Posts Tagged ‘women’s health’

What is Better for My Health? Weights or Cardiovascular Exercise?

Cardio vs. WeightsFor the promotion of overall health and reduction of risk around developing diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease, the most effective fitness plan incorporates both cardiovascular training and strength training. There are different benefits to the different types of exercise, so it is ideal to plan your weekly workout routine split (2-3 days of each) between strength and cardio training.

Benefits of cardiovascular training

  • Breathing harder and deeper increases amount of oxygen in the blood
  • Heart, lungs, blood vessels work more efficiently with cardio exercises to transport oxygen through the body
  • Burns calories – one hour of running burns approximately 600 calories in a average female and 750 calories in the average male

Benefits of strength training

  • Increase muscle mass – you will be able to do activities longer after building muscle mass
  • Maintain joint flexibility
  • Increase bone density
  • Manage your weight – Note that muscle burns more calories than fat so if you have more muscle your metabolism is likely to be higher and you are likely to be slimmer.

Lack of sufficient exercise contributes to the possibility of developing conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and several types of cancer. All forms of exercise can reduce your risk of developing diseases that can be harmful to your overall health.

If you can exercise 5 – 6 days a week for over 30 minutes a day, you are ahead of the game. And if you can’t make 30 minutes a day, start small by taking the stairs at work, doing some calisthenics when you wake up in the morning, or by going for a short bike ride with your children. Work it in when you can – your body and health will thank you for it!

Related Resources:

How to Prevent Plantar Fasciitis
Understanding & Preventing Tennis Elbow
Tennis Elbow Isn’t the Only Thing that Causes Tennis Elbow
Understanding IT Band Syndrome
Understanding Runners Knee

About Dr. Mason

Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Amadeus Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

About Emory Sports Medicine

The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta, Duluth, Johns Creek and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory sports medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours. Call 404-778-7777 today.

Celebrate Women’s Health and Fitness!

National Women's Health and Fitness DayToday,  September 26, is National Women’s Health & Fitness Day, and we here at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center would like to take this opportunity to remind you of the importance of taking good care of yourself.

Since we’re bones and joint people, that’s our focus here. So consider this a simple reminder to treat your body kindly, whether you’re working or playing, exercising or just hanging out.

Here are some things to keep in mind to protect and preserve your bones and joints every day (you’ve heard these before, but it doesn’t hurt to hear them again):

  • Eat healthfully. What you put in your body affects your bone health. Not just today but down the line. (Yes, we know you know, but we had to say it anyway.)
  • Exercise regularly. Exercise helps keep your bones strong, and even moderate regular exercise can make a real difference in your physical and mental health.
  • Don’t smoke.In addition to all the bad things you already know about smoking, did you know it can cause back problems? Nicotine is toxic to spinal disc cells, and the carbon monoxide in cigarettes puts spinal discs at risk for rupture.

Most importantly, make time for you. You may be a boss, a wife, a daughter, a mother, a sister, a friend, a mentor – but you’re also an individual. Women spend so much time taking care of everyone else that their health and wellness often take a back burner. Set time aside each day to get in a little exercise and do something you want to do, whether it’s read a book, take a bubble bath, practice yoga, or just enjoy a few moments of silence. Because every day should be women’s health & fitness day.

How will you celebrate National Women’s Health & Fitness Day? What do you do every day to celebrate wellness? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

6 Ways to Stop or Reverse Bone Loss during Menopause

Prevent Bone Loss During MenopauseIf you’re a perimenopausal, menopausal, or even postmenopausal woman, this blog’s for you. You’ve probably heard that you’re likely to lose bone mass during menopause. The good news is you can take steps to help preserve and even build bone density before natures takes its toll.

Do these 6 things and you’ll enjoy stronger bones and better overall health:

  1. Eat Right. Make sure you’re eating a balanced diet that includes lots of fruits and veggies, whole grains, seeds and nuts, and lean protein. Avoid sugars, preservatives, fatty meats, and refined grains. It’s also a good idea to take a nutritional supplement formulated for bone health. In particular, make sure you’re getting enough vitamin D, which helps you absorb calcium, and vitamin K, which is essential to bone health.
  2. Strengthen Your Muscles. The best time to begin building your muscles is before you start losing bone mass. Exercise can help you regain bone as you build muscle. Even if you’ve already gone through menopause, you can still add bone mineral density with an exercise program. Non-stressful aerobic exercises, such as walking, swimming, and biking, are great, and yoga and Pilates also help to build muscles and bone density gently.
  3. Control Chronic Inflammation. Injuries, food allergies, and diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can all cause chronic inflammation, and inflammation in or around the gut can affect your ability to absorb bone-building nutrients. Sugar, caffeine, and refined carbohydrates tend to increase inflammation, while daily omega-3 fatty acids decrease inflammation. Pay attention to how the foods you eat make you feel and control inflammation for better bone health.
  4. Get Your Hormones in Balance. Hormones fluctuate during perimenopause and menopause, and the jury is still out on how those hormones affect bone loss. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may or may not be right for you—that’s for you and your doctor to decide. But you can help keep your hormones in balance with a healthy diet, and you may also find that certain herbal therapies work for you.
  5. Be Mindful of How You Lose Weight. While maintaining a healthy weight is one of the best things you can do to protect your overall health, be careful of how you go about losing if you’re overweight. Postmenopausal women who lose weight also tend to lose bone. This is where a healthy diet, supplements, and exercise come in again, to ensure you get the nutrients your body needs while you maintain and build muscle mass and bone density.
  6. Relax. Stress and worry only make bone loss worse. When you’re stressed, your body releases cortisol, the fight-or-flight hormone, and cortisol can weaken the bones and cause other problems over time. Yoga, t’ai chi, and other mind-body practices can help reduce stress while building bone and strengthening muscles. And once again, a healthy diet and exercise are key to both your mental health and your bone health.

Are you perimenopausal, menopausal, or postmenopausal? What steps have you taken to maintain or improve your health? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

Related Resources:

Why Are Women Over 50 More Likely to Suffer From Knee Pain?

Knee Pain in womenIf you have knee pain, you know how debilitating it can be. And if you’re a woman, you have an even greater chance of developing knee pain after you reach 50. In a recent “Health Minute” spot, CNN’s Elizabeth Cohen spoke with Emory orthopedic physician Dr. Ken Mautner about knee pain in women over 50.

According to Dr. Mautner, knee pain in younger women tends to come from tendonitis or irritation issues around the knee. However, as women age, earlier knee injuries may lead to arthritis. The American College of Rheumatology reports that nearly two-thirds of women ages 50 and older have some degree of knee pain, and that pain is often due to osteoarthritis. And, Dr. Mautner says, women are more at risk for arthritis than men.

“We think that estrogen may have some protective effect on the cartilage of the knee,” Dr. Mautner says. That translates to a greater chance of experiencing knee pain after menopause.

Overuse injuries can cause knee pain, as can weight. If you have knee pain, your first step is to see your primary doctor to start determining the cause. He or she may then send you to a specialist. Treatment options may be as simple as taking acetaminophen or anti-inflammatory medications or using exercise as medicine, to strengthen the stabilizing muscles around the knee. Physical therapy may also be an option. When working out, avoid high-impact exercises that can further injure the knee. Low-impact exercises, like swimming, are a good alternative.

To watch Cohen’s “Health Minute,” visit: http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/health/2012/01/26/hm-womens-knees.cnn

Are you over 50 and suffering from knee pain? Would you like to learn more about knee pain treatment at Emory? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.