Posts Tagged ‘emory kidney transplant program’

In the News: Emory Transplant Center Kidney Living Donor Program

organ-donor260x200Emory Transplant Center has recently made headlines with their Kidney Living Donor Program. Stories featured on FOX NEWS Health and in Atlanta magazine highlight individuals who have given the gift of life through organ donation. One story features Beth Gavin, a medical reporter for FOX5, who altruistically donated her kidney to a stranger that kicked off a string of six transplants. The other highlights an Atlanta police officer who donated a kidney to a stranger to allow his wife to be able to receive a kidney from someone else through paired donor exchange.

A kidney paired donor exchange occurs when a person in need of a kidney transplant has an eligible living donor, but the living donor is unable to give to their intended recipient because they are incompatible. Therefore, an exchange with another donor/recipient pair is made. This kidney paired donation enables two incompatible recipients to receive healthy, more compatible kidneys.

“Emory began its Kidney Paired Donor Exchange Program in 2010, and we have been participating in the National Kidney Registry since 2012,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, associate professor of surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and surgical director of the Paired Donor Exchange Program. “Paired donor exchange gives patients an opportunity to receive a living donor kidney transplant from a loved one or friend, despite incompatible blood types and positive crossmatches. In paired donation, a donor and recipient are matched with another incompatible donor and recipient pair, and the kidneys are exchanged between the pairs.”

According to Dr. Turgeon, there are currently more than 100,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list. The discrepancy between the number of organs available and the number of people on the waiting list continues to grow. The Emory Transplant Center is the state’s largest transplant center performing the highest volume of kidney transplants in Georgia.

FOX NEWS Health Story 

Atlanta Magazine Story

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Giving the Gift of Life: Former Marine Donates Kidney to National Guardsman

MarineGuardsmanPhotoThe Emory Transplant Center loves to share heartwarming stories that happen right here in our Center. As we celebrate Donate Life month, we would like to honor those who have graciously made the decision to give the gift life. Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, is one of those individuals. He made the decision to donate one of his kidneys to help out a fellow serviceman.

It all started with a plea for help via social media. Suffering with Stage 4 kidney disease, 28-year-old Dustin Brown, Army National Guardsman, relied on dialysis machines to rid his body of waste, salt and water that his failing kidneys could no longer do. Doctors told him a kidney transplant was needed.

Dustin connected with Kristi and Raleigh Callaway. Raleigh Callaway, a Greensboro, Georgia, police officer, received a new kidney in 2014 following a Facebook post publicly appealing for help.

Soon Brown, posing with his wife and five-year-old son, had a similar Facebook post on the Callaway’s page, desperately searching for a new kidney.

Former Marine, Temple Jeffords, saw the plea for help and contacted Kristi Callaway and the Emory Kidney Transplant Program. A few weeks later, 44-year-old Jeffords learned he was a match for Brown.

“I have never thought about donating a kidney to anyone, but when I saw another serviceman’s need for help, I wanted to help,” says Jeffords. “The testing and donating processes are simple.”

Living donor kidney transplants, such as this one, make the wait times shorter for critically-ill patients, while also providing the greatest chances for long-term success,” says Nicole Turgeon, MD, surgical director of the Paired Donor Kidney Exchange Program at Emory Transplant Center.

“I am so thankful for Temple,” said Brown, just days after his kidney transplant surgery. “Brothers in arms are always brothers, no matter what. He is a super hero in our family.”

Watch the story featured on ABC News here.

Watch the story featured on Fox News here.

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about kidney transplant and the Emory Living Donor Kidney Program 

Belatacept Provides Better Kidney Survival Rates than Current Standard of Care

transplant drugA study of kidney transplant recipients has shown for the first time that the drug belatacept (Nulojix), which controls the immune system and prevents graft rejection, has a better record of patient and organ survival than a calcineurin inhibitor, the current standard of care.

Patients who have undergone kidney transplant are required to take medications to prevent their immune systems from rejecting their new organs. A calcineurin inhibitor (CNIs) is generally used for post kidney transplant patients, but long-term use can damage transplanted kidneys and may lead to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Belatacept acts as a “co-stimulation blocker,” inhibiting one of two signals the T cells need to trigger an immune response. And unlike the currently used CNIs, it is not toxic to the kidney. In fact, it helps preserve the function of the kidney over the long term and is more effective in suppressing antibodies against the kidney, which are important causes of organ loss.

Emory University School of Medicine Dean and kidney and pancreas transplant surgeon, Dr. Christian Larsen, played a key role in developing belatacept, together with Emory Transplant Center Executive Director and Livingston Professor of Surgery, Dr. Thomas Pearson. Belatacept was approved by the FDA in 2011 and is produced by Bristol Myers Squibb.

The study, called BENEFIT (Belatacept Evaluation of Nephroprotection and Efficacy as First-line Immunosuppression Trial), was sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb and began in 2006. FDA approval of belatacept in 2011 was partly based on the first three years of results. Results from the worldwide study, led by Dr. Larsen and University of California San Francisco kidney transplant surgeon, Dr. Flavio Vincenti, were published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The seven-year, multi-center study showed that kidney transplant recipients taking belatacept experienced a rate of mortality and graft loss significantly lower than patients taking a CNI-based regimen. The risk of death or loss of the transplanted kidney after seven years was 12.7 percent for belatacept, compared to 21.7 percent for cyclosporine A.
“While the best uses of belatacept still need additional definition, these results indicate that using belatacept as standard of care has the potential to improve long-term outcomes that matter to patients,” says Dr. Larsen.

Belatacept is given by infusion monthly at a doctor’s office, in contrast to CNIs, which are taken in daily pills at home. Many U.S. insurance companies now cover belatacept as medically necessary for kidney transplant patients.

Improving Dialysis Patients’ Lives Through Kidney Transplantation

Emory Transplant Center continues to be a leader in research by studying ways we can better bring the benefits of kidney transplantation to Georgia residents. Several Emory studies have documented that receiving a kidney transplant before dialysis, or soon after beginning treatment, can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

A recent study conducted by the Emory Transplant Center, along with two other healthcare systems in Georgia and the Southeastern Kidney Transplant Coalition, looked at why patient referral rates from dialysis centers to transplant facilities were so low. They found that three-quarters of Georgia patients on dialysis were not even being evaluated for a possible kidney transplant within their first year of dialysis.

“The study found that fewer than 28% of Georgia dialysis patients were referred to one of the state’s three adult kidney transplant centers within a year of starting dialysis,” reports Dr. Stephen Pastan, Medical Director, Emory Kidney Transplant Program, reports.

Georgia has the lowest kidney transplant rate in the country. U.S. regulations require that all dialysis centers in Georgia inform patients of kidney transplantation as a treatment option within 60 days of starting dialysis. Yet the study identified 15 Georgia dialysis facilities that referred zero patients within one year of dialysis start. The dialysis facilities with the lowest transplant referral rates were more likely to be non-profit, have more patients, and a higher patient-to-social worker ratio. Kidney transplantation is a typically less expensive intervention than ongoing dialysis and one that also promises greater longevity and a better quality of life.

One of the first key steps for many patients to receive kidney transplantation is to hear about its life-changing benefits at a dialysis center. This study illustrates the need for further measures to improve overall referral of patients to kidney transplantation.

Learn more about the Emory Kidney Transplant Program or call us at 1-855-EMORYTX (366-7989)

Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s Organ Donation and Paired Donor Exchange Live Chat

organ donation monthThank you to everyone who joined us during National Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon answered questions about organ donation, including paired donor exchange – what it is, how it works and how paired donor exchange is helping patients get a second chance at life.

Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one on the importance of organ donation and how it can have a huge impact on people’s lives.

We were thrilled with the number of people who registered and were able to participate in the chat. The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer so we have answered them below for your reference.

If you missed this informative chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers located on our chat transcript. You may also visit the Emory Transplant Center website for more information. And for more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net.

Question: My grandmother is on dialysis and she is 73. Can she be placed on the waitlist for transplant? 

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Before anyone can be placed on the wait list for organ transplantation, he/she will need to be evaluated by a transplant physician to determine if he/she meets medical criteria for transplant, e.g. is the patient healthy and strong enough for transplant. There are also criteria around patient support care as well as financial requirements. We are happy to evaluate your grandmother. To schedule an appointment for evaluation, call 1-855-EMORYTX (366-7989). It is a toll free number.

Question: Will kidney donation affect pregnancy?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: Women who donate a kidney can become pregnant after donation and deliver healthy babies. But we do recommend waiting 1 year after donation to become pregnant in order to heal from surgery and for your kidney function to be stable.

 

 

Question: What is the kidney donor waiting list exchange?

turgeon-nicoleDr. Turgeon: If a paired exchange cannot be found, living donors in certain areas of the country may be eligible for living kidney donor list exchange. In this type of exchange, a kidney donor who is not compatible with their intended recipient offers to donate to a stranger on the waiting list. In return, the intended recipient advances on the waiting list for a deceased donor kidney. This type of living donation is also referred to living donor/deceased exchange.

 

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Turgeon, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript.

If you have any questions for the doctor, do not hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

 

iCHOOSE Kidney – An Education App for Prospective Kidney Transplant Patients

iChoose Kidney AppFor patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD), there are two major treatment options: dialysis and kidney transplant. Of these two options, medical studies have shown that receiving a kidney transplant offers a better chance of survival and quality of life, eliminating the need for hours of dialysis treatment.

Although it is required by law for clinicians or physicians to discuss kidney transplant as a treatment option for their ESRD patients, Emory epidemiologist Rachel Patzer, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of surgery, says that many eligible patients are not being referred for kidney transplantation. Through her research, Patzer found that such disparities were often present in regions outside the Atlanta area.

“There are disparities in who is getting access to that information about transplant, which I think is leading to some of the disparities we see in access to getting on the waiting list and receiving a transplant,” Patzer says.

In order to address these treatment disparities and help patients understand the best treatment option for their individual cases, Patzer and the Emory transplant team created the iCHOOSE Kidney iPad application. The iCHOOSE Kidney app is a shared-decision making tool for providers or clinicians to use with their patients to inform them about potential risks and benefits of each treatment. “The app basically walks you through different risks for treatment options,” Patzer says.

While Patzer says the optimal treatment for kidney disease is transplant, she says this depends on patients’ individualized risk profile, which includes factors such as their age and other possible medical conditions they may have.

Upon a patient’s initial diagnosis of end-stage kidney disease, physicians or clinicians can enter in patient data into the iCHOOSE Kidney app, which in turn calculates the risks of dying on dialysis versus a kidney transplant. The app calculates both relative and absolute risks based on data from a national database of almost 700,000 patients.

The app tries to keep things simple for patients by presenting data in a picture format. Patzer says illustrating information visually is one of the best ways to convey risks to patients. “Showing patients you’re going to live this many years longer or that this is 10 times better is really more powerful than just giving them the average,” Patzer says.

The app is currently being used at the Emory Transplant Center and in the surrounding community. Patzer says that the Emory transplant surgeons and nephrologists use the iCHOOSE Kidney app as part of their communication and education with patients. You can find the iChoose Kidney app by searching your App Store.

Truly Thankful – Update on Veteran Police Officer and Altruistic Donor

Raleigh Callaway

Raleigh Callaway and Chris Carroll

As you may remember, it all started with a Facebook post. Raleigh Callaway received a lot of media attention when his wife posted a message on Facebook sharing Raleigh’s need for a kidney. The post resulted in thousands of people contacting the Emory Transplant Center with offers of help. But it was one man from Texas who heard his story, and gave the gift of life – a new kidney. Chris Carroll, who lives near Dallas, says he saw the Callaway family pictured on Facebook with their two children holding a sign that read, “Our Daddy Needs a Kidney.” Chris said he felt divinely led to call to see if he could become a donor.

“I’m just blessed to be able to do it,” Carroll said in one of the many TV interviews the two have conducted after their donor and transplant operations. The media coverage has spread far and wide — from the U.S. to the U.K., Australia and Japan. You can check out some of the stories at these Atlanta outlets: AJC.com, WAGA-TV, WSB-TV, and WGCL-TV.

Carroll’s and Callaway’s surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon, says they are both doing “incredibly well.” Callaway hopes to go back to his job as a police investigator in Greensboro, Ga. in a couple of months to continue to support his family. His community will be glad to have him back on the job.

As we reflect on this Thanksgiving holiday and of all that we are thankful for, let’s remember those who have given the generous donation of life through organ transplantation.

Complete Stranger Gives the Gift of Life to a Georgia Police Officer

It all started with a Facebook post…Raleigh Callaway, a veteran Georgia police officer and patient of the Emory Transplant Center, needed a kidney transplant. Desperate to find a match as he entered the late stages of renal failure, he and his family turned to social media to find a potential donor.

The Callaways’ posted a message on Facebook sharing Raleigh’s need for a kidney and a donor. The post resulted in more than 900 people contacting the Emory Transplant Center – one of whom was Chris Carroll, a health care consultant and grandfather from McKinney, Texas. He saw the post and suddenly felt compelled to give.

After going through extensive testing to see if Chris would be a match for Raleigh, the kidney transplant surgery was performed Thursday, September 25, 2014. Emory doctors said that Raleigh and donor Chris both did “incredibly well” following the operation. Chris was discharged from Emory University Hospital on Saturday, and Callaway is expected to be discharged from the hospital on Monday.

Chris was among hundreds who contacted Emory wanting to help. Dr. Nicole Turgeon, Emory transplant surgeon who performed the operation, credits the power of social media for not just saving Raleigh Callaway’s life, but potentially many more. Of the hundreds who contacted Emory, more than 125 people are still being considered for transplant surgeries to other patients. This generous act will continue to give to other patients.

Check out the video below to learn more about this incredible story!

Takeaways from Dr. Turgeon’s “Kidney Swaps and Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us during Donate Life Month for the live web chat hosted by Emory Transplant Center transplant surgeon, Dr. Nicole Turgeon. Dr. Turgeon discussed the different kinds of living organ donation, the process for living donation and even shared an inspiring video of one of her patients who had benefitted from Emory’s Paired Donor Exchange Program. Chat participants also had questions about islet cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes, which Dr. Turgeon answered with some great information on the 10th anniversary of two of our patient’s islet cell transplants and being diabetes free! Perhaps the most important message from Dr. Turgeon was one of the importance of organ donation and how it can make such a huge difference in people’s lives. For more information on how to become an organ donor, visit donatelife.net. Check out more of Dr. Turgeon’s answers by reading the chat transcript!

Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the Emory Transplant Center’s live chat:

Question: How many kidney transplants do you perform at Emory every year?

Emory Transplant Center Executive Director Elected to National Council by Peers

Dr. Thomas C. Pearson

Dr. Thomas C. Pearson

Thomas Pearson, MD, DPhil, executive director of the Emory Transplant Center, has been elected by organ donation professionals as incoming associate councillor of the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network and United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) Region 3. Each of the 11 OPTN/UNOS regions has an associate councillor who serves as the regional representative to its national Membership and Professional Standards Committee. This committee oversees transplant community membership, policy and regulatory compliance and makes recommendations to the board regarding policy violations.

“Since 1991, Tom has been a valued friend and colleague at Emory and an esteemed transplant surgeon, bench and clinical researcher,” says Christian Larsen, MD, DPhil, dean of Emory University School of Medicine, former executive director of the Emory Transplant Center and a current kidney transplant surgeon. “But he also is internationally respected as a transplant immunologist, educator and transplant advocate, establishing many protocols in place today. He is perfectly suited to this role at OPTN/UNOS Region 3.”

Pearson, who is surgical director of the kidney transplant program at Emory and the Livingston Professor of Surgery, joined the Emory faculty in 1991. Together, with long time collaborator Larsen, they played a pivotal role in developing a new class of immunosuppressive drugs to replace the cyclosporine class of drugs and their major side effects and toxicities. The FDA approved the co-stimulation blocker called belatacept in June 2011 for kidney transplant recipients. This was the first time a new class of drug had been approved for transplant since the 1990s.

After Pearson’s term as associate councillor ends in 2016, he will assume the role of councillor for an additional two-year term of service (2016-2018), representing Region 3 on the OPTN/UNOS board of directors. Pearson also serves as medical director of LifeLink of Georgia, is a member of the Board of Governors for the LifeLink Foundation and is a board member of the American Society of Transplantation.