Posts Tagged ‘paired donor exchange’

Emory Transplant Center Ranked Second Largest Kidney Paired Donor Program

Emory Transplant CenterEmory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). ended 2016 with a bang. Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). Our last transplant for 2016 set a new record for us at 55 kidney paired donor transplants in a single month.

We ended 2016 with 399 transplants facilitated, an increase of 11% over 2015. We expect to cross the 2,000 program-to-date milestone by the end of this month.

Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and has been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012. Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.

According to Sharon Mathews, Lead Coordinator of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program, “Living donation can provide end-stage renal disease [ESRD] patients with a better chance of finding a compatible match and improve their outcomes and quality of life than a deceased donor match. Living donation, especially when facilitated by the NKR, a national paired donor exchange program, can speed the process to find compatible donors for patients and reduce wait times.”

We want to thank everyone for your hard work and support in 2016 – another great year for our Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program.

In the News: Emory Transplant Center Kidney Living Donor Program

organ-donor260x200Emory Transplant Center has recently made headlines with their Kidney Living Donor Program. Stories featured on FOX NEWS Health and in Atlanta magazine highlight individuals who have given the gift of life through organ donation. One story features Beth Gavin, a medical reporter for FOX5, who altruistically donated her kidney to a stranger that kicked off a string of six transplants. The other highlights an Atlanta police officer who donated a kidney to a stranger to allow his wife to be able to receive a kidney from someone else through paired donor exchange.

A kidney paired donor exchange occurs when a person in need of a kidney transplant has an eligible living donor, but the living donor is unable to give to their intended recipient because they are incompatible. Therefore, an exchange with another donor/recipient pair is made. This kidney paired donation enables two incompatible recipients to receive healthy, more compatible kidneys.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.”

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia.

FOX NEWS Health Story 

Atlanta Magazine Story

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Fox 5 Atlanta Health Reporter Gives the Gift of Life

fox5 atlantaFox 5 Atlanta’s health reporter, Beth Galvin, started a chain of her own this past June when she donated her kidney at Emory Transplant Center for kidney transplant. In her two decades as a TV reporter, she saw many patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis, and she wanted to help. She also was inspired by a story she covered in 2013 on Fox 5 about Chamblee Assistant Police Chief Mike Beller, a father of five who donated his kidney at Emory University Hospital (EUH). Galvin took a few weeks off from work and donated her own kidney at EUH last summer. Dr. Nicole Turgeon, Surgical Director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program, was her surgeon.

Galvin told her story at the October 24th Atlanta Trends in Transplant conference, hosted by Georgia Transplant Foundation. “I never expected the donor journey to be so emotional and spiritual,” she wrote on her Facebook page before her speaking engagement. “I began the process because I felt my inner compass was pointing me in this direction. Then, I stuck with it because I kept seeing signs I was on the right path.”

Galvin’s donated kidney was flown to the University of California at Los Angeles, where it transformed the life of a 41-year-old man on the waitlist there. He is a married father of two children and a volunteer baseball and softball coach. This was his second kidney transplant, which has saved him from the rigors of 4 a.m. dialysis before going to work. Galvin was one of six donors in a chain facilitated by the National Kidney Registry that ended up with six recipients who received new kidneys across the country.

Read Galvin’s first-person account in the fall issue of Emory Medicine magazine. To watch her story on Fox 5, click here.

Learn more about the Emory Transplant Center’s living donor program.

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Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s Organ Donation and Paired Donor Exchange Live Chat

organ donation monthThank you to everyone who joined us during National Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon answered questions about organ donation, including paired donor exchange – what it is, how it works and how paired donor exchange is helping patients get a second chance at life.

Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one on the importance of organ donation and how it can have a huge impact on people’s lives.

We were thrilled with the number of people who registered and were able to participate in the chat. The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer so we have answered them below for your reference.

If you missed this informative chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers located on our chat transcript. You may also visit the Emory Transplant Center website for more information. And for more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net.

Question: My grandmother is on dialysis and she is 73. Can she be placed on the waitlist for transplant? 

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Before anyone can be placed on the wait list for organ transplantation, he/she will need to be evaluated by a transplant physician to determine if he/she meets medical criteria for transplant, e.g. is the patient healthy and strong enough for transplant. There are also criteria around patient support care as well as financial requirements. We are happy to evaluate your grandmother. To schedule an appointment for evaluation, call 1-855-EMORYTX (366-7989). It is a toll free number.

Question: Will kidney donation affect pregnancy?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Women who donate a kidney can become pregnant after donation and deliver healthy babies. But we do recommend waiting 1 year after donation to become pregnant in order to heal from surgery and for your kidney function to be stable.

 

 

Question: What is the kidney donor waiting list exchange?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: If a paired exchange cannot be found, living donors in certain areas of the country may be eligible for living kidney donor list exchange. In this type of exchange, a kidney donor who is not compatible with their intended recipient offers to donate to a stranger on the waiting list. In return, the intended recipient advances on the waiting list for a deceased donor kidney. This type of living donation is also referred to living donor/deceased exchange.

 

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Turgeon, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript.

If you have any questions for the doctor, do not hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

 

Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s “Kidney Swaps and Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us during Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center transplant surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon discussed the different kinds of living organ donation, the process for living donation and even shared an inspiring video of one of her patients who had benefitted from Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program. Chat participants also had questions about islet cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes, which Dr. Turgeon answered with some great information on the 10th anniversary of two of our patient’s islet cell transplants and being diabetes free! Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one of the importance of organ donation and how it can make such a huge difference in people’s lives. For more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net. Check out more of Dr. Turgeon’s answers by reading the chat transcript!

Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the Emory Transplant Center’s live chat:

Question: How many kidney transplants do you perform at Emory every year?

100,000 People are Waiting for a Kidney. Learn More About Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program

Paired Donor Exchange ProgramDid you know that there are nearly 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list? With the average wait time for a kidney now at four years, patients are often eager to seek other options to waiting on a deceased donor kidney so that they can get back to living a healthy life. Fortunately, with today’s medical advances, a living or a deceased person can donate a kidney.

The Emory Transplant Center launched its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010 and has been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012. Join Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program on April 8 for an online live chat to learn how paired donor exchange works, what it takes to become a donor and how paired donor exchange is helping patients dramatically improve their quality of life.

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Mother Daughter Team Kicks Off Six-Way Kidney Swap

kidney-swapWhen Mother’s Day rolls around this year, Cindy Skrine and her daughter, also named Cindy, will have a lot to celebrate. Having lived with kidney disease for many years, the elder Cindy needed a kidney transplant. Her daughter was tested as a donor, but ultimately was not a match for her mother. She was, however, a match for someone in California. With the help of Emory’s Kidney Paired Donor Exchange program, thus began a six-way kidney swap that stretched from Georgia to California to Tennessee and then back to Georgia.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia.

To learn more about the Skrine’s story, check out the video below:

Visit the Emory Kidney Transplant Program website for more information on the Emory Paired Donor Exchange program.

Emory Transplant Center Takes Part in Second Largest Kidney Swap in History: 28 people Now Have a New Lease On Life

Kidney swap patients Troy Milford & Robert PooleAs a former pastor, Troy Milford had spent years counseling his congregation through the joys and challenges of their lives. But, as it turns out, he was quietly dealing with a challenge of his own.

In 1997, he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease. Though he felt well on dialysis, he knew he’d eventually need a kidney transplant. In 2010, he was placed on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. Several of Troy’s family members were tested in hopes of donating their kidney to him, but they were not matches. Troy’s friend and parishioner, Robert Poole was then tested, but he wasn’t a match either. That’s when Robert (pictured right with recipient Troy Milford) learned about the Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program at Emory University Hospital.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs. This was the case with Mr. Poole and Mr. Milford, and the basis of how Chain 221 worked.”

Map of Kidney Transplant SwapTroy and Robert are now part of the world’s second largest kidney swap in history, and the largest kidney swap to be concluded in less than 40 days. Named “Chain 221” by the National Kidney Registry, the chain involved 56 participants, which facilitated 28 transplants in 19 transplant centers across the country, including the Emory Transplant Center. A Good Samaritan donor, also known as an altruistic donor, initiated Chain 221 in Memphis on April 30, 2013, and the chain ended just five weeks later, on June 5, in Cleveland, Ohio.

Both Troy and Robert underwent surgery on April 30 at Emory University Hospital. That day Troy received his new kidney, while Robert donated his kidney to another person half way across the country, also in need of the new organ. Both men are doing well after their surgeries.

“Words can’t say how it made me feel that Robert, who’s not even related to me, would do this for me,” says kidney recipient Troy. “I am one of 28 people who has a new kidney, and a new outlook on life, thanks to this swap. That’s what God can do. He can work miracles.”

“Troy is a good friend and special person,” says Robert, who manages a golf course in Canton. “He was too proud to ask for help, even when he was sick, so I am really happy I could assist. It didn’t matter to me if I gave to someone I knew or to someone across the country. I was just thrilled to donate on behalf of Troy.”

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. “Ultimately we want to bring awareness to living and deceased donation with this story,” Turgeon explains.

Since the Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program began at Emory, the hospital’s surgeons have performed 27 kidney transplants. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia. In 1966, Emory performed the first Georgia kidney transplant. To date, the Emory Transplant Center has performed more than 4,300 kidney transplants, with 247 kidney transplants performed in 2012.

Visit the Emory Kidney Transplant Program website for more information on the Emory Paired Donor Exchange program.

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