Posts Tagged ‘lung transplant’

Double-Lung Transplant Gives Man New Outlook on Life

Double Lung Transplant Joseph McCanne and FamilyJoseph McCanne was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at just three years old. That diagnosis began a long journey that would ultimately include two double-lung transplants at Emory Transplant Center – with each transplant giving him a new opportunity to enjoy life at its fullest.

Declining Health, Steps Toward Transplant

At first, Joseph was hesitant to consider a double-lung transplant, despite his declining health. His cystic fibrosis was creating several serious health issues, including constant bouts of pneumonia that were sending him regularly to the hospital and lung function that eventually dropped to 13 percent.

It wasn’t until 2009 when he began to envision a brighter, healthier future – and that was all thanks to one person in particular: Kayse, the woman who would become his wife.

“I wanted to stick around a little longer,” he admits.

After years of indecision, he called the Emory Transplant Center and told them he was ready. Joseph was placed high on the transplant list and waited only two weeks. On October 7, 2009, he arrived at Emory for a bilateral transplant.

After a 12-hour surgery, a three-week hospital stay, and one-month recovery at home, he was playing racquetball.

“It was life-changing,” he says. “Climbing Stone Mountain, playing racquetball and tennis, going for a job in the neighborhood – most people take those things for granted, but they were amazing for me. It was a beautiful, wonderful gift.”

A Third Chance at Life

Joseph enjoyed seven years of good health – until June 2016 when he began to feel short of breath during regular activities. He returned to Emory, where he was diagnosed with a fungal infection. The infection was causing the transplanted lungs to suddenly go into rejection.

On March 13, 2017, he underwent a second double-lung transplant, once again performed at Emory Transplant Center.

“Emory has always been there, and they’ve been great,” says Joseph. “The doctors and nurses feel like family. They’ve been very supportive and instrumental to my health since I was 11.”

Now, Joseph is back to the life he enjoys: One that includes hiking, running, working and playing with his children.

“I’m doing things I’ve never thought possible – because of Emory, because of the transplant, and because of the care they provide,” he finishes.

The Power of Organ Donation

Spring is a great time to recognize those who have saved lives through organ donation, with observances and local events, such as National Donate Life Month in April, which encourages Americans to register as organ, eye and tissue donors, and the 2019 Atlanta Kidney Walk in May.

“I know firsthand how lifesaving organ donation can be,” says Joseph. “Having new life after transplantation allows you to do things you could never do. It’s an amazing feeling. It’s a brand new start.”

You can also register to become an organ donor by visiting Donate Life Georgia.

About Emory Transplant Center

Emory Transplant Center has performed nearly 500 lung transplant surgeries through the Emory Lung Transplant Program. Emory is a leader in clinical excellence and in pioneering new transplant therapies. We offer cutting-edge technology and superior outcomes in kidney transplant, liver transplant, lung transplant and pancreas transplant.

Our patients come from all over the nation for our high level of expertise and proven patient outcomes. We are proud to be ranked among the top 12 transplant programs in the nation and have performed more than 9,400 transplants to date.

To learn more about the Emory Transplant Center, visit emoryhealthcare.org/transplant or call 855-366-7989.

Real Patients, Real Stories – Hear from an Emory Lung Transplant Patient

Diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis as a baby, Kendra Adderhold struggled to have a normal childhood. Her mother brought her to the Emory Cystic Fibrosis Center for treatment and, until adulthood, things were rather stable. But, after the birth of her son, Kendra’s situation started to change. Her lung function began declining quite rapidly and soon she would need a lung transplant to survive. Hear Kendra’s story as she describes her journey to lung transplant and how the Emory Lung Transplant Program has impacted her life.

Emory Lung Transplant Program

Emory’s McKelvey Lung Transplant Center specializes in the treatment of complex lung disorders and offers the full continuum of sophisticated care involved in lung transplantation. We are dedicated to researching lung disorders and providing the best treatment and care for lung transplant patients.

Emory Transplant Center has the only lung transplant program in the state of Georgia, performing over 450 lung transplant procedures to date. Our goal is to provide patients with end-stage lung disease the unsurpassed care they deserve.

The Powerful Gift of Organ Donation – A Lung Transplant Recipient’s Story

More than 120,000 individuals are waiting for for a transplant. Alice Koone, an Emory lung transplant recipient was one of those people.According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), there are currently more than 120,000 individuals waiting for a transplant. One organ donor can save up to 8 lives, and sadly, 22 people die every day waiting for some type of transplant.

Alice Koone, an Emory lung transplant recipient was one of those individuals awaiting a life-saving transplant.

Alice was in desperate need for a double lung transplant due to severe complications with breathing. At a Talladega Superspeedway race in 2007, she remembers not being able to walk more than 20 feet without having to stop to rest because her lungs were so damaged.

In Jul 2007, Alice was place on oxygen, but her condition didn’t seem to be improving. On Sept. 13, 2007, three months after being placed on the lung transplant waiting list, she received a call that would change her life – she would receive a lung transplant that day with the Emory Transplant Center.

Neile Chesnut, an Emory heart transplant coordinator, said most people don’t understand how important it is to become an organ donor. Liver, heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas and small intestine are among organs that can be donated.

Chesnut says one of the best parts of working with pre- and post-transplants patients includes getting to know the individuals as they wait, sometimes several months, for a transplant.

“I feel like they are my family,” said Chesnut.

A year after receiving her transplant at Emory University Hospital, Alice wanted to write a “thank you” note to her donor family, but she could not go through with it.

“How do you thank somebody for this?” she wondered.

But on her second transplant anniversary, she finally wrote that letter to the donor family. Alice, now 54, spends time with her baby grandson and volunteers as a mentor for the Georgia Transplant Foundation.

“I’m able to do a lot of the things I thought I would never be able to do again,” she said. “We are able to travel, camp, hike and just enjoy life. You are thankful for everyday that you get.”

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*Blog adapted from story written by Marisa Stout. Marisa is a senior at the University of Georgia majoring in public relations. Her passion for transplant stemmed from her grandfather’s need for a heart transplant. He received his life-saving transplant at Emory in 2004, and is doing well today.

Marisa says, “I wrote this piece because I feel as a college student writing a piece on organ donation, I can send a message about this important cause to my generation.” And of course, Marisa is an organ donor herself.

Giving the Gift of Live: Understanding Organ Donation Live Chat- April 12, 2016

organ-donor260x200April serves as National Donate Life month – raising awareness around organ donation and celebrating those who have given the precious gift of life to another. Currently more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting a life saving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Understandably, potential donors may have reservations about organ donation.

To get the facts and learn more about organ donation, join Sharon Mathews, MS, RN, CPTC, of the Emory Transplant Center for a live chat on Tuesday, April 12th from Noon – 1PM. She will answer all of your questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. She will also discuss Emory Transplant Center’s living donor and paired donor exchange programs.

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Emory Transplant Center Ranks 7th Nationally

The Emory Transplant Center ranks 7th among transplant programs across the nation based on adult transplant volumes. In calendar year 2014, we performed 441 adult transplants that placed us 7th overall, tied with Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Our top 10 ranking puts us among good company.

 

 

 

 

 

And with the recent release of the latest Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) data, it revealed that all Emory solid organ programs, when risk-adjusted, are similar to if not statistically different from the national data and meet expectations for performance set by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Membership Professional Standards Committee (MPSC).

The new SRTR center-specific data included the following one-year graft and patient survival rates for our patients:

Heart:
Patient survival rate: 90.4% (actual) vs. 90.75% (expected)
Graft survival rate: 80.95% (actual) vs. 84.3% (expected)

Kidney:
Patient survival: 98.1% (actual) vs. 97.4% (expected)
Graft survival: 95% (actual) vs. 94.4% (expected)

Kidney/Pancreas:
Patient survival: 100% (actual) vs. 97.9% (expected)
Graft survival: 100% (actual) vs. 95.8% (expected)

Liver:
Patient survival: 93.8% (actual) vs. 91.6% (expected)
Graft survival: 91.7% (actual) vs. 89.2% (expected)

Lung:
Patient survival: 84.7% (actual) vs. 87.1% (expected)
Graft survival: 84.5% (actual) vs. 90% (expected)

*adults; cohort 1/1/12 – 6/30/14 (deaths and re-transplants were counted as graft failures)

Also of note, the Emory Kidney Transplant program’s three-year graft survival remains statistically greater than expected (p < 0.05) with outcomes of 89.48% (actual) vs. 86.29% (expected).

Our experience coupled with continued excellent outcomes in all solid organ programs make the Emory Transplant Center a leading transplant destination in the Southeast and the nation, serving patients in Georgia and bordering states. We are proud to be your transplant center.

Finding a Better Antifungal Agent for Lung Transplant Patients

Transplant_7-16Because human airways are open to airborne fungal spores and pathogens, lung transplant patients are especially susceptible to infections, a major cause of post-transplant disease and even death. A reliable means of preventing fungal infection in lung transplant patients is the drug posaconazole. Even though it serves well for preventing infection, the oral suspension has poor bioavailability, or absorption into the bloodstream, and patients need to have low gastric pH and high dietary fat intake for adequate systemic exposure.

In November 2013, the FDA approved a new formulation, a posaconazole extended-release tablet, which doctors at Emory Transplant Center began prescribing to patients because of its predictable absorption and improved systemic exposure.

“The purpose of the research study was to compare the oral suspension with the extended-release tablets and determine the likelihood of achieving therapeutic posaconazole levels, which provides the optimal benefit for patients,” says Michael Hurtik, clinical pharmacist for the heart and lung transplant programs, who was the first author on the study. He and the team’s pulmonologists, including Emory Lung Transplant Program medical director, Dr. David Neujahr, looked at data from a cohort of Emory Transplant Center patients who received single or bilateral lung transplantation between January 2013 and October 2014, and were treated for four months post-transplant with nebulized amphotericin and posaconazole oral suspension or the extended-release tablets.

The results showed that the use of the new posaconazole extended-release tablets resulted in therapeutic blood levels for fungal prophylaxis more often (87% of patients) than the oral suspension formulation (39%). The lung transplant patients studied also tolerated the tablets well and no one needed a dose reduction or discontinuation of the medication. This study was successful in finding a better antifungal agent for our lung transplant patients that also provides the most optimal health benefit.

Learn more about the Emory Transplant Center.

Lung Transplants Received from Heavy Drinkers Linked to Higher Complication Risks

Drinking in Transplant DonorsIn a recent study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, researchers suggest that lung transplant recipients who received lungs from donors who were heavy drinkers may be more likely to develop higher complication risks.

The study looked at 173 lung transplant patients. Of the 173 participants, 1/4 of them received lungs from heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, according to the researchers, was defined as more than three drinks a day or seven drinks a week for women, and more than four drinks a day or 14 drinks a week for men.

When researchers compared patients who received lungs from nondrinkers, those who received lungs from heavy drinkers were nearly nine times more likely to develop a complication called severe primary graft dysfunction (PGD).

PGD is a syndrome of acute lung injury that generally occurs within the first 72 hours after lung transplantation, and may lead to an increased risk of rejection.

Dr. David Guidot, of Emory University School of Medicine, said the findings raise “the question as to whether or not a history of heavy alcohol use by a potential donor should exclude the use of their lungs in transplantation. At a time when there is a critical shortage of lungs available for transplantation, this is obviously a problematic issue,” he said.

Guidot added that if other studies confirm these findings, the lung transplant community would have to address this issue. Excluding donor lungs from heavy drinkers is one option. But he also suggested that it is possible that a drug might be developed to counteract the effects of alcohol abuse on the lungs.

Emory Transplant Center Patients Represent Georgia in the Transplant Games of America

Transplant Games of AmericaThe competition was fierce this summer in the muggy Texas heat as Team Georgia participated in and watched athletic competitions at the Transplant Games of America at Rice University in Houston.

The team had 27 athletes representing six transplant centers from Georgia as well as 32 sports fans cheering on the athletes. The team had three donor family members, four living donors, 19 organ transplant recipients, and one cornea recipient who all brought home a total of 48 medals. Co-captains Joe Stott (heart recipient, Emory) and Sherrell Gay (heart and heart/kidney recipient, Emory) led the delegation.

We are so proud of our Emory Transplant Center athletes that we just couldn’t resist listing their names.

Here were their accomplishments:

Heart Transplant

  • Doug Austin — doubles golf (silver) and singles golf
  • Tim Lamberg — singles golf (gold), doubles golf (silver) and 5K run/walk
  • Joe Stott — singles bowling (bronze), 5K and doubles bowling
  • Richard Walker — mixed doubles tennis (gold), singles tennis, table tennis, and 5K
  • Malia Veator — 5K (gold), 1500m (gold), 100m (silver), 800m (silver), and mixed doubles tennis (gold)

Heart/Kidney

  • Sherrell Gay — cornhole game, table tennis and 5K

Kidney

  • Kevin Schneider (living donor) — singles golf (gold) and trivia games

Liver Transplant

  • Sharon Jean Cyprien — 400m (gold), 200m (gold) and 100m (silver)

Lung Transplant

  • Keith Harris — 5K and singles golf

“We feel our supporters/fans are so important to our wellbeing,” reports Gay, “so I have to mention we had two mascots. Tim Lamburg’s daughter dressed as ‘Peachy’ and Joe Stott’s 84-year-old mother-in-law was ‘Mrs. Peanut.'”

Way to go, Team Georgia!

Lung Transplant – One Woman’s Success Story

Harriet Boger, Lung Transplant Patient

Author: Harriet Boger, Lung Transplant Recipient

As I write this blog, I am on Marco Island with my sister. We played 18 holes of golf, walking the course and pulling our carts. We also play tennis every afternoon and have played both bocce ball and croquet too. I walk on the beach every day (of course, always wearing a cover-up and hat as directed by my doctor), and reflect on my life. This is definitely something I could not have done the 2 years before my transplant.

I am so thankful for every breath that I take, and want to share my story to give people hope.

Road to transplant…

I had my transplant on February 26, 2008 – that was just 4 short years ago. I clearly remember the day I was told that I had Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

I used to love to hike in the North Carolina Mountains, but was finding it harder and harder to breathe when I was walking. I thought perhaps it was because I was not exercising enough so I tried to be more active but the shortness of breath continued. I decided it was time to see my doctor about this and in August of 2004 I was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). I remember the day my doctor called and told me. After the news, I immediately hung up and went on-line to look up the condition. I read that there was no cure, and that as it got worse there would be unrelenting suffocation. And most of all I was shocked to read that the life expectancy for this disease was 3-5 years. I was alone and burst into tears.

For the next three years my lungs rapidly declined. I did not want anyone to know. My PCP sent me to a pulmonologist who was trying to treat the disease with steroids and harsh antibiotics but the ability to breath only got worse. I told my husband and finally my sister. She too looked up the disease and kept suggesting that I look into having a lung transplant, but that thought was just too foreign to me. My sister called the IPF Foundation and she tried her best to convince me that a transplant was my only hope of survival.

By Christmas 2007 I was in a wheel chair and tethered to a 25-foot tube. In one month I had gone from only needing up to 6 liters of oxygen (not great, but could manage with a dainty oxygen tank that I carried in my handbag) to needing 12 liters and having to stay home tethered to larger oxygen concentrator which would not function if my cord was longer than 25 feet. My life changed from being filled with activities to sitting on a sofa by day and being so exhausted by eating or dressing or doing anything that I looked forward to night and sleeping.

The decision…

I remember that Christmas in 2007, my son and his fiancé were visiting. My son saw that I was getting sicker by the day. I was unable to even stand up without gasping for breath. My son sat on my bed one night and said, “Mom, I want to walk you down the aisle at my wedding in May and that is 5 months away. I want you to live. You can’t wait any longer, you have to do something.” I decided to get listed for a transplant. My sister had researched possible centers, and thought I should to Barnes at St Lewis because they performed the first lung transplant. But a dear friend, Dr. Fray Marshall, told me about the Emory Transplant Center and that they had an excellent Lung Transplant program.

Gaining my life back…

During my downward spiral I could do virtually nothing for a year before my transplant. Since my recovery I have resumed my normal routine. I am back to hiking and trying to play golf, croquet and bridge. I have no restrictions as far as activities. But to prevent exposure to bacteria which can cause infections, I can no longer enjoy my two favorite foods, raw oysters or steak tartar. The only other restriction is staying out of the sun without a hat and sunscreen, which most people my age should do anyway so that is not an issue.

But also giving back…

How could I not want to give back to the community? I was almost dead and someone gave me my life back, the most precious gift anyone can give. I am so grateful and thankful for my donor and transplant team that all I want to do is help in any way possible. I go to three support groups at different hospitals and visit patients and their families whenever I am asked to do so. I am a Family/Patient Advisor for Emory and on the Unit Practice Council for 5BS (the transplant floor at Emory University Hospital). I attend pre-transplant meetings answering questions from patients. The doctors can tell patients about the transplant but they want to know from me how it will feel. I believe I was predestined to have an illness that lead to this transplant so I can be a vessel for God and do the things I now do to help patients and families. I hope to do more to help raise awareness for the importance of organ donation.

A huge thank you to Emory…

From the time I first walked into Emory, when my doctors took a chance and put me on the transplant list, until I was transplanted worked like clockwork. The most important thing was the care and compassion of my whole transplant team, including doctors, nurses and staff. My surgeon was dedicated, caring and precise. My nurses on the Emory Transplant unit catered to my every need. The transplant coordinators conditioned me to the new lifestyle of pills and post-transplant regimen. They worked together so beautifully and were deeply passionate about both their work and their patients. This was so evident in the way they worked together and this respect for each other reverberated throughout and made such a difference.

A huge thank you to organ donors…

The greatest gift of love that anyone could ever give is the gift of life. When that gift is given a life lives on. I feel the spirit of my donor in me and only wish I knew who she or he was so I could thank their family personally and learn more about that person. I feel I am more compassionate than I was before the transplant, and I think it was gained from the spirit of my unknown donor. I feel that person living in me sometimes and that makes me want to be a better person. Thank you to all the organ donors out there! You are all heroes!

Related Resources:

Top Transplant Doctors in Atlanta are at Emory

Each year, Atlanta magazine recognizes the top doctors in the metro Atlanta area as ranked by a thorough physician-led research process. The 2011 Atlanta Magazine Top Docs list included 318 doctors from across the Atlanta area and across specialties, highlighting the cream of the crop in specialties ranging from pediatric to geriatric services and everything in between. We’re very pleased to announce that not only can you find over 100 of the doctors recognized this year here at Emory, seven of them are our very own transplant team members!

Our Emory Transplant Center and its physician team are unique in that they are part of a multidisciplinary team providing care in seven core transplant specialty areas: kidney transplant, pancreas transplant, heart transplant, hand transplant, islet transplant, liver transplant & lung transplant. All of our doctors here at Emory Healthcare play a role in changing and saving lives, but often times our transplant team and the treatments they provide touch the lives of our patients and their families on a deeper level. And more often than not, receiving treatment from our transplant specialists is their last, if not only option. Thankfully, based on our program’s rankings, both from a statistical post-transplant quality outcome perspective, and the perspective of the physician research team, researchers at Castle Connolly Medical LTD, and Atlanta Magazine, the Emory Transplant Center is a great option to have.

We again congratulate each of our transplant surgeons for their dedication to providing outstanding patient centered care for our patients and families faced with less than idea circumstances that can warrant organ transplantation. It is because of our multidisciplinary team of transplant specialists and their compassion, that recognition such as the Atlanta Top Doctors rankings is given. If you’d like to shout out a particular transplant doctor who has impacted your life, please do so in the comments below. You can also find the listing of transplant surgeons recognized in this year’s rankings below. If you’re interested, check out the full list of Emory Healthcare doctors recognized as the best doctors in Atlanta.

Pancreas & Kidney Transplant Doctors:

  • Chris Larsen, MD, DPhil – Transplant Surgeon
  • Kenneth Newell, MD – Transplant Surgeon

Liver Transplant Doctors:

  • Stuart Knecthle, MD – Transplant Surgeon

Lung Transplant Doctors:

  • Seth Force, MD – Transplant Surgeon

Heart Transplant Doctors:

  • Andrew Smith, MD – Transplant Surgeon
  • Javed Butler, MD – Cardiologist

Hand Transplant Doctors:

  • Linda Cendales, MD – Transplant Surgeon