Posts Tagged ‘student athlete injury prevention’

Student Athletes Must Undergo a Pre–Participation Sports Physical

Student Athletes helped by Emory Orthopedic Doctors

After months of being dormant during the winter, student athletes are anxious to get back in the game. While increased exercise and participation in sports outweigh the risk of injury or illness, it is crucial that every child undergo a pre–participation sports physical before beginning practice.

In the U.S., a pre–participation exam (PPE) is required for student athletes who want to take part in sports and/or sports camps.

Pre-Participation Exam Benefits

 

  • Identifies potential life-threatening conditions, such as risk of sudden cardiac death
  • Evaluates existing conditions that may need further treatment or monitoring
  • Diagnosis orthopedic conditions that may need physical therapy or other treatments
  • Identifies student athletes at high risk for violence, substance abuse, depression, eating disorders, anemia, asthma, hypertension, and more
  • Reviews history of head injuries or concussion to establish neuropsychological status

Pre-participation Exam Timing

 
PPEs usually occur six weeks before the start of a sport or camp. Most student athletes are cleared for full participation following a sports physical exam. However, more time may be needed for those who require follow-up care to be cleared from potential complications.

This year, Emory Sports Medicine Center physicians and therapists will again conduct pre-participation exams at several of the more than 20 school’s athletic programs that are supported by Emory Healthcare. Those include Berkmar, Decatur, Johns Creek, Atlanta Girls’, Blessed Trinity and Northview high schools, as well as Pace Academy.

Pre-participation Exam Components

 
Medical History Review

Parents and student athletes should come prepared to discuss the student’s complete medical history. This can help the doctor identify conditions or ailments that may affect the student’s ability to effectively take part in their sport or activity.

Physical Exam

Many schools, family physicians or pediatricians can perform physical exams, but if you would like a more thorough exam, Emory’s team of sports medicine specialists would appreciate the opportunity to evaluate you or your loved one.

Emory Healthcare has a dedicated Orthopaedics and Spine Center, with locations throughout metro Atlanta. To make an appointment, please call 404-778-3350. Interested to learn more now? Yes, I want to learn more now.

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By Dr. Jeff Webb

Jeffrey Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta Braves. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

 

Injuries in the Young Athlete – How much is too much?

Student Athletes Injury PreventionChildren should be encouraged to participate in sports at a young age. Sports can teach children so many life lessons and helps children build their confidence. However, many parents are starting kids in sports at a young age in the hopes of developing their child into a scholarship athelte or a professional athlete. If a young athlete shows promise, many parents encourage their child to specialize in a specific sport and train year round from as young as 6 or 7 years old. This could be harmful because children’s bodies are still growing and developing. Young athletes are more prone to overuse injuries. It is estimated that close to half of the injuries in young athletes are related to overuse/overtraining. In addition to injuries, young athletes are also susceptible to overtraining syndrome and psychologic stress. Female athletes are particularly at risk for stress fractures and even delayed puberty.

With the exception of baseball pitch count research (which has studied how many pitches a young athlete could handle before injury), there is not conclusive research that indicates exactly how much is too much training for a young athlete. The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness recommends that young athletes should limit their sports specific activities to five days a week with one complete rest day from all physical activity. In addition, the same council recommends young student athletes take at least 2 months off a year from a specific sport to properly rest and rebuild their bodies. Young athletes should avoid playing on two teams in the same season.

Cross-training is good for the body. Our bodies are not designed to do the same thing over and over again, especially as youth and adolescents. It is also beneficial to play more than one sport. It allows athletes to develop more skills, be involved with a different group of teammates and coaches, and keeps them interested. It is also important to properly train the body in the preseason. In preparing for a season or a race it is important to increase training time/mileage by no more than 10% per week.

Sports are an excellent activity for young children and can help them develop life lessons they will use forever. Parents should be encouraged to pay attention to the child and allow them to rest and relax and take time away from their sport to rebuild and rejuvenate. Pay attention to a child who complains of muscle and joint pains, fatigue, or shows signs of psychologic stress. Athletics are a great way for youth to stay healthy and build a strong character, but remember that the number one reason that young people give for playing sports is “to have fun.”

About Jeff Webb, MD
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools and other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

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