean them every night. And you can swim, golf, drive or whatever else you like to do without having to think about your vision!

To find out more information about the benefits of LASIK surgery, or to schedule a free initial exam, call Emory Vision today at 404- 778-2733.

Do you have any questions about the benefits of LASIK? Or, would you like to add some additional benefits of your own? If so, be sure to let me know in the comments.

Fun in the Sun After LASIK

From scuba diving to water skiing or swimming at the pool, LASIK surgery can make a world of difference in how you enjoy water sports during the hot summer months. Imagine how much better the experience will be with clear vision!

Just remember you’ll have to ease into the fun immediately after having LASIK. Swimming can be dangerous to your healing eyes in the weeks following the surgery. Keep in mind that the corneal flap needs time to heal. Though you will feel fine and your vision will be improved, be sure to take extra precautions for at least the first two weeks after LASIK.

Oceans, rivers and lakes contain countless microscopic organisms that could easily slip under your unhealed corneal flap and cause infection or other complications.  Swimming pools contain their own microorganisms, along with chlorine and other harsh chemicals, and present a level of danger.

If you have a vacation scheduled and plan to be at the beach within a few weeks after surgery, be sure to wear goggles or a mask that completely prevents water from having any contact with your eyes. In some cases, we may recommend avoiding water for a further amount of time, depending on your particular situation. So be sure to check with one of the experts at Emory Vision before heading into the water!

Still not sure whether LASIK is for you? Be sure to see our Novel Approach to LASIK and view live LASIK surgery to hear one patient’s testimony about how it completely changed his life for the better. To find out more information about Emory Vision or to schedule an initial exam, leave us a note in the comments section, or contact us at 404-778-2733 today.

A LASIK Surgery Update from Daren Wang

My wife and I share our anniversary date with my parents. It’s a happy coincidence, and one of the consequences is that each year, we all head out for a celebratory dinner at our favorite restaurant in Atlanta.

The chef puts together a five-hour meal for us that involves many, many courses with paired wine tastings. It’s an extravagant, incomparable way to spend an evening. And one of the pleasures of it is to have a great chef expose us to new exotic foods, unusual preparations, and wonderful wines. We always make a guessing game of which herbs or spices are flavoring a dish. And each year, we get a rundown of what’s included in the meal.

The dining room is lovely, but darkish. And with the fine, elegant print, the menu turned out to be a challenge for everyone to read this weekend, even with glasses. Well, everyone except me, that is. I worked as something of a translator the whole evening, reading the descriptions to our little party, because my eyesight was perfect. I could look out at the gorgeous landscape as the Chattahoochee rolled by, or I could read 6 point type on the menu fine print explaining what was in a particular reduction.

Since I had my surgery, people often ask me about my experience. In response, all I can do is rave about the results. The dinner example is just one of dozens of discoveries and examples I could share about the improvements LASIK has made in my life. Non-prescription sunglasses, not having to hunt for misplaced glasses, compliments on the color of my eyes, and enjoying workouts sans glasses are just a few of the new pleasures I enjoy on a daily basis now.

And in an effort to thank Emory for the fine work they did for me, I make a point to refer everyone that I can to Emory Vision. A friend of mine who was fascinated by my LASIK process recently spoke of my live LASIK surgery adventure to her friend in London, who is now plans on having the surgery at Emory during her upcoming trip to the US.

If any of you would like to share your story about LASIK, or if you have questions for me about my experience, please feel free to do so here in the comments section.

Introducing Dr. Kim

In this post I’d like to introduce you to a very gifted physician on the Emory Vision team.

John Kim, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at Emory University. His areas of expertise include refractive surgery, the management of corneal and external eye diseases, and cataract surgery.

After graduating from Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Kim received his medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and served as chief resident while completing his ophthalmology residency training at the Eye and Ear Institute of the University of Pittsburgh. Following four years in private practice, he completed a fellowship in cornea, external disease and refractive surgery at the Cincinnati Eye Institute.

Dr. Kim is board-certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology and is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, and the Cornea Society.

He’s performed laser refractive surgery since 2000, and he recently wrote a chapter in a widely respected book on LASIK.  Today he serves on the Refractive Surgery Management and Intervention Self–Assessment committee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Dr. Kim lives in Atlanta with his wife, Gloria and their three lively young boys: Andrew (7), Joshua (3) and Luke (2).  His favorite hobby is playing sports with his sons, and he’s an avid golfer. In fact, he delights in hearing his patients share details of their improved ability to see the ball (and the entire golf course) after LASIK surgery.

As you can see, we have good reason to be incredibly proud of our talented team of physicians at Emory Vision.

Three Emory Employees; Three Patient Stories

Paula (left), Eddie (middle) and Robin (right)

I’d like to introduce you to three Emory employees from the Faculty Staff Assistance Program at Emory Healthcare who experienced LASIK here at Emory Vision.

It began with Eddie Gammill, who had his surgery here with us a few years ago and was so thrilled with his results that he proceeded to tell all of his coworkers about his experience.  Eye health is of particular importance to Eddie, not only because he’s the Manager of Wellness Programs for Emory’s Faculty Assistance Program, but also because of his family history—his grandmother was blind.

Eddie felt that LASIK surgery was an incredible opportunity. When interviewed for this blog post, he made a point to say, “I wish I hadn’t waited so long. LASIK surgery is truly one of the greatest things I’ve ever done for myself.”

It didn’t take long for Eddie’s enthusiasm to move Robin Huskey (his co-worker and the Manager of Outreach and Education at FSAP) to consider LASIK as well. Robin wore glasses that always interfered with her passion for water skiing, snow skiing and tennis. She said, “Eddie had such a great experience and spoke so highly of the staff and physicians.”

According to Robin, “The procedure went smoothly, and my vision is great!” In fact, Eddie and Robin’s positive reviews inspired yet another FSAP employee to explore the possibility of LASIK surgery—Paula Gomes, the Director of Wellness Programs.

“Eddie and Robin talked about how LASIK surgery changed their lives,” Paula said. “They were on a campaign to encourage me to think about it.”

Paula had her surgery earlier this year and is delighted to be free of her glasses: “Now, when I wake up in the morning, I’ll look across the room and just gaze at the alarm clock, enjoying my new vision.”

Naturally I’m fond of these stories because I’m an Emory Vision patient advocate. That said—I also think that they demonstrate the extraordinary power of positive word of mouth, something that happens naturally when you give patients only the best of care.

Epilogue

I’ve spent a lot of time looking at the horizon over the past couple days. Right now, with everything turning green around Atlanta, the leaves on the trees are especially lovely to see. But the reason I keep staring at them is that the detail of each tree in the distance is so much greater than anything I remember seeing before. My vision seems far better now than it was before even when I was wearing glasses.

When I’m driving, I keep feeling as if I should be reaching for my glasses, simply out of habit. I don’t have them anymore—I dropped them in the recycling bin. I KNOW that I shouldn’t drive without them, so I reflexively look for them. It’s an odd sensation, but one I’m happy to get used to.

In the days leading up to the surgery, I spent a lot of time thinking about having great vision, but it was only “day of” when I thought seriously about the procedure itself and started to really get nervous. But my wife Eva was with me, and that helped a lot. At one point, I was sitting in the waiting room and woman asked me if I was the guy in the videos on the Emory Vision blog. She said she’d been watching to see how the surgery turned out. We talked about being a little nervous, but I think she was as excited to have the process done as I was.

The folks at Emory were great. They clearly understood that I’d be nervous getting ready, and they carefully explained each step of the procedure, and the follow up as well. Knowing exactly what to expect really calmed me down.

The procedure itself was shockingly fast, painless, and really psychedelic, with lights flashing green and red. I wish I had brought my iPod along, because it was like the best Pink Floyd laser light show ever. I would have played The Great Gig in the Sky for the actual procedure.

The evening of the procedure I sat in the dark and listened to music and a couple podcasts. Emory Vison didn’t put these kind of restrictions on me, but I just thought I’d play it safe. First thing next morning, I got checked out, and got the all clear. Since then, I’ve been applying the eyedrops they prescribed four times a day, but that’s just for a week. My eyes feel normal to me now, except for being able to see for miles and miles.

Day After LASIK

Goodbye to Glasses