Posts Tagged ‘kidney transplant’

Emory Transplant Center Ranked Second Largest Kidney Paired Donor Program

Emory Transplant CenterEmory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). ended 2016 with a bang. Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). Our last transplant for 2016 set a new record for us at 55 kidney paired donor transplants in a single month.

We ended 2016 with 399 transplants facilitated, an increase of 11% over 2015. We expect to cross the 2,000 program-to-date milestone by the end of this month.

Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and has been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012. Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.

According to Sharon Mathews, Lead Coordinator of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program, “Living donation can provide end-stage renal disease [ESRD] patients with a better chance of finding a compatible match and improve their outcomes and quality of life than a deceased donor match. Living donation, especially when facilitated by the NKR, a national paired donor exchange program, can speed the process to find compatible donors for patients and reduce wait times.”

We want to thank everyone for your hard work and support in 2016 – another great year for our Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program.

Stranger Gives Holiday Gift to Georgia Teen

This time of year, during the holiday season, most people are shopping for family and loved ones trying to find that perfect gift. Well, a 16-year old Georgia teen received that perfect gift from a complete stranger – she received the gift of life.

Kelly Bundick, a 42-year old medical sales rep and single mother of a 5-year old son and a 12-year old daughter, decided to donate one of her kidneys to the Georgia teen. Kelly saw a photo of the teenager on the Callaway Facebook page. You may remember Raleigh Callaway, a kidney transplant recipient who received a lot of media attention when his wife posted a message on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” They were able to find a donor, and Raleigh had his kidney transplant surgery at Emory. To give back, the Callaway family continues the Callaway Facebook page to spread the word for others who are in need of a kidney and searching for a living donor.

This was the first time a child had been featured on the Callaway Facebook page, and Kelly knew she had to help the teen.

Watch the video below to see how the story unfolds…this truly is the holiday of giving.

Dr. Nicole Turgeon, who performed Kelly’s operation, is Director of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program. The Emory Transplant Center has a well-established program, performing more than 1,200 living donor transplants to date.

“I really cherish the opportunity to work with these donors because they put themselves in harm’s way,” Dr. Turgeon says. “So, I feel a tremendous amount of responsibility to them as well as to the potential recipient.”

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Education & Outreach Increases Kidney Transplant Referrals from Dialysis Centers

two peopleBack in May, Emory Transplant Center announced that they, along with six other transplant centers and organizations in the Southeastern Kidney Transplant Coalition, were awarded $2.6 million by the National Institutes of Minority Health and Health Disparities to continue the Reducing Disparities in Access to Kidney Transplantation Community Study (RaDIANT) in Georgia for another five years and expand it to South Carolina and North Carolina.

We are excited to bring you the initial outcomes of the study. The results were published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Rachel Patzer, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of surgery at Emory University School of Medicine, is first author, and Stephan Pastan, MD, medical director of the kidney and pancreas transplant program at Emory Transplant Center, is senior author.

The RaDIANT study is a multicomponent intervention designed to increase referral of patients on dialysis for transplant evaluation. In December 2013 the research team selected dialysis facilities with either low transplant referral or racial disparities in referral. The intervention, conducted from January to December 2014, included transplant education and engagement activities targeting dialysis facility leadership, staff and patients. These included talks at dialysis centers by former patients, and educational webinars for clinical staff about common barriers faced by patients and potential solutions.

The educational and outreach program in Georgia dialysis centers in 2014 resulted in a 75 percent increase in referrals for kidney transplant evaluation, with the greatest increase among black patients.

“This work could not have been done without our committed group of academic and community partners in our Southeastern Kidney Transplant Coalition”, says Patzer. ”The multicomponent educational and outreach intervention that our Coalition developed together substantially improved kidney transplant referral and reduced racial disparity, and we are working to adapt it for use by other ESRD networks and other members of the kidney community.”

Emory Leads Research on FDA-Approved Drug in HIV Positive Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

pearsonEmory Transplant Center will soon begin enrolling patients into a new clinical trial that will test an FDA-approved drug in HIV positive patients receiving a kidney transplant. The research study will evaluate the safety and tolerability of a drug that blocks the CCR5 receptor. The CCR5 receptor is an entry point that allows HIV into the cells of the immune system. The drug being studied, generic name maraviroc, is an antiretroviral drug that helps block the virus from entering these cells. It is currently FDA-approved for the treatment of HIV infection.

Emory will be one of ten centers across the U.S. that will be play a part in this study. A total of 130 participants with well-controlled HIV infection (must be on an antiretroviral regimen for at least three months) will be randomized into one of two study groups. In the first group, patients will receive maraviroc, with the second group receiving a placebo. Neither doctors nor patients will know if the kidney recipients are receiving the study drug or the placebo (known as the standard of care). Up to 11 participants will be enrolled at Emory.

This $1.6 million research study for all 10 sites combined is supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02741323).

“When it comes to transplanting organs in HIV positive patients, it is known that these patients have more rejection and more severe rejection than non-HIV transplant recipients,” says Thomas Pearson, MD, DPhil, professor of surgery, and executive director of the Emory Transplant Center. “This is likely because their immune systems are dysregulated and some components are overactive. This may contribute to the high rate of transplant rejection.” Dr. Pearson is the principal investigator of the Emory clinical trial.

CCR5 blockade is currently used in combination with other drugs to control HIV infection, but it has not been studied at the time of transplantation in HIV positive individuals.

“This clinical trial will help us better understand the drug’s effects on renal function at 52-weeks post-transplant and if the drug can have a dual effect in controlling the HIV infection and improving kidney transplant outcomes,” explains Dr. Pearson.

All study participants will receive immunosuppressive medications following their transplant, as any transplant patient would. Participants will be followed for up to three years after transplant.

Watch Dr. Pearson on WSB-TV discussing this clinical trial.

In the News: Emory Transplant Center Kidney Living Donor Program

organ-donor260x200Emory Transplant Center has recently made headlines with their Kidney Living Donor Program. Stories featured on FOX NEWS Health and in Atlanta magazine highlight individuals who have given the gift of life through organ donation. One story features Beth Gavin, a medical reporter for FOX5, who altruistically donated her kidney to a stranger that kicked off a string of six transplants. The other highlights an Atlanta police officer who donated a kidney to a stranger to allow his wife to be able to receive a kidney from someone else through paired donor exchange.

A kidney paired donor exchange occurs when a person in need of a kidney transplant has an eligible living donor, but the living donor is unable to give to their intended recipient because they are incompatible. Therefore, an exchange with another donor/recipient pair is made. This kidney paired donation enables two incompatible recipients to receive healthy, more compatible kidneys.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.”

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia.

FOX NEWS Health Story 

Atlanta Magazine Story

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Your Organ Donation Questions Answered: Takeaways from Our Live Chat

organ-donor260x200Thank you to everyone who joined us for Emory Transplant Center’s live web chat on the topic of organ donation. With April serving as Donate Life month, we wanted to raise awareness around organ donation and answer your specific questions. Lead Transplant Coordinator, Sharon Mathews, MS, RN, CPTC, answered questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. She also discussed Emory Transplant Center’s living donor and paired donor exchange programs.

Below are just a few highlights from the chat. If you missed this informative chat, check out the full list of questions and answers located on our chat transcript. You may also visit the Emory Transplant Center website for more information. And for more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net.

Question: How long can an organ stay viable during transport?

Sharon Mathews: For solid organs, heart and lungs are viable for 4-6 hours, livers up to 12 hours, the pancreas is viable for 12-18 hours and kidneys remain viable up to 24- 30 hours on ice. The goal is to transplant the organs within 8 hours or less of being recovered.

Question: Do you have to be on kidney dialysis before you can be put on the wait list for a kidney?

Sharon Mathews: No, if you have been referred to a transplant center and are undergoing evaluation for transplant, you can have potential living donors call in on your behalf. The initial screening tests can be done at this point in the process. However, you will not become active on the UNOS wait list until your kidney function meets protocol for transplantation.

Question: If my blood type doesn’t match my recipient’s what are my options?

Sharon Mathews: At Emory we are involved with the National Kidney Registry (a paired donor exchange program). In a paired exchange, a donor will donate their kidney to another recipient in exchange for a compatible kidney for their loved one. This can occur on the same day. So while they didn’t walk away with your kidney, they received a kidney that was the best match donor possible.

Currently more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting a life-saving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Perhaps the most important message from the live chat is the one on the importance of organ donation and how it can have a huge impact on people’s lives.

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Giving the Gift of Life: Former Marine Donates Kidney to National Guardsman

MarineGuardsmanPhotoThe Emory Transplant Center loves to share heartwarming stories that happen right here in our Center. As we celebrate Donate Life month, we would like to honor those who have graciously made the decision to give the gift life. Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, is one of those individuals. He made the decision to donate one of his kidneys to help out a fellow serviceman.

It all started with a plea for help via social media. Suffering with Stage 4 kidney disease, 28-year-old Dustin Brown, Army National Guardsman, relied on dialysis machines to rid his body of waste, salt and water that his failing kidneys could no longer do. Doctors told him a kidney transplant was needed.

Dustin connected with Kristi and Raleigh Callaway. Raleigh Callaway, a Greensboro, Georgia, police officer, received a new kidney in 2014 following a Facebook post publicly appealing for help.

Soon Brown, posing with his wife and five-year-old son, had a similar Facebook post on the Callaway’s page, desperately searching for a new kidney.

Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, saw the plea for help and contacted Kristi Callaway and the Emory Kidney Transplant Program. A few weeks later, 44-year-old Jeffords learned he was a match for Brown.

“I have never thought about donating a kidney to anyone, but when I saw another serviceman’s need for help, I wanted to help,” says Jeffords. “The testing and donating processes are simple.”

Living donor kidney transplants, such as this one, make the wait times shorter for critically-ill patients, while also providing the greatest chances for long-term success,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, surgical director of the Paired Donor Kidney Exchange Program at Emory Transplant Center.

“I am so thankful for Temple,” said Brown, just days after his kidney transplant surgery. “Brothers in arms are always brothers, no matter what. He is a super hero in our family.”

Watch the story featured on ABC News here.

Watch the story featured on Fox News here.

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about kidney transplant and the Emory Living Donor Kidney Program 

Emory Transplant Center Receives Special Visit from Former NFL Player and Kidney Transplant Recipient

transplantThe Emory Transplant Center received a special visit from former NFL player Donald Jones, who received his own kidney transplant in 2013 following kidney disease. On Wednesday, March 16th, Jones visited with faculty and staff at Emory Transplant Canter and then went on to meet with kidney transplant patients at Emory University Hospital. It was quite a delight for our patients.

Jones was a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills from 2010 to 2012. While playing with the Bills, he began developing high blood pressure and experienced some vision loss. Then the New England Patriots signed him in 2013. But only a few months later, he was diagnosed with IgA nephropathy, a kidney disorder that occurs when IgA, a protein that helps the body fight infections, settles in the kidneys. Treatment for the disorder is dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Jones retired from the NFL in August 2013 at just 25 years old. In December 2013, Jones received a life-saving kidney transplant from his father. Since then, he has been traveling the country raising awareness and fundraising for kidney disease and IgA nephropathy.

Emory Transplant Center faculty and staff had the opportunity to attend a book signing of Jones’ recently published autobiography, The Next Quarter: Scoring Against Kidney Disease. And Emory kidney transplant recipients Robert Burns and Angela Parks, both from Decatur, were delighted to have Jones drop by their Emory University Hospital rooms.

While at Emory, Jones was also interviewed for an educational video about dialysis and kidney transplantation. Rachel Patzer, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of surgery in Emory University School of Medicine and Rollins School of Public Health, recently received funding to develop a video following her research study about kidney transplant rates, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in August 2015.

The study found only about one in four patients with end-stage renal disease in Georgia was referred by a dialysis facility to a transplant center for evaluation within one year of starting dialysis. Patzer hopes the video will educate dialysis patients about transplant as a treatment option and encourage patients to discuss transplant with their providers and family members.

The video, once released, will be distributed to dialysis centers throughout the U.S. that have low rates of transplant or racial disparities in access to transplant.

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about kidney transplant and the Emory Kidney Transplant Program

Giving the Gift of Live: Understanding Organ Donation Live Chat- April 12, 2016

organ-donor260x200April serves as National Donate Life month – raising awareness around organ donation and celebrating those who have given the precious gift of life to another. Currently more than 115,000 men, women and children are awaiting a life saving transplant. They are in need of organs, tissue, and bone marrow which can all be transplanted if donors were available, giving recipients a second chance at life. Understandably, potential donors may have reservations about organ donation.

To get the facts and learn more about organ donation, join Sharon Mathews, MS, RN, CPTC, of the Emory Transplant Center for a live chat on Tuesday, April 12th from Noon – 1PM. She will answer all of your questions about organ donation, including how many people are currently waiting for an organ, what organs can be donated, and who can donate. She will also discuss Emory Transplant Center’s living donor and paired donor exchange programs.

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Belatacept Provides Better Kidney Survival Rates than Current Standard of Care

transplant drugA study of kidney transplant recipients has shown for the first time that the drug belatacept (Nulojix), which controls the immune system and prevents graft rejection, has a better record of patient and organ survival than a calcineurin inhibitor, the current standard of care.

Patients who have undergone kidney transplant are required to take medications to prevent their immune systems from rejecting their new organs. A calcineurin inhibitor (CNIs) is generally used for post kidney transplant patients, but long-term use can damage transplanted kidneys and may lead to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Belatacept acts as a “co-stimulation blocker,” inhibiting one of two signals the T cells need to trigger an immune response. And unlike the currently used CNIs, it is not toxic to the kidney. In fact, it helps preserve the function of the kidney over the long term and is more effective in suppressing antibodies against the kidney, which are important causes of organ loss.

Emory University School of Medicine Dean and kidney and pancreas transplant surgeon, Dr. Christian Larsen, played a key role in developing belatacept, together with Emory Transplant Center Executive Director and Livingston Professor of Surgery, Dr. Thomas Pearson. Belatacept was approved by the FDA in 2011 and is produced by Bristol Myers Squibb.

The study, called BENEFIT (Belatacept Evaluation of Nephroprotection and Efficacy as First-line Immunosuppression Trial), was sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb and began in 2006. FDA approval of belatacept in 2011 was partly based on the first three years of results. Results from the worldwide study, led by Dr. Larsen and University of California San Francisco kidney transplant surgeon, Dr. Flavio Vincenti, were published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The seven-year, multi-center study showed that kidney transplant recipients taking belatacept experienced a rate of mortality and graft loss significantly lower than patients taking a CNI-based regimen. The risk of death or loss of the transplanted kidney after seven years was 12.7 percent for belatacept, compared to 21.7 percent for cyclosporine A.
“While the best uses of belatacept still need additional definition, these results indicate that using belatacept as standard of care has the potential to improve long-term outcomes that matter to patients,” says Dr. Larsen.

Belatacept is given by infusion monthly at a doctor’s office, in contrast to CNIs, which are taken in daily pills at home. Many U.S. insurance companies now cover belatacept as medically necessary for kidney transplant patients.