Posts Tagged ‘training’

Debunk the Myths of Running

Peachtree Road RaceIf you are a runner, you have probably heard someone you know say something about running and your health like “You can die of a heart attack if you run too much” or my favorite “If you run too much, you will need your knees replaced later in life”.  Running can be a very safe and healthy sport.  There are so many advantages of running – It makes you feel better, keeps you mentally and physically in shape and can even improve your social life.   Let’s debunk the myths others may have told you so you can feel confident you are enjoying the sport you love.

Your heart and running

Consistent running reduces your risk of heart disease.

o Your increased heart rate from running for an extended period makes your heart stronger!

o Running can help lower blood pressure by helping to maintain the elasticity of your arteries.  When you run, your arteries expand and contract more than normal so this keeps the arteries elastic and your blood pressure low.  Most elite and very serious runners have very low blood pressure.

o Running can help reduce or maintain your weight.  Running burns more calories than most other exercise and it can be done relatively inexpensively.  A 150 pound man will burn over 100 calories for every mile running at moderate pace.    With a lower body weight you also have less chance of developing type II diabetes.  Type II diabetes is typically associated with obesity.

o Running often can help improve cholesterol numbers.  Bad cholesterol (LDLs) typically go down and good cholesterol (HDL) can go up.

I recommend consulting with your physician before starting to run if you are not a runner to get a full physical to ensure your heart is in tip top shape to start a running schedule.

Your bones and joints and running

Your body was built to run!  Evolution has developed our bodies so that we have the necessary tools to move and stay physically active.  To prove this, a recent study by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine revealed that long distance-runners did not have accelerated rates of osteoarthritis.  In fact, weight-bearing exercises like running can help maintain or build bone mineral density by helping you avoid osteoporosis. Therefore, experts tend to agree that running can help you fight against arthritis and other bone and joint problems.  Injuries that runners usually suffer are typically from doing too much too soon or at a quicker than natural pace for your body.  Runners will also see injuries due to wearing incorrect shoes, shoes that are too old or running with incorrect form.  Eliminate bad running habits and you will run injury free!

One myth that is true and you should take careful note of is the dangers of developing skin cancer as a runner.   The more miles you put in, the more time you are probably spending in the sun.  I recommend wearing sunscreen on every run, regardless of the time of day you run and wearing a hat and/or sunglasses.  I also recommend  running in the very early morning or in the evening instead of running when the sun is the hottest.  If you suspect any abnormal lesion or marking, see your dermatologist right away!
So get out there and run!  You will be happy you did!

Upcoming Live Chat with Emory Sports Medicine Specialist

UPDATE: CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Are you training for the AJC Peachtree Road Race or another running race this summer or fall? If so, join Emory Sports Medicine physician, Dr. Amadeus Mason for a live online web chat on Tuesday, May 14 to learn how to run injury free.  Dr. Mason will be available to answer questions on training, stretching, how to prevent common running injuries and treating injuries when they occur.

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!

Related Resources

About Dr. Brandon Mines

Brandon Mines, MDBrandon Mines, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics. Dr. Mines started practicing at Emory in 2005 after completing his Sports Medicine Fellowship at University of California – Los Angeles. Dr. Mines is board certified in both family practice and sports medicine. He has focused his clinical interest on sports injuries and conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, knee, foot and ankle. He is head team physician for the Women’s National Basketball Association’s (WNBA) Atlanta Dream and Decatur High School. He is also one of the team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons.  His areas of interest are diagnosis and non-operative management of acute sports injuries, basketball injuries, tennis injuries, golf injuries and joint injections.

Takeaways from Running Injury Live Chat

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Tuesday, Dr. Amadeus Mason of Emory Sports Medicine, held a live chat that answered your questions about preventing running injuries. Dr. Mason provided some great answers to some very interesting questions; from how to prevent running injuries to the ideal length of time one should consider when training for a 5k and other long distance races.  Dr. Mason also provided participants with resources on things like: knee pain and strengthening and IT Band Syndrome.

The following is a recap of the live chat, or you can check out the transcript from Dr. Mason’s Preventing Running Injuries chat.

Q. Is it better to stretch before a run? After a run? Or Both?

A. For runners stretching for flexibility, it’s better to stretch after their run, because muscles are looser and more receptive to the stretch at that time. Dr. Mason also noted that while stretching before a run doesn’t hurt, runners should keep in mind that it’s best to spend at least ¼ of the time you spend running on stretching. As an example, Dr. Mason suggests if a runner trains for an hour, it’s best to stretch for at least 15 minutes.

Q. How does a runner prevent shin splints from reoccurring and preventing the pain’s longevity?

A. Runners experiencing recurrent shin splints, or moderate to severe pain in the shin that lasts for a long period of time, should see a specialist. Make sure not to train too much, too quickly, that’s one of the most common causes of shin splints, according to Dr. Mason. If shin splints occur, it’s recommended that a runner modifies their training regimen to accommodate for pain relief. Females, who experience shin splints on a fairly regular or recurrent basis, should contact their Physician.  Continuous shin pain is a possible indication that there’s some sort of hormonal imbalance or insufficient caloric intake from a female runner’s diet.

For more information on preventing running injuries, check out Dr. Mason’s chat transcript. You can also download the resources he shared in the chat by using the links below.

Related Resources

Not Just on the Sidelines: Emory Sports Medicine Doctors Work with the Atlanta Falcons On & Off the Field

Dr. Spero Karas Atlanta Falcons Team Doctor

Source: Atlanta Falcons Website

The Atlanta Falcons recently contracted Emory Sports Medicine physicians to help manage the team’s sports medicine needs. I am honored to now serve as the Falcons’ head team physician; my colleague, Dr. Jeff Webb, is the assistant team physician. Now that football season is finally upon us, we’re staying busy!

We’re excited to be bringing expert care to the Falcons in a three-prong approach that includes:

  • Athletic performance improvement – strength training and conditioning, biomechanical corrections, and injury prevention through corrective exercises and through training that improves flexibility, flexibility, posture, gait, and overall core strength and strength and balance.
  • Athletic training – the care and prevention of injuries through treatment, taping and orthotics, bracing, heat, ultrasound, muscle stimulation and similar methods.
  • Sports medicine – surgical and medical care of injuries and illnesses

As head team physician, I direct the sports medicine prong, working closely with Dr. Webb and drawing on all the resources of Emory Sports Medicine and Emory Healthcare so that, whatever the problem, I can rely on the finest specialists in the field. The Falcons play really hard and end up with many interesting injuries and illnesses. It’s my job to make sure that the Falcons are wrapped in a complete blanket of world-class care. Emory Sports Medicine offers comprehensive services and renowned experts who can cater to the needs of each player and his specific injury.

As you can see, our work will extend far beyond the sidelines of the games, but Dr. Webb and I will also be there on the sidelines for every game, assessing injuries, and providing care.

I’m really looking forward to being at the games with the Falcons, though it does require me to separate the football fan in me from the physician, taking a more analytic approach to the game. When the Falcons score a touchdown, I’ll be focused not on the elation of the moment or the guy who brought it into the end zone, but on all eleven guys who just contributed to that score. I’ll make sure they’re properly hydrated and that there are no issues arising from their ongoing injuries. I have to be more aware of the medical situation rather than getting too caught up in the excitement of the game.

I’m very proud to be the Falcons’ head team physician, but ultimately my job is to provide the best, most competent care in order to insure the health and safety of each athlete. I’ll save my own celebrating for later, when the job is done.

See how Dr. Karas and the team at Emory Sports Medicine is working with the Atlanta Falcons in this short video, “Meeting the New Team Physician,” on the Atlanta Falcons website.

About Dr. Spero Karas

Dr. Karas is the Director of the Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program and an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University. His specialties include sports medicine, surgery of the shoulder and knee, and arthroscopic surgery. He is Board Certified in Orthopaedic Surgery, with a subspecialty certification in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. He currently serves as team physician for the Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech Baseball and Lakeside High School, as well as a consulting team physician for Emory University, Ogelthorpe University, Perimeter College, Oglethorpe University, Perimeter College, and Georgia Tech athletics. He cares for patients and athletes of all levels: professional, collegiate, scholastic, and recreational.

 

More Runners’ Chat Questions Answered

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Wednesday, I held a live chat on the topic of running to help those preparing for the Peachtree Road Race and to educate runners of all skill levels on injury prevention, nutrition, and technique. It was my first so-called “live chat,” so I really didn’t know what to expect. The questions that I received in yesterday’s chat were fantastic. Not only do I feel like I got to help the 50+ people who joined me in the chatroom, but I myself was able to learn something in the process. Typically when I chat with people who have questions for me, they are my patients, in a one-on-one setting. This really gives me the time to feel them out and learn about them as individuals. Wednesday, I was charged with a new and equally inspiring and fulfilling task– to educate a group, without being able to see them in person or learn about them before we talked. It was an extremely eye opening experience.

I want to thank those who joined me Wednesday for a wonderful chat. It was so successful, in fact, that I didn’t get a chance to answer each and every question. For those who were in the room, I promised to follow up with a blog to answer all questions that were unaddressed, and I have done so below. At the bottom of this blog post, you will also find the documents I mentioned in the chat for your further reference. As an added bonus, to make sure everyone gets a chance to discuss the topic of running and all of its facets with me, we will be holding the next live chat on running on June 15th. PART II CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Larry: I ran a marathon with IT band issues.  What can I do to prevent it in the future?
Dr. Mason: Larry, to prevent IT band problems, you should strive to work on increased flexibility. I’d advise that you watch the rate at which you increase your mileage/distance and start training early enough to allow for a slow and steady progress with sufficient recovery times between training sessions.

Shirley: Dr. Mason, Why does my back hurt periodically when I am tired while running?  Should I bend over to stretch?  I am a beginner.
Dr. Mason: I can’t speak to your specific medical circumstances without seeing you in-person, but generally speaking, oftentimes people experience back pain while running due to hamstring tightness. For these patients, I advise that they avoid the typical stretch that involves bending over, and instead focus on extension type exercises.

M. White: How do I know when it is time for new running shoes?  This will be my first time running longer than a 5k.
Dr. Mason: My recommended guidelines for footwear are if you run more than 20 – 25 miles a week you should change you shoes every 3 – 4months ( ~300 miles); if you run less than 20 miles a week can change shoes twice a year.

Sylvia: Hi. Dr. Mason. Is there any particular type of shoe that you would recommend as best for protecting against injuries; Knees, ankles, shin splints, etc.?
Dr. Mason: Studies have shown that shoe comfort is a more important factor in preventing injury than the actual type of shoe.  I would recommend you get evaluated at your local running store to determine what class of running should would be best for you. After doing that, go ahead and pick the most comfortable one in that class.

Judy: I’m used to walking about 3 miles about 3 times a week.  I am signed for the Peachtree.  Obviously I will be walking it.  I have 6 weeks to step up my training.  How would you suggest I proceed to get to 6 miles in time for the race?  Thanks.
Dr. Mason: Good question, Judy. I’d recommend adding about ½ mile to your distance each week.

Steve: Dr. Mason, I have a chronic hamstring issue.  What can I do to help the issue?  What type of Dr. or therapist should I seek out for help?
Dr. Mason: I would recommend you see a physician with sports medicine training.

M. White: I have been training for a 5k (took 30min) – which I ran a couple of weekends ago.  To train for the Peachtree what should I do?  Increase distance or time?
Dr. Mason: My answer here depends on whether you want to run the Peachtree for time or just for fun.  Since this race is twice the distance of a 5k,  I would start out increasing your distance (1/2 mile a week. Once you get to 5 miles then you can start increasing your pace.

Mac: What are some good lower-fat proteins for vegetarian novice runners?
Dr. Mason: As a vegetarian you should be concerned about getting in GOOD fats as opposed to LOW fat.  To that end eating things like beans, nuts and/or soy would be good choices.

Dawn: When I ran the Peachtree last year, I found it difficult to actually drink water at the hydration stations (did more of a swish-and-spit).  I am concerned about dehydration during the race.  Should I increase my fluids before the race?
Dr. Mason: Yes, in a 10K there is LESS risk/concern for dehydration that in half or full marathons, but you should be starting your hydration process now.  I recommend increasing you fluid intake (electrolyte/water) weeks before you run and incorporating “water stops” in to your training.  You know you are well hydrated when you have to use the bathroom 30 min after fluid intake (when you’re not running).

1st Timer: Are there any weight training exercises you recommend?
Dr. Mason: In order to answer this question in detail, I would need more information from you.  What I can say is that weight /strength training should be a part of any running program. This type of training should primarily (but not solely) focus on lower body strength and be accompanied by a good flexibility program.

Jacqui: How frequently should you increase pace or distance?
Dr. Mason: I normally recommend increasing distance then pace. But, as we mentioned in the chat, it really depends on the goals you’re looking to achieve. If you are looking to run a long distance race, you’ll probably want to focus on increasing distance, more often than pace, and doing so every 2 weeks should work well. Just remember to never increase both distance and pace at the same time.

Shalewa: What about energy enhancers like sports beans or 5 hour energy drink?  Are those bad for you?
Dr. Mason: Most “energy enhancers” are just caffeine or a caffeine derivatives and I would stay away from them as they greatly increase dehydration risk.  Good nutrition that balance carbohydrates, proteins and good fats should give you the energy you need for a 10K.  With marathons, ultra marathons, and triathlons in-competition metabolic supplements (which are very different from the energy enhancers) are often provided and can be helpful.  You’ll want to be careful and make sure that you are using them throughout your training so your body has time to adjust.

Jennifer: Hi, Dr. Mason.  I am an active person who is new to running.  After my training runs I am experiencing some discomfort/tightness in my upper and outer knees.  What can I do to help prevent this?
Dr. Mason: If these symptoms are not preventing you from doing the type/intensity of run that you want, then I would recommend working on the flexibility and strength of you quads and hamstrings.  If you are having to modify your training runs then you should see a Sports Medicine Physician.

Thanks again to those who joined me in Wednesday’s chat. I hope to see you all in Part II on June 15th! Below are the documents I referenced in the chat, please feel free to download them and keep them for reference. If you missed Part I of the chat, you can check out the chat transcript. You can also sign up to attend Part II of the chat, which is taking place on June 15th at 12pm.

Related PDF Downloads: