kidney transplant program

Study Finds Patients at For-Profit Dialysis Centers are Less Likely to Receive a Kidney Transplant

kidneysA recent study published on September 10, 2019 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) finds that kidney failure patients receiving dialysis at for-profit dialysis centers are less likely to get a kidney transplant than patients at nonprofit dialysis clinics.

Emory researcher Rachel Patzer, PhD, MPH, associate professor in the departments of Surgery and Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, and senior author on the JAMA paper, wanted to determine if there were lower rates of living donor and deceased donor transplantation among for-profit dialysis facilities.

Using publicly available data from the national United States Renal Data System (USRDS), researchers looked at nearly 1.5 million kidney failure patients over 16 years. The study included review of non-profit small chains, non-profit independent facilities, for-profit large chains, for-profit small chains, and for-profit independent facilities.

Results of the Study

Researchers found that almost 12% of patients at for-profit centers were waitlisted for a kidney transplant, but that nearly 30% of nonprofit dialysis patients got on a waiting list.

“For-profit dialysis facilities have a higher profit margin when they have more patients on dialysis,” says Patzer. “In nonprofit facilities, there is not the same emphasis on profit margins. We hypothesize that this leads to fewer referrals for transplant among for-profit dialysis facilities, which may explain why there is a higher rate of waitlisting and living donor transplants among nonprofit facilities compared to for-profit dialysis facilities.”

Whether patients receive dialysis in a for-profit or non-profit dialysis facility, there is one important message the researchers want to pass along …

“Patients should advocate for themselves, and ask questions about all treatment options, including transplantation,” says Patzer. “Not all patients are candidates for transplant, but patients should make sure to have these conversations with their medical providers to understand the risks, benefits, and steps needed to pursue kidney transplantation as a treatment option.”

Kidney Transplant as a Treatment Option

A kidney transplant is another option for individuals with end-stage renal failure. This surgical procedure removes the kidneys that are no longer functioning and replaces them with one healthy kidney. Our bodies only need one healthy kidney to effectively filter waste and water from the blood.

The main advantage of a kidney transplant is quality of life: Individuals who undergo a kidney transplant are usually able to return to a normal, active lifestyle. In fact, many find themselves enjoying things they never were able to before the transplant, such as travel, exercise and more time with family and friends.

A transplant improves your kidney health and your overall health and wellness. Many find they have more energy, a stronger appetite, and are better able to manage chronic health conditions. They also no longer need dialysis.

Kidneys for transplantation come from two sources: living donors and deceased (non-living) donors. Living donation is possible because a person can live well with one healthy kidney.

About Emory Kidney Transplant Program

Emory Transplant Center performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1996 and continues to deliver comprehensive care.

In 2018, the Emory Kidney Transplant Program performed 281 adult kidney transplants and 13 simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplants. This number of surgeries placed the Emory Kidney Transplant Program among the top six centers in the nation for adult kidney transplants.

And as a top kidney transplant center in the nation, we’re at the forefront of clinical excellence and in pioneering new transplant therapies. We offer cutting-edge technology while delivering unsurpassed, comprehensive care to our patients.

Learn more about the care and innovation available through the Emory Kidney Transplant Program.

 

Choosing a Kidney Transplant Program That’s Right for You

Best in magnifying glassEmory Kidney Transplant Program Ranked Sixth in the Nation

When you’re choosing a kidney transplant program, it’s important to look at a number of different factors – from national rankings and compatibility to comfort level with the care team that will help you feel like yourself again.

The Emory Kidney Transplant Program is proud to have been ranked sixth by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), based on adult kidney transplant volume in 2018. But, to us, these rankings are about more than numbers or recognition — it’s about demonstrating our commitment to providing the most innovative and highest quality care to patients right here in Georgia.

Every day, we are committed to working closely with patients, families, donors, and providers across all medical disciplines to ensure you receive the best care possible.

Experience to Guide You to the Care You Need

Emory performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1996 and continues to deliver comprehensive care.

In 2018, our kidney transplant program performed 281 adult kidney transplants and 13 simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplants. This number of surgeries placed the Emory Kidney Transplant Program among the top six centers in the nation for adult kidney transplants.

Every surgery our surgeons perform and every individual our team sees brings a deeper understanding and knowledge of the unique medical needs of kidney and pancreas transplant patients. We bring this experience to all of our patients.

An Unwavering Focus on Quality Outcomes

Our kidney transplant program’s guiding principle is straightforward: To provide the best possible care to every patient we see, every day.

We measure our success in a number of different ways – from wait time to surgery to the number of surgeries performed. We also measure our success through patient and graft survival rates. The most recent rankings from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) underscore the experience we offer. Our risk-adjusted one-year patient and graft survival rates for kidney transplants are above the national average:

  • One-Year Patient Survival at Emory: 97.69 percent
    • One-year patient survival average nationwide: 97.68 percent
  • One-Year Graft Survival at Emory: 95.94 percent
    • One-year graft survival average nationwide: 95.81 percent

SRTR is an independent, third-party organization that evaluates and ranks organ transplant programs across the United States. It looks at many different data sets to understand the experience and quality of care transplant programs deliver to patients.

Living Donor Program Meets Patients’ Needs

Living donor programs help reduce the time spent on waiting lists by taking a small portion of a living donor’s kidney and transplanting it in individuals with kidney failure. Donors can be friends, relatives or even strangers.

Our Paired Donor Exchange Program offers even more opportunities for kidney transplant patients. In paired donation, a family member who is not a match for their loved one can donate a kidney to someone on the waiting list. In return, the donor’s loved one receives a kidney from a different donor with a compatible blood type.

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program performed 101 living donor kidney transplants in 2018 alone, ranking us as the number five paired donor program in the nation through the National Kidney Registry (NKR).

Simply put: we’re able to better meet the needs of our patients with a robust and active living donor program.

A Collaborative Approach to Care

At the heart of our approach is collaboration across all specialties at Emory and with your referring provider. Here, your care team works closely together to discuss treatment options that may be right for you — and, together, create a plan that helps you feel your best.

About Emory Kidney Transplant Program

The Emory Kidney Transplant Program ranks as one of the most prestigious transplant programs in the country. Emory’s team of specialists is highly skilled in the care of kidney transplant patients and living donors.

And as a top kidney transplant center in the nation, we’re at the forefront of clinical excellence and in pioneering new transplant therapies. We offer cutting-edge technology while delivering unsurpassed, comprehensive care to our patients.

Learn more about the care and innovation available through the Emory Kidney Transplant Program.

 

 

Friend Receives a Life Saving Surprise of a Kidney Transplant

Kidney Transplant Josiah and BritniMusic brought two friends together – Josiah Martin and Britni Ruff – and now they share an everlasting connection. Josiah was born with a genetic kidney disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which destroys the kidneys. Now at the point of end stage renal failure, Josiah was in need of a kidney transplant. In stepped Britni who would change Josiah’s life forever. Britni reached out to the Emory Transplant Center to donate her kidney, and learned she was a blood and tissue match. Emory reached out to Josiah to tell him he had a living donor, but Emory couldn’t tell him who his donor was, and neither could Britni.

“I didn’t think he would let me do it,” Britni said. “If I would have told him, he would have told me, ‘No, don’t do it. You’re too young’.”

Watch this heartfelt story of surprise unfold from FOX 5 Atlanta.

Emory Transplant Center has a well-established kidney transplant program. The Emory Kidney Transplant Program ranks no. 6 nationally for adult kidney transplant volume, performing more than 250 kidney transplants each year.

Emory Living Donor Kidney Program

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program has a well-established living donor kidney transplant program. To date, we have performed more than 1,400 living donor kidney transplants. We encourage living donation because of the excellent outcomes and the shorter wait times for patients to receive a kidney.

Emory Transplant Center also offers a paired exchange program to donor and recipient pairs who do not match. We work with the National Kidney Registry to locate matching kidneys and exchange with other recipients who have donors who do not match with them.

To learn more about kidney transplant and Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program, visit emoryhealthcare.org/kidneytransplant or call 855-366-7989.

End-Stage Renal Failure Treatment Options: Dialysis or Kidney Transplant

kidney transplantYour kidneys are small but mighty organs tasked with the job of filtering 200 quarts of blood and about two quarts of waste and water every day — all in an effort to keep your body running smoothly.

When your kidneys aren’t working as well as they should – because of a chronic disease or acute illness – waste can back up into your body. Chronic kidney disease, which affects nearly 30 million Americans, can also put you at higher risk for serious issues, including heart attack and stroke.

There are many stages and treatment options for individuals managing kidney disease – from antibiotics to treat infections, to minimally invasive options when the disease is in its early stages, to complex surgical procedures, such as kidney transplants, during end-stage renal failure. End-stage renal failure is the last stage of chronic kidney disease.

What is end-stage renal failure?

End-stage renal failure, or kidney failure, is the last stage of chronic kidney disease. It means that one or both of your kidneys no longer function on their own.

Kidney failure is generally a gradual process, one your doctor will be monitoring closely. You will be officially diagnosed with the disease when you lose about 85 – 90 percent of kidney function, and when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 15.

This can be a scary time for many patients and their families. Fortunately, today’s advances in medicine are delivering better treatments and outcomes for individuals with end-stage renal failure. The two most common treatment options are dialysis or kidney transplant.

What is dialysis?

Dialysis is a life-saving treatment process that helps the body remove waste and water from the blood. A machine does the work of your kidneys and prevents salt and water buildup, controls blood pressure, and maintains the minerals your body needs in the blood stream.

Dialysis is an on-going treatment. There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

Hemodialysis

During hemodialysis, blood is passed from the body through a set of tubes to a special filter called a dialyzer. Once the blood passes through the filter, the cleansed blood is returned to the body through another set of tubes.

Hemodialysis treatments are usually administered three times per week as an outpatient at a dialysis center. Each session can last from two to four hours.

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your stomach to filter blood. A sterile solution (dialysate) with minerals and glucose runs through a tube into the peritoneal cavity (the space between the abdominal walls).

This cleansing fluid stays in the peritoneal cavity for a few hours to absorb waste products and fluids from your body. Then, it is drained out by a tube and into a separate bag. This process is done several times throughout each day.

There are two types of peritoneal dialysis: continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Your doctor will help you to decide which approach is best. Both types of peritoneal dialysis are done at home.

Kidney transplant

A kidney transplant is another option for individuals with end-stage renal failure. This surgical procedure removes the kidneys that are no longer functioning and replaces them with one healthy kidney. (Our bodies only need one healthy kidney to effectively filter waste and water from the blood).

The main advantage of a kidney transplant is quality of life: Individuals who undergo a kidney transplant are usually able to return to a normal, active lifestyle. In fact, many find themselves enjoying things they never were able to before the transplant, such as travel, exercise and more time with family and friends.

A transplant improves your kidney health and your overall health and wellness. Many find they have more energy, a stronger appetite and are better able to manage chronic health conditions. They also no longer need dialysis.

Kidneys for transplantation come from two sources: living donors and deceased (non-living) donors. Living donation is possible because a person can live well with one healthy kidney.

What end-stage treatment option is best for me?

You, your doctor and your family should talk openly and honestly about which option is best to treat your end-stage renal failure. Your doctor can provide important information about the risks and benefits of each treatment, and how they may impact your health and condition. Your family, a social worker or a therapist can help you weigh the emotional, mental and physical toll of dialysis or transplant.

Every individual’s path to treating end-stage renal failure looks a little different. The best news is that, with today’s technology, research and on-going support, you have more options – and opportunities – to enjoy a healthy, fulfilling life.

About Emory Dialysis Center

Emory Dialysis operates three state-of-the-art dialysis clinics located across Atlanta. Patients have access to Emory’s world-renowned physicians and clinical staff, including nurses, technicians, dietitians and social workers. We offer a full range of dialysis modalities, including in-center hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and training services for home hemodialysis. To learn more, visit Emory Dialysis.

About Emory Kidney Transplant

Emory Transplant Center performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1966 and currently ranks as one of the most prestigious transplant programs in the country. Our team of specialists is highly skilled in the care of kidney transplant patients and will work with you every step of the way to ensure quality care and service. To date, Emory has performed more than 5,000 adult kidney transplants. To learn more, visit Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program.

 

Teacher Donates Kidney to Student through Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program

Kaden Koebcke

Photo source: AJC.com

Twelve-year old Kaden Koebcke was diagnosed with kidney disease at the age of two. He underwent a kidney transplant when he was 5 years old but it was unsuccessful, and the kidney had to be removed within days of the transplant. Kaden continued life on dialysis, undergoing dialysis three times a week, but his condition began to deteriorate. Last year, Kaden’s family started a Facebook page in search of a living donor. Several people volunteered to be tested, including William Wilkerson, Kaden’s 6th grade technology teacher at Grace Christian Academy in Powder Springs. William was tested at Emory Transplant Center, and was found to be a perfect match. Both donor and transplant surgeries took place on August 14th – Kaden’s at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and William’s at Emory University Hospital. Both are reported to be doing well.

Read the full story on AJC.com.

Emory Transplant Center has a well-established kidney transplant program. Emory performed Georgia’s first kidney transplant in 1966 and has performed more than 5,000 kidney transplants to date – making us a leading national program.

Emory Living Donor Kidney Program

Emory’s Kidney Transplant Program has a well-established living donor kidney transplant program. To date, we have performed more than 1,300 living donor kidney transplants. We encourage living donation because of the excellent outcomes and the shorter wait times for patients to receive a kidney.

Emory Transplant Center also offers a paired exchange program to donor and recipient pairs who do not match. We work with the National Kidney Registry to locate matching kidneys and exchange with other recipients who have donors who do not match with them.

To learn more about kidney transplant and Emory’s Living Donor Kidney Program, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/kidneytransplant or call 855-366-7989.