Posts Tagged ‘kidney paired donor exchange program’

Emory Transplant Center Ranked Second Largest Kidney Paired Donor Program

Emory Transplant CenterEmory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). ended 2016 with a bang. Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program was ranked the second largest paired donor program in the country through the National Kidney Registry (NKR). Our last transplant for 2016 set a new record for us at 55 kidney paired donor transplants in a single month.

We ended 2016 with 399 transplants facilitated, an increase of 11% over 2015. We expect to cross the 2,000 program-to-date milestone by the end of this month.

Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and has been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012. Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.

According to Sharon Mathews, Lead Coordinator of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program, “Living donation can provide end-stage renal disease [ESRD] patients with a better chance of finding a compatible match and improve their outcomes and quality of life than a deceased donor match. Living donation, especially when facilitated by the NKR, a national paired donor exchange program, can speed the process to find compatible donors for patients and reduce wait times.”

We want to thank everyone for your hard work and support in 2016 – another great year for our Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program.

National Kidney Registry Awards Emory Transplant Center Coordinator for Quick Actions

Dr. Nicole Turgeon (left) and Sharon Matthews (right)

Dr. Nicole Turgeon (left) and Sharon Matthews (right)

The National Kidney Registry (NKR) has awarded Sharon Mathews, Lead Coordinator of Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program, with its Grace Under Pressure Award. The NKR’s medical board voted for Mathews and a transplant coordinator from the University of Wisconsin – Madison, to receive the Grace Under Pressure Awards for their careful maneuvers and quick actions that led to a series of successful kidney transplants last summer. The NKR presents this award to an individual or organization that goes beyond what is expected and takes extraordinary measures to accelerate the practice of paired donor kidney exchange, resulting in the facilitation of more successful transplants.

The series of events began in July 2015 when a Good Samaritan donor started the chain in Madison, Wisconsin. The donor wanted to altruistically donate her kidney sometime in a five-day window so that she could recover in time for her college classes to start in the fall. The NKR identified a four-way swap that included a 14-year-old kidney transplant candidate at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Doctors accepted the donor’s offer, Emory’s HLA lab completed physical crossmatching and the NKR finalized the swap logistics. All seemed ready to go.

A week before the scheduled surgeries, the paired donor in position 3 of the four-way swap decided against donating. The planned recipient of this kidney was an adult patient at Emory Transplant Center. So the centers quickly identified a “repair” option — the donor in position 2 could step in and donate a kidney to the position 3 candidate. Emory’s HLA lab performed a virtual crossmatch for the candidate. But then a few days before surgery, the candidate’s donor developed an elevated liver enzyme count and was ruled out. The centers identified a second repair option using virtual crossmatching and quickly solved this problem.

“Both of our centers [Emory and UW-Madison] worked hard to save the entire swap through the challenges that unfolded in the last several days before the scheduled transplant,” says Mathews.
Thanks to Mathews and her team’s hard work and the generosity of the altruistic donor in Madison, the swap began as planned, and the patient at Children’s received a living donor kidney. And at the end of the chain, the Emory waitlisted patient received a well-matched transplanted kidney as needed.

Mathews received the award on behalf of her team at the NKR’s Season of Miracles awards gala in New York City on May 4. “I dedicated my award to the entire Emory team that helped make these transplants successful, and I thanked my husband for his support,” says Mathews. “Living donor swaps/exchanges require tremendous coordination and expertise by our HLA lab, transplant surgeons, nephrologists, anesthesiologists, transplant clinic staff, bedside nurses, and O.R. staff. They all made it happen.”

In the News: Emory Transplant Center Kidney Living Donor Program

organ-donor260x200Emory Transplant Center has recently made headlines with their Kidney Living Donor Program. Stories featured on FOX NEWS Health and in Atlanta magazine highlight individuals who have given the gift of life through organ donation. One story features Beth Gavin, a medical reporter for FOX5, who altruistically donated her kidney to a stranger that kicked off a string of six transplants. The other highlights an Atlanta police officer who donated a kidney to a stranger to allow his wife to be able to receive a kidney from someone else through paired donor exchange.

A kidney paired donor exchange occurs when a person in need of a kidney transplant has an eligible living donor, but the living donor is unable to give to their intended recipient because they are incompatible. Therefore, an exchange with another donor/recipient pair is made. This kidney paired donation enables two incompatible recipients to receive healthy, more compatible kidneys.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.”

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia.

FOX NEWS Health Story 

Atlanta Magazine Story

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