Posts Tagged ‘sports medicine atlanta’

Knee Injuries in Young Athletes Live Chat- September 28th

knee-injury-emailKnee injuries in young athletes continues to be on the rise. One of the most common sports injuries, an ACL tear, could end a young athlete’s career aspirations in sports before it even begins. Twist your knee sharply or extend it beyond its normal range during play, and you may hear the telltale “pop.” Whether your child participates in football, soccer, basketball or track, their drive for the game may be setting the stage for a serious injury.

Join us on Wednesday, Sept. 28 from noon – 1p.m. EST for an online live chat with Dr. John Xerogeanes, Chief of Sports Medicine at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and head team physician for Georgia Tech. Dr. X (as he’s known in the community) will take questions regarding how to reduce the risk of injury, specific exercises for strengthening the knee, warning signs, what to do following an ACL injury, and the rehabilitation process. Sign up for this live chat below.

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About Dr. John Xerogeanes

xerogeanes-john-wDr. Xerogeanes is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Known as Dr. “X” by his staff and patients, he is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University as well as an Adjunct Professor at Georgia State and Mercer University. Dr. X is Head Orthopaedist and Team Physician for Georgia Tech, Emory University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA. He specializes in ACL and ACL revision surgery performing over 200 of these operations each year. He is board certified in orthopaedic surgery and has his sub-specialty certification in orthopaedic sports medicine.

Emory Sports Medicine Doctors- We’ve Got Your Back Video

Emory Healthcare has begun airing a new television commercial featuring Emory Sports Medicine Center. The TV spot is set appear on a number of stations in the Atlanta area, including CBS 46 as part of its SEC Football coverage running through December, as well as Georgia PBA 30 and FOX Sports Southeast during Atlanta Hawks game coverage.

Be sure to watch the commercial on Emory Healthcare’s YouTube, Facebook or Twitter accounts, share it with friends, and discover more about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Emory Sports Medicine Center and its sports medicine doctors provide comprehensive care for athletes and active people of all ages and abilities. The Center’s physicians and athletic training teams are immersed in the world of sports medicine and hold alliances with area high school teams and youth leagues, as well as college and professional teams, including the Atlanta Hawks, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Learn more about our sports medicine specialists and take a closer look at Emory Sports Medicine Center here.

Keys to Preventing Soccer Injuries

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Dr. Oludade recently returned from a trip to Turkey, where he provided medical care for the United State’s U-17 Men’s National Soccer Team during the 2016 Mercedes Benz Aegean Cup. Dr. Olufade with head coach, John Hackworth.

Already the most popular international team sport, soccer is also the fastest growing team sport in the United States. With more people playing soccer, it is not surprising that the number of soccer-related injuries is increasing. Although soccer provides an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise and helps develop balance, agility, coordination, and a sense of teamwork, soccer players must be aware of the risks for injury. Injury prevention, early detection, and treatment can keep kids and adults on the field long-term.

The most common injuries in soccer that impact healing time are ankle/knee ligament injuries and muscle strains to the hamstrings and groin. These injuries may be traumatic, such as a kick to the leg or a twist to the knee, or result from overuse of muscles of tendons. Cartilage tears and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprains in the knee are some of the more serious injuries that may require surgery.

Proper preparation is essential for preventing injuries from playing soccer.  Here are some tips:

  • Warm up and stretch. Always take time to warm up and stretch. In order to increase your flexibility and decrease the likelihood of injury, there are number of stretching methods you can use:
    • Dynamic soccer stretching – Often used at the beginning of a warm up. Making circles with the arms to loosen the shoulders, twisting from side to side and swing each leg as if kicking a ball are examples of dynamic stretching.
    • Static soccer stretching – Muscles are stretched without moving the limb or joint itself. A good example of a static stretch is the traditional quad stretch – standing on one leg, you grab your ankle and pull your heel into your backside.
  • Maintain fitness. Be sure you are in good physical condition at the start of soccer season. During the off-season, stick to a balanced fitness program that incorporates aerobic exercise, strength training, and flexibility.
  • Hydrate. It’s important to make sure you get the right amount of water before, during, and after exercise. Water regulates your body temperature and lubricates your joints. If you have not had enough fluids, your body will not be able to effectively cool itself through sweat and evaporation. You may experience fatigue, muscle cramps, dizziness and more serious symptoms, all of which can increase the likelihood of injury.
  • Ensure Proper Equipment. Wear shin guards to help protect your lower legs, as leg injuries are often caused by inadequate shin guards. You should wear the proper cleats depending on conditions, such as wearing screw in cleats on a wet field with high grass.
  • Prevent Overuse. Limit your amount of playing time. Adolescents should not play just one sport year round — taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development and injury prevention.
  • Cool down and stretch. Stretching at the end of practice is too often neglected because of busy schedules. Stretching can help reduce muscle soreness and keep muscles long and flexible. Be sure to stretch after each training practice to reduce your risk for injury.

At Emory Sports Medicine Center, our team of specialists is constantly conducting research and developing new techniques for diagnosing and treating the full range of sports-related injuries. Whether you are a professional athlete, or simply enjoy an active lifestyle, Emory provides comprehensive care, in a patient–family- centered environment, so together we achieve the best possible outcome and you can return to the sport you love. To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-3350 or complete our online appointment request form.

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About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunOluseun Olufade, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

Takeaways from the Sports Cardiology: Heart Health & Being Active Live Chat

sports-cardio-emailThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, January 26, for our live online chat on “Sports Cardiology: Heart Healthy & Being Active” hosted by Emory sports cardiologist, Jonathan H. Kim, MD, and sports medicine physician, Neeru Jayanthi, MD.

We were thrilled with the number of people who registered and were able to participate in the chat. The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer so we have answered them below for your reference.

Question: How much exercise is safe if I have been diagnosed with a heart condition?

  • Answer from Dr. Kim: Discussing the appropriate “exercise prescription” for patients with heart conditions is one of the key elements of sports cardiology. Each “prescription” is patient specific and accounts for key elements in the patient’s history, cardiac condition, and results of cardiac testing. It is important to emphasize that, one, cardiac testing obtained is unique to each patient and their condition. Most testing will include, however, an EKG, imaging of the heart (echocardiogram), and functional exercise testing. Two, the “prescription” also takes into account the sports cardiologist and patient’s discussion weighing the risks vs. benefits of ongoing exercise and other key personal psychological aspects individual to each athletic patient. Thus, this is a very individualized discussion per athlete and per condition.

Question: Are energy drinks before you workout bad for your heart?

  • Answer from Dr. Kim: In general, high-energy drinks with caffeine carry the potential side effects related to caffeine. Many of these side effects are cardiovascular in nature (blood pressure and heart rhythm effects). In my practice, I generally discourage long-term use/ingestion of these high-energy beverages with caffeine if possible.

One of the questions from the live chat was too good not to share. See below:

Question: My 10 year old son wants to start playing football, but I’m concerned about the stories I see on the news about kids dropping dead on the field. His father’s family has a long history of heart disease. Does he need a heart screening before I let him play? Can his pediatrician screen him or should I bring him to a cardiologist/sports cardiologist?

  • Answer from Dr. Jayanthi: While it is devastating to hear these stories of sudden cardiac death during sports in children, fortunately these are exceedingly rare. It is very important to have an established relationship with your pediatrician or family physician to identify any risk factors prior to sports participation. If there are few risk factors and the appropriate heart screening questions and physical exam are done, there may not be any further need for evaluation.

However, if there are certain conditions in the family history, they may require referral to sports cardiology, such as sudden cardiac death and other conditions. We still do not have universal recommendations about getting EKG or echocardiograms prior to participation.

  • Answer from Dr. Kim: I agree with Dr. Jayanthi’s comments. In addition, it is critical to emphasize that many of the heart conditions that cause sudden cardiac death evolve unpredictably as we age. Therefore screening with heart tests in a 10 year old may not demonstrate evidence of a heart problem; however, that same 10 year old may actually have the genes for one of these heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death. Therefore, as mentioned, the most important thing is to simply review family history questions, do an appropriate physical exam, and make sure there are no concerning clinical symptoms present in a young athlete screened prior to sports competition. The guidelines definitely recommend that any young athlete, regardless of age, should be screened by a physician with a detailed history and physical, only.

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. You can also visit Emory Sports Cardiology and Emory Sports Medicine Center for more information.

Also, if you have additional questions for Dr. Kim or Dr. Jayanthi, please feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

Introducing Emory’s New Tennis Medicine Program

tennis-250x250Tennis is a great exercise. It improves aerobic fitness, lowers body fat, improves cholesterol levels, reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves bone health. And while tennis can be both healthy and fun, there is an inherent injury risk for those who play tennis, particularly for those who specialize in the sport. Given the impact of potential injuries specific to the sport, having a physician and community that understand the sport and its risks are vital.

We’re thrilled to announce that we’ve implemented a one-of-a-kind Tennis Medicine program offered by the Emory Sports Medicine Center which promotes health through tennis and provides specialized treatment for a wide range of tennis-related injuries. Our goal is to get patients back on the court as soon as possible, and teach them the techniques that will reduce their risk of further injuries and maintain their performance.

What Sets Us Apart?

Treating physicians, who are not able to incorporate more comprehensive evaluations, may be limited to standard medical treatments for tennis players. Our unique program will address tennis players’ needs by evaluating and treating injuries with a tennis-specific approach, including any needed rehabilitation, training modifications, injection procedures or surgery. We’ve also built three extraordinary components into our program:

  • On-court tennis evaluations
  • Ongoing communication with the tennis teaching professional/coach and tennis specific providers in rehabilitation, nutrition, sports psychology, and performance.
  • Continuing education to ensure tennis specific treatment plans

By being on the court to evaluate players’ strokes, we are able to work with coaches to plan tennis treatment programs that help athletes get back on the court more quickly and avoid additional injury through the years.

Our physicians and staff look for the root cause of every injury – such as mechanics, volume of play, equipment, inflexibility or strength deficits – and then provide proper medical treatment, recommendations regarding ideal training, and when appropriate, suggestions for tennis-specific stroke modifications. This combination helps tennis athletes play safely through injury and remain healthy on the court.

To receive treatment through this incredibly unique program for tennis-specific injuries, call us today at 404-778-1831 to make an appointment. We’ll get you back on the court in no time!

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About Dr. Jayanthi

jayanthi-neeru-aNeeru Jayanthi, MD, is considered one of the country’s leading experts in youth sports health, injuries and sports training patterns, as well as an international leader in tennis medicine. He is currently the President of the International Society for Tennis Medicine and Science (STMS) and a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional. He previously was the medical director of primary care sports medicine at Loyola University Chicago prior to being recruited to Emory, where he will lead an innovative tennis medicine program.

Dr. Jayanthi’s practice is open to all children and adults with non-surgical issues related to activity and sports. He particularly loves working with young athletes of all sports, and tennis players of all ages.

Sports Cardiology: Heart Healthy & Being Active Live Chat on January 26th

sports-cardio-cilAsk the experts! Talk to the physicians who are the medical providers for the Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta Dream, Georgia Tech athletes and more!

When you’re an athlete, professional, amateur or weekend warrior, you have unique health needs. Optimal health is vital to your performance and in some cases, your ability to participate at all. Even with the best training and care, the body doesn’t always cooperate. That’s where we come in.

Emory Healthcare is the first and only health system in Atlanta to launch a Sports Cardiology practice. Collaborating with the Emory Sports Medicine Center, the program not only focuses on diagnosing and treating cardiovascular disease, but also preventing future issues.

The unique partnership between Emory Sports Medicine Center and Emory Cardiology means our physicians work together to diagnose your condition and deliver a proper treatment plan so you return to the activity you love, safely. This level of collaborative care is not available in programs that focus on cardiovascular health or sports medicine exclusively.

We encourage athletes and exercising individuals, and their families, of all ages and levels to join us for a live chat on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST hosted by Emory sports cardiologist, Jonathan H. Kim, MD, and sports medicine physician, Neeru Jayanthi, MD. Don’t miss your chance to get your general sports and sports cardiology related questions answered by the same physicians who treat the Atlanta Falcons, Hawks, Dream, Georgia Tech and other professional and recreational athletic organizations across metro Atlanta. Register below.

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Emory Sports Medicine & Physical Therapy Partner with the Atlanta Ballet

Atlanta Ballet Emory Physical Therapy Partnership

Photo by Kim Kenney, Atlanta Ballet

We are very pleased to announce that Emory Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy is now the official medical provider for the Atlanta Ballet. We provide physical therapy, massage therapy, screenings, injury prevention and physician coverage for injuries for the Atlanta Ballet athletes. Marcia Toye – Vego with Emory Physical Therapy is the primary physical therapist working with the Atlanta Ballet and has been working with these talented athletes since 1995. Dr. Sam Labib with Emory Sports Medicine is one of the physicians that regularly treats the ballet performers when they need to see a doctor.

You can learn more about the partnership by reading the full article on the Emory News Center website.