Posts Tagged ‘transplant’

Organ Donation Awareness – 4 Your Life 5K

Emory 5K for organ donation awareness

L–R: Dr. Wedd, Rachel P., Jennifer G.

Emory Transplant Center contributed to organ donation awareness on Sunday, April 23rd by participating in Donate Life of Georgia’s 4th annual Run, 4 Your Life 5K at Piedmont Park. The morning started off cloudy with the threat of rain, but that didn’t prevent Emory’s team of physicians, researchers, and nurses from participating in this important event.

The rain held off as the over 250 registrants crossed the finish line to raise awareness of organ donation and celebrate those who have given the precious gift of life to another. The Emory Transplant team consisted of 15 employees who helped support the cause. They represented clinicians and staff from our liver transplant, kidney transplant, and lung transplant programs, as well as our team of clinical researchers.

Comradery, Awareness, and Passion

Rachel Patzer, Ph.D., MPH, a clinical researcher in Emory’s Division of Transplantation and the Emory Transplant Center, served as captain of the Emory Transplant team. She wanted to pull together a team to build comradery among the Transplant Center staff, as well as raise money for organ donation awareness efforts, something that the Emory Transplant Center firmly stands behind.

Rachel’s work in transplantation is her passion. She has had family members that have been touched by transplant and understands the power of organ donation and how it can save a life.

“I think people who are willing to donate their organs to help save a life are truly amazing individuals – I think it is so inspirational,” says Patzer.

Rachel won 1st place female and placed 4th overall – icing on the cake – second to spreading the message of organ donation awareness.

All monies raised through this annual event are used to assist Donate Life Georgia in its mission to educate Georgians on the need for organ, eye, and tissue donation, and to motivate the public to become organ donors.

And when asked if Rachel is a registered organ donor herself, her answer, “Of course!”

Donate Life of Georgia is one of 50 local non-profit coalitions affiliated with Donate Life America, Inc. and works to spread unified organ donation awareness messaging to Americans about the importance of organ, tissue and eye donation.

Learn more about Emory’s Transplant Center, offering Georgia’s most comprehensive organ transplant program.

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Stranger Gives Holiday Gift to Georgia Teen

This time of year, during the holiday season, most people are shopping for family and loved ones trying to find that perfect gift. Well, a 16-year old Georgia teen received that perfect gift from a complete stranger – she received the gift of life.

Kelly Bundick, a 42-year old medical sales rep and single mother of a 5-year old son and a 12-year old daughter, decided to donate one of her kidneys to the Georgia teen. Kelly saw a photo of the teenager on the Callaway Facebook page. You may remember Raleigh Callaway, a kidney transplant recipient who received a lot of media attention when his wife posted a message on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” They were able to find a donor, and Raleigh had his kidney transplant surgery at Emory. To give back, the Callaway family continues the Callaway Facebook page to spread the word for others who are in need of a kidney and searching for a living donor.

This was the first time a child had been featured on the Callaway Facebook page, and Kelly knew she had to help the teen.

Watch the video below to see how the story unfolds…this truly is the holiday of giving.

Dr. Nicole Turgeon, who performed Kelly’s operation, is Director of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program. The Emory Transplant Center has a well-established program, performing more than 1,200 living donor transplants to date.

“I really cherish the opportunity to work with these donors because they put themselves in harm’s way,” Dr. Turgeon says. “So, I feel a tremendous amount of responsibility to them as well as to the potential recipient.”

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Liver Transplant Recipient Celebrates Silver Liverversary

patient story 8-11On July 2, Terri Willis celebrated her 25th anniversary with her transplanted liver. Over the years, Willis, who lives in Douglasville, has become one of the Emory Transplant Center’s most vocal advocates on the benefits of organ donation and liver transplantation, talking to other transplant candidates and recipients, participating in many transplant events and writing about her experiences on Facebook and blog posts.

“If someone had not said yes to organ donation, I would not be here,” she says.

Willis had her liver transplant at age 13 at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, but she has been an Emory Transplant Center patient since 1999. Her liver failed 25 years ago as the result of a metabolic disorder called tyrosinemia, a genetic defect that causes the immune system to break down the amino acid tyrosine, the building block of most proteins. When tyrosine and other byproducts build up in the tissues and organs, it can lead to nosebleeds, dietary issues, problems with the central nervous system, liver and kidney failure, and hepatocarcinoma. Willis developed tumors throughout her liver, and her transplant saved her life, keeping the cancer from spreading to other organs.

Willis has been running for years to stay in shape, and has participated in five U.S. Transplant Games mostly in track and field events. She is an inspiration to other recipients — to everyone who has ever heard her story.

Willis remains optimistic, even though she is currently experiencing a few issues with her liver and kidneys due to her medications and the age of her organ graft. The road hasn’t always been easy. She had two quickly resolved episodes of rejection in the mid-1990s and one eight-month long episode this year that has been more of a setback. But she keeps her positive attitude and shows other transplant recipients what a little grit can do by continuing to walk and run. “I want other patients to see that they can be active post-transplant,” she says. She ran Douglasville’s Hydrangea Festival 5K road race on June 5 in a specially made t-shirt in celebration of her upcoming liverversary. She gave her finisher’s medal to her longtime transplant hepatologist, Dr. Samir Parekh, who is pictured above with Willis.

Emory Liver Transplant Patient Celebrates One-Year Liver-versary

UntitledAll of our patients are pretty special, but there is something extraordinary about a liver transplant recipient who comes all the way from Gaffney, S.C. to host a party to thank the medical team who cared for her while she was at Emory Transplant Center.

Evonne Leland received a lifesaving liver transplant on April 22, 2015. She came back on the same date one year later — this time in good health — to celebrate what we at the Emory Transplant Center like to call a one-year “liver-versary.” A former restaurant owner, Leland, with help from her family and friends, organized a lunch to thank Emory Transplant Center staff and physicians. It was a true celebration of life.

“Before I came to Emory,” Leland says, “I was told there was nothing I could do; I had only six to nine months to live.”

Throughout the mid-1990s, Leland had one medical issue after another, resulting in many visits to doctors. In 2001, Leland learned she had an abnormal finding on her liver, and by 2009, her liver began to fail. In 2014, Leland was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and placed on the liver transplant waitlist in Charlotte, NC. Due to her health status at that time, she had to be taken off the list. She subsequently sought a second opinion at another hospital in North Carolina, but she was told her cancer was out of the criteria for a transplant there.

Leland then made a call to Emory Transplant Center and was able to make an appointment right away with the Emory Liver Tumor Clinic. “Mrs. Leland came here on April 2, 2015 and because we have a multidisciplinary clinic, we were able to arrange for the right specialists to evaluate her and obtain the necessary imaging studies to evaluate her liver cancer,” says Dr. Anjana Pillai, a transplant hepatologist and director of the Liver Tumor Clinic. “She was able to see the specialists she needed and we were able to make the decision to admit her that same day and expedite her liver transplant evaluation.” The Emory Liver Tumor Clinic was opened three years ago and has coordinated a multidisciplinary team of transplant hepatologists and surgeons, medical oncologists, palliative oncologists, interventional radiologists, and advanced practice providers to care for HCC patients.

Leland received her transplant only three weeks after her first visit to Emory. It has been a difficult road over the past year, but she is an example of how the Emory Liver Tumor Clinic’s multidisciplinary team works with each patient with HCC, or tumors originating in the liver, to determine a care plan that is best for him or her. Leland has made a remarkable recovery.

“I am so grateful for my transplant,” Leland says. “When so many doors were closed, Emory opened one for me.” Dr. Joe Magliocca, surgical director of the liver transplant program, was her surgeon.

The Emory Liver Tumor Clinic treats patients with HCC, which often is the result of cirrhosis, or liver scarring, from chronic liver disease and decompensation. Patients with early-stage HCC and cirrhosis treated with liver transplantation have a five-year survival rate of 75%, compared to only 25% to 30% without a transplant. HCC is a growing problem in the U.S.

According to Leland, “It was so nice to see the staff again now that I am so much better. I get up in the morning, and I can hold up my hands and they work. I can get out of bed and my legs work. And I don’t have to be on dialysis any more. I am so happy at what I can do. Each milestone is so very important. I’m getting there!”

Emory Transplant Center Receives Special Visit from Former NFL Player and Kidney Transplant Recipient

transplantThe Emory Transplant Center received a special visit from former NFL player Donald Jones, who received his own kidney transplant in 2013 following kidney disease. On Wednesday, March 16th, Jones visited with faculty and staff at Emory Transplant Canter and then went on to meet with kidney transplant patients at Emory University Hospital. It was quite a delight for our patients.

Jones was a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills from 2010 to 2012. While playing with the Bills, he began developing high blood pressure and experienced some vision loss. Then the New England Patriots signed him in 2013. But only a few months later, he was diagnosed with IgA nephropathy, a kidney disorder that occurs when IgA, a protein that helps the body fight infections, settles in the kidneys. Treatment for the disorder is dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Jones retired from the NFL in August 2013 at just 25 years old. In December 2013, Jones received a life-saving kidney transplant from his father. Since then, he has been traveling the country raising awareness and fundraising for kidney disease and IgA nephropathy.

Emory Transplant Center faculty and staff had the opportunity to attend a book signing of Jones’ recently published autobiography, The Next Quarter: Scoring Against Kidney Disease. And Emory kidney transplant recipients Robert Burns and Angela Parks, both from Decatur, were delighted to have Jones drop by their Emory University Hospital rooms.

While at Emory, Jones was also interviewed for an educational video about dialysis and kidney transplantation. Rachel Patzer, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of surgery in Emory University School of Medicine and Rollins School of Public Health, recently received funding to develop a video following her research study about kidney transplant rates, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in August 2015.

The study found only about one in four patients with end-stage renal disease in Georgia was referred by a dialysis facility to a transplant center for evaluation within one year of starting dialysis. Patzer hopes the video will educate dialysis patients about transplant as a treatment option and encourage patients to discuss transplant with their providers and family members.

The video, once released, will be distributed to dialysis centers throughout the U.S. that have low rates of transplant or racial disparities in access to transplant.

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about kidney transplant and the Emory Kidney Transplant Program

Understanding Organ Donation: Deciding to Give the Gift of Life

organ donation monthApril serves as National Donate Life month – raising awareness around organ donation and celebrating those who have given the precious gift of life to another. Currently more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting a life saving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Understandably, potential donors may have reservations about organ donation. The Emory Transplant Center has compiled a list of pros and cons to help you with your decision to become an organ donor. Of note, the cons referenced below may in fact not be cons at all, but rather based on misconceptions.

Pros:

  • ONE organ donor can save up to EIGHT lives. With more than 115,000 men, women and children awaiting organ transplant in the U.S., by registering to become an organ donor you can help save lives.
  • For the transplant recipient, it is a second chance at life. For some, an organ transplant means no longer having to be dependent on costly routine treatments to survive. It allows many recipients to return to a normal lifestyle.
  • For the family of the deceased donor, they feel a sense of goodness that came from a tragedy – that if the organs are transplanted into a young, deserving person, then their loss was not in vain. Donor families take some consolation in knowing that some part of their loved one continues in life.
  • Living Donation – It is possible to donate organs while you are still alive. One can donate a kidney, portions of the liver, lung, pancreas and intestines, as well as bone marrow, and go on to live healthy lives. Most often it is a relative or a close friend who donates, but there are others who choose to donate to a complete stranger.

Cons (Misconceptions):

  • Families might be confused by the fact that donor bodies are often kept on life support while the tissues are removed. Surgeons do not remove any tissues unless the person is brain dead, but they sometimes put the body on a ventilator to keep the heart pumping fresh blood into the tissues to keep them alive long enough to harvest. This is not the same as life, but there is a moment when the ventilator is removed and the heart stops.
  • Many individuals incorrectly believe that if they donate organs that they or their family will then need to fund the cost of the operation used to remove the organ. This is not the case as costs actually fall to the recipient.
  • Another “con” might be that the donor does not usually get to choose who the organs go to, and perhaps an organ will go to someone of a different faith, political viewpoint or temperament than the donor. The donor has to believe that all life is sacred and that anyone who receives the “ultimate gift” of a donor organ will be grateful and be imbued with a sense of gratitude and a desire to pay it forward.

To learn more about organ donation, join Dr. Nicole Turgeon of the Emory Transplant Center for a live chat on Tuesday, April 28th from Noon – 1PM. She will answer all of your questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. She will also discuss paired donor exchange – what it is, how it works and how paired donor exchange is helping patients get a second chance at life. Register for the chat here.
To become a donor and for more information visit Donate Life of Georgia.

Emory University Hospital Midtown Honors Organ Donors

Emory Hospital Donate LifeEarlier this month, team members from Emory University Hospital Midtown gathered on the steps of the hospital to recognize and celebrate organ donors.

Currently, there are more than 120,000 men, women and children in the United States who are waiting on an organ transplant. Though transplantation saves thousands of lives each year, there are always many more people in need of a transplant than there are organ donors. With that in mind, a team of nurses, chaplains and staff have boosted efforts to raise awareness of organ donation.

“Organ donation is a difficult thing to talk to families about, especially when they’re facing the sadness of losing a loved one,” explained Sheila Taylor, RN, an intensive care nurse and the nurse champion for organ donation awareness at Emory University Hospital Midtown. “It is so important to share with people just how many lives organ donation can save.”

The Gift of Organ Donation – April is Donate Life Month

donate-lifeFor many, April signifies the start of spring with the first signs of sunnier days, bluer skies and growing flowers. But for transplant patients, their families and donors, April symbolizes another kind of rebirth – the journey of organ transplantation and the generous gifts of organ donors.

Started in 2003 and celebrated every April, National Donate Life Month aims to highlight the growing need for organ and tissue donations and provide a positive reminder for people to sign up to become donors. As we celebrate Donate Life Month, we’d like to take a look back at some of our amazing stories of donation and transplantation. None of these stories would have been possible without organ donation:

If you’re interested in registering to become a donor, it’s simple. Just visit http://donatelife.net/register-now/.

Related Resources:

Emory Transplant Center

Donate Life: Georgia Capitol Event Honoring Organ Donors and their Families

Donate Life Light up the WorldEmory Transplant Center patient Amy Tippins was given a second chance at life. This New Year’s Day, she’ll honor the family that saved her life in the 125th Tournament of Roses Parade. Amy, the recipient of a life-saving liver transplant, will honor that gift by riding the Donate Life Rose Parade Float.

This year’s float, with the 2014 theme of “Light Up the World,” honors donors, recipients and their families who have been involved with organ, eye or tissue donation, and hopes to serve as a platform for inspiring others to heal and save the lives of those in need.

Amy is so thankful to her donor and her donor’s family, and has made it her life-mission to be a passionate advocate for organ donation. On December 17 at 11:00 a.m., Amy and other advocates for the cause will meet at the Georgia state capitol to put the finishing touches on decorations that will become part of “Light Up the World.” Amy, along with her donor’s family, will complete a floragraph of her donor’s image composed entirely of flowers and other organic materials. The floragraph will then travel to Pasadena to be placed on the float.

Amy will be joined at the capitol by Emory Transplant Center surgeon and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program, Dr. Nicole Turgeon, along with additional members of the Emory Healthcare team, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Grady Health System, Columbus Regional Health, Donate Life Georgia, LifeLink Foundation, the Georgia Eye Bank and many others involved in the organ transplantation process in Georgia.

The event is open to the public. Please visit Donate Life Georgia’s Light up the World Facebook page for details.

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Emory Transplant Center’s Donor Wall Debuts 21 More Names

Transplant Donor WallThe Emory Transplan Center’s living donor wall, spanning one entire wall in the Outpatient Transplant Clinic’s (OTC) reception area, includes 21 additional names as of Nov. 26. As we celebrate the holidays, paving the way to a season of giving, it is with joy that we highlight the names of those who have given a part of themselves to a related or unrelated individual — donations of selfless gifts so that others may live and enjoy improved health and wellness.

The wall made its debut in Emory’s OTC in 2007. The new panel is the third installation since the wall’s premiere, with additions also made in 2009 and 2011. Today, the wall displays over 400 living donor names and their relationship to the recipients of their life giving/life enhancing gift, a kidney or portion of one’s liver.

Our living donor wall pays tribute to the individuals named there as tangible depictions of the ultimate gift of love to another.

“You can make a living by what you get, but you can make a life by what you give.” —unknown