Posts Tagged ‘living donor’

Organ Donation Awareness – 4 Your Life 5K

Emory 5K for organ donation awareness

L–R: Dr. Wedd, Rachel P., Jennifer G.

Emory Transplant Center contributed to organ donation awareness on Sunday, April 23rd by participating in Donate Life of Georgia’s 4th annual Run, 4 Your Life 5K at Piedmont Park. The morning started off cloudy with the threat of rain, but that didn’t prevent Emory’s team of physicians, researchers, and nurses from participating in this important event.

The rain held off as the over 250 registrants crossed the finish line to raise awareness of organ donation and celebrate those who have given the precious gift of life to another. The Emory Transplant team consisted of 15 employees who helped support the cause. They represented clinicians and staff from our liver transplant, kidney transplant, and lung transplant programs, as well as our team of clinical researchers.

Comradery, Awareness, and Passion

Rachel Patzer, Ph.D., MPH, a clinical researcher in Emory’s Division of Transplantation and the Emory Transplant Center, served as captain of the Emory Transplant team. She wanted to pull together a team to build comradery among the Transplant Center staff, as well as raise money for organ donation awareness efforts, something that the Emory Transplant Center firmly stands behind.

Rachel’s work in transplantation is her passion. She has had family members that have been touched by transplant and understands the power of organ donation and how it can save a life.

“I think people who are willing to donate their organs to help save a life are truly amazing individuals – I think it is so inspirational,” says Patzer.

Rachel won 1st place female and placed 4th overall – icing on the cake – second to spreading the message of organ donation awareness.

All monies raised through this annual event are used to assist Donate Life Georgia in its mission to educate Georgians on the need for organ, eye, and tissue donation, and to motivate the public to become organ donors.

And when asked if Rachel is a registered organ donor herself, her answer, “Of course!”

Donate Life of Georgia is one of 50 local non-profit coalitions affiliated with Donate Life America, Inc. and works to spread unified organ donation awareness messaging to Americans about the importance of organ, tissue and eye donation.

Learn more about Emory’s Transplant Center, offering Georgia’s most comprehensive organ transplant program.

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Emory Transplant Center Ranked Second Largest Kidney Paired Donor Program

Emory Transplant CenterEmory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). ended 2016 with a bang. Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). Our last transplant for 2016 set a new record for us at 55 kidney paired donor transplants in a single month.

We ended 2016 with 399 transplants facilitated, an increase of 11% over 2015. We expect to cross the 2,000 program-to-date milestone by the end of this month.

Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and has been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012. Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.

According to Sharon Mathews, Lead Coordinator of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program, “Living donation can provide end-stage renal disease [ESRD] patients with a better chance of finding a compatible match and improve their outcomes and quality of life than a deceased donor match. Living donation, especially when facilitated by the NKR, a national paired donor exchange program, can speed the process to find compatible donors for patients and reduce wait times.”

We want to thank everyone for your hard work and support in 2016 – another great year for our Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program.

Stranger Gives Holiday Gift to Georgia Teen

This time of year, during the holiday season, most people are shopping for family and loved ones trying to find that perfect gift. Well, a 16-year old Georgia teen received that perfect gift from a complete stranger – she received the gift of life.

Kelly Bundick, a 42-year old medical sales rep and single mother of a 5-year old son and a 12-year old daughter, decided to donate one of her kidneys to the Georgia teen. Kelly saw a photo of the teenager on the Callaway Facebook page. You may remember Raleigh Callaway, a kidney transplant recipient who received a lot of media attention when his wife posted a message on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” They were able to find a donor, and Raleigh had his kidney transplant surgery at Emory. To give back, the Callaway family continues the Callaway Facebook page to spread the word for others who are in need of a kidney and searching for a living donor.

This was the first time a child had been featured on the Callaway Facebook page, and Kelly knew she had to help the teen.

Watch the video below to see how the story unfolds…this truly is the holiday of giving.

Dr. Nicole Turgeon, who performed Kelly’s operation, is Director of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program. The Emory Transplant Center has a well-established program, performing more than 1,200 living donor transplants to date.

“I really cherish the opportunity to work with these donors because they put themselves in harm’s way,” Dr. Turgeon says. “So, I feel a tremendous amount of responsibility to them as well as to the potential recipient.”

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Emory Transplant Center’s Living Donor Wall Has 85 New Names

new namesWe are proud to announce that 85 new names have been added to the Emory Transplant Center Living Donor Wall. Spanning one entire wall of the Transplant Center, the Living Donor Wall made its debut in 2007. Since its premiere, we are happy to report that we have had to expand it a total of three times, with additions made in 2009, 2011 and 2013. Today, the wall displays nearly 500 selfless individuals who have donated organs along with the relationship they have to their recipients.

This is just another reminder of how much the Emory Living Donor Kidney Program has grown in recent years. In addition, it is a testament to the amazing life-saving and life-enhancing gifts our living donors make to transplant recipients.

Our Living Donor Wall pays tribute to the individuals named there as tangible depictions of the ultimate gift given to another.

The next time you visit Emory Transplant Center, please take a moment to view the Living Donor Wall and acknowledge those who have given the gift of life.

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Your Organ Donation Questions Answered: Takeaways from Our Live Chat

organ-donor260x200Thank you to everyone who joined us for Emory Transplant Center’s live web chat on the topic of organ donation. With April serving as Donate Life month, we wanted to raise awareness around organ donation and answer your specific questions. Lead Transplant Coordinator, Sharon Mathews, MS, RN, CPTC, answered questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. She also discussed Emory Transplant Center’s living donor and paired donor exchange programs.

Below are just a few highlights from the chat. If you missed this informative chat, check out the full list of questions and answers located on our chat transcript. You may also visit the Emory Transplant Center website for more information. And for more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net.

Question: How long can an organ stay viable during transport?

Sharon Mathews: For solid organs, heart and lungs are viable for 4-6 hours, livers up to 12 hours, the pancreas is viable for 12-18 hours and kidneys remain viable up to 24- 30 hours on ice. The goal is to transplant the organs within 8 hours or less of being recovered.

Question: Do you have to be on kidney dialysis before you can be put on the wait list for a kidney?

Sharon Mathews: No, if you have been referred to a transplant center and are undergoing evaluation for transplant, you can have potential living donors call in on your behalf. The initial screening tests can be done at this point in the process. However, you will not become active on the UNOS wait list until your kidney function meets protocol for transplantation.

Question: If my blood type doesn’t match my recipient’s what are my options?

Sharon Mathews: At Emory we are involved with the National Kidney Registry (a paired donor exchange program). In a paired exchange, a donor will donate their kidney to another recipient in exchange for a compatible kidney for their loved one. This can occur on the same day. So while they didn’t walk away with your kidney, they received a kidney that was the best match donor possible.

Currently more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting a life-saving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Perhaps the most important message from the live chat is the one on the importance of organ donation and how it can have a huge impact on people’s lives.

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Giving the Gift of Life: Former Marine Donates Kidney to National Guardsman

MarineGuardsmanPhotoThe Emory Transplant Center loves to share heartwarming stories that happen right here in our Center. As we celebrate Donate Life month, we would like to honor those who have graciously made the decision to give the gift life. Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, is one of those individuals. He made the decision to donate one of his kidneys to help out a fellow serviceman.

It all started with a plea for help via social media. Suffering with Stage 4 kidney disease, 28-year-old Dustin Brown, Army National Guardsman, relied on dialysis machines to rid his body of waste, salt and water that his failing kidneys could no longer do. Doctors told him a kidney transplant was needed.

Dustin connected with Kristi and Raleigh Callaway. Raleigh Callaway, a Greensboro, Georgia, police officer, received a new kidney in 2014 following a Facebook post publicly appealing for help.

Soon Brown, posing with his wife and five-year-old son, had a similar Facebook post on the Callaway’s page, desperately searching for a new kidney.

Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, saw the plea for help and contacted Kristi Callaway and the Emory Kidney Transplant Program. A few weeks later, 44-year-old Jeffords learned he was a match for Brown.

“I have never thought about donating a kidney to anyone, but when I saw another serviceman’s need for help, I wanted to help,” says Jeffords. “The testing and donating processes are simple.”

Living donor kidney transplants, such as this one, make the wait times shorter for critically-ill patients, while also providing the greatest chances for long-term success,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, surgical director of the Paired Donor Kidney Exchange Program at Emory Transplant Center.

“I am so thankful for Temple,” said Brown, just days after his kidney transplant surgery. “Brothers in arms are always brothers, no matter what. He is a super hero in our family.”

Watch the story featured on ABC News here.

Watch the story featured on Fox News here.

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about kidney transplant and the Emory Living Donor Kidney Program 

Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s Organ Donation and Paired Donor Exchange Live Chat

organ donation monthThank you to everyone who joined us during National Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon answered questions about organ donation, including paired donor exchange – what it is, how it works and how paired donor exchange is helping patients get a second chance at life.

Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one on the importance of organ donation and how it can have a huge impact on people’s lives.

We were thrilled with the number of people who registered and were able to participate in the chat. The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer so we have answered them below for your reference.

If you missed this informative chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers located on our chat transcript. You may also visit the Emory Transplant Center website for more information. And for more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net.

Question: My grandmother is on dialysis and she is 73. Can she be placed on the waitlist for transplant? 

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Before anyone can be placed on the wait list for organ transplantation, he/she will need to be evaluated by a transplant physician to determine if he/she meets medical criteria for transplant, e.g. is the patient healthy and strong enough for transplant. There are also criteria around patient support care as well as financial requirements. We are happy to evaluate your grandmother. To schedule an appointment for evaluation, call 1-855-EMORYTX (366-7989). It is a toll free number.

Question: Will kidney donation affect pregnancy?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Women who donate a kidney can become pregnant after donation and deliver healthy babies. But we do recommend waiting 1 year after donation to become pregnant in order to heal from surgery and for your kidney function to be stable.

 

 

Question: What is the kidney donor waiting list exchange?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: If a paired exchange cannot be found, living donors in certain areas of the country may be eligible for living kidney donor list exchange. In this type of exchange, a kidney donor who is not compatible with their intended recipient offers to donate to a stranger on the waiting list. In return, the intended recipient advances on the waiting list for a deceased donor kidney. This type of living donation is also referred to living donor/deceased exchange.

 

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Turgeon, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript.

If you have any questions for the doctor, do not hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

 

Truly Thankful – Update on Veteran Police Officer and Altruistic Donor

Raleigh Callaway

Raleigh Callaway and Chris Carroll

As you may remember, it all started with a Facebook post. Raleigh Callaway received a lot of media attention when his wife posted a message on Facebook sharing Raleigh’s need for a kidney. The post resulted in thousands of people contacting the Emory Transplant Center with offers of help. But it was one man from Texas who heard his story, and gave the gift of life – a new kidney. Chris Carroll, who lives near Dallas, says he saw the Callaway family pictured on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” Chris said he felt divinely led to call to see if he could become a donor.

“I’m just blessed to be able to do it,” Carroll said in one of the many TV interviews the two have conducted after their donor and transplant operations. The media coverage has spread far and wide — from the U.S. to the U.K., Australia and Japan. You can check out some of the stories at these Atlanta outlets: AJC.com, WAGA-TV, WSB-TV, and WGCL-TV.

Carroll’s and Callaway’s surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon, says they are both doing “incredibly well.” Callaway hopes to go back to his job as a police investigator in Greensboro, Ga. in a couple of months to continue to support his family. His community will be glad to have him back on the job.

As we reflect on this Thanksgiving holiday and of all that we are thankful for, let’s remember those who have given the generous donation of life through organ transplantation.

Complete Stranger Gives the Gift of Life to a Georgia Police Officer

It all started with a Facebook post…Raleigh Callaway, a veteran Georgia police officer and patient of the Emory Transplant Center, needed a kidney transplant. Desperate to find a match as he entered the late stages of renal failure, he and his family turned to social media to find a potential donor.

The Callaways’ posted a message on Facebook sharing Raleigh’s need for a kidney and a donor. The post resulted in more than 900 people contacting the Emory Transplant Center – one of whom was Chris Carroll, a health care consultant and grandfather from McKinney, Texas. He saw the post and suddenly felt compelled to give.

After going through extensive testing to see if Chris would be a match for Raleigh, the kidney transplant surgery was performed Thursday, September 25, 2014. Emory doctors said that Raleigh and donor Chris both did “incredibly well” following the operation. Chris was discharged from Emory University Hospital on Saturday, and Callaway is expected to be discharged from the hospital on Monday.

Chris was among hundreds who contacted Emory wanting to help. Dr. Nicole Turgeon, Emory transplant surgeon who performed the operation, credits the power of social media for not just saving Raleigh Callaway’s life, but potentially many more. Of the hundreds who contacted Emory, more than 125 people are still being considered for transplant surgeries to other patients. This generous act will continue to give to other patients.

Check out the video below to learn more about this incredible story!

Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s “Kidney Swaps and Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us during Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center transplant surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon discussed the different kinds of living organ donation, the process for living donation and even shared an inspiring video of one of her patients who had benefitted from Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program. Chat participants also had questions about islet cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes, which Dr. Turgeon answered with some great information on the 10th anniversary of two of our patient’s islet cell transplants and being diabetes free! Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one of the importance of organ donation and how it can make such a huge difference in people’s lives. For more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net. Check out more of Dr. Turgeon’s answers by reading the chat transcript!

Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the Emory Transplant Center’s live chat:

Question: How many kidney transplants do you perform at Emory every year?