Posts Tagged ‘sports injuries’

Knee Injuries in Young Athletes Live Chat- September 28th

knee-injury-emailKnee injuries in young athletes continues to be on the rise. One of the most common sports injuries, an ACL tear, could end a young athlete’s career aspirations in sports before it even begins. Twist your knee sharply or extend it beyond its normal range during play, and you may hear the telltale “pop.” Whether your child participates in football, soccer, basketball or track, their drive for the game may be setting the stage for a serious injury.

Join us on Wednesday, Sept. 28 from noon – 1p.m. EST for an online live chat with Dr. John Xerogeanes, Chief of Sports Medicine at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and head team physician for Georgia Tech. Dr. X (as he’s known in the community) will take questions regarding how to reduce the risk of injury, specific exercises for strengthening the knee, warning signs, what to do following an ACL injury, and the rehabilitation process. Sign up for this live chat below.

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About Dr. John Xerogeanes

xerogeanes-john-wDr. Xerogeanes is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Known as Dr. “X” by his staff and patients, he is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University as well as an Adjunct Professor at Georgia State and Mercer University. Dr. X is Head Orthopaedist and Team Physician for Georgia Tech, Emory University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA. He specializes in ACL and ACL revision surgery performing over 200 of these operations each year. He is board certified in orthopaedic surgery and has his sub-specialty certification in orthopaedic sports medicine.

Emory Sports Medicine Doctors- We’ve Got Your Back Video

Emory Healthcare has begun airing a new television commercial featuring Emory Sports Medicine Center. The TV spot is set appear on a number of stations in the Atlanta area, including CBS 46 as part of its SEC Football coverage running through December, as well as Georgia PBA 30 and FOX Sports Southeast during Atlanta Hawks game coverage.

Be sure to watch the commercial on Emory Healthcare’s YouTube, Facebook or Twitter accounts, share it with friends, and discover more about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Emory Sports Medicine Center and its sports medicine doctors provide comprehensive care for athletes and active people of all ages and abilities. The Center’s physicians and athletic training teams are immersed in the world of sports medicine and hold alliances with area high school teams and youth leagues, as well as college and professional teams, including the Atlanta Hawks, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Learn more about our sports medicine specialists and take a closer look at Emory Sports Medicine Center here.

Emory Sports Medicine Physician Lands in Rio to Support Olympic Team

rio-squareWhen the 2016 Olympic Games kick off Friday, viewers will tune in to see the world’s best of the best athletes walking into Rio’s Maracana Stadium during the opening ceremony.

Among those making their way into the stadium will be Emory Healthcare sports medicine physician R. Amadeus Mason, M.D., who is helping support Team USA Track and Field.

Dr. Mason was busy this year treating four Olympic hopefuls at Emory Sports Medicine Center. Each one had pounding, over-use type injuries in either the knees, Achilles or shin. He treated them with various non-surgical measures such as biologic injections of platelets or stem cells.

“It’s exciting that these are the types of patients we see at Emory Sports Medicine on a daily basis,” he said, “and that’s the level of care anyone can expect in terms of treatment from the doctors here.”

Emory Sport Medicine Center treats people of all levels, whether they are regularly active, a weekend warrior or even a pro.

One of Dr. Mason’s patients is 400-meter hurdler, Ajoke Odumosu, a two-time Olympian from Nigeria. Ms. Odumosu, who goes by “AJ,” and now lives in Alabama, said she has complete faith in Dr. Mason for one simple reason: He’s earned it.

“I first was seen by him in 2009 after the world championships and got some guidance on managing my body,” she said. “He knows the body of the athlete. He’s always steered me in the right direction and he puts my mind at ease as well.”

For AJ, Dr. Mason helps her know how hard she can train without damage to her knees.

“I have cartilage damage in my right knee and some swelling in my left knee,” she said. “I have to be able to train not only in speed, but strength, which is pounding on the knees, with long endurance runs. I have to trust that my knees will be OK, but also be realistic and listen to my body. Some days I can train hard and feel like Superwoman; some days I have to take it easier.”

While AJ won’t be joining the team in Rio for this Olympics, she praised the treatments and guidance she sought from Dr. Mason at Emory Sports Medicine.

“I trust him very, very much,” she said. “He gives me confidence that my knees aren’t going to go out on me on a jump.”

Concussions in Young Athletes – Live Chat on August 9, 2016

concussion260x200Is the peewee football phase too early to wonder about concussions? Maybe not. Concussion rates are rising sharply among U.S. kids and teens, researchers report, and concussion diagnoses more than doubled between 2007 and 2014. According to the CDC, more than 248,000 U.S. children and teens land in the emergency room each year because of a concussion sustained in sports or recreational activities, such as bicycling, football, basketball, soccer and from playground injuries.

If you have a young child or a student athlete who is participating in sports and want to learn more about how to prevent, detect and treat concussions, join us on Tuesday, August 9 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. for a live online chat to discuss the topic. Our host is Dr. Jeffrey Webb, pediatric sports medicine physician at Emory Sports Medicine Center. Dr. Webb will also discuss the laws that Georgia has passed targeting concussion in high school and younger athletes.

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About Dr. Webb

webb-jeffreyDr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. During his training and practice he has provided medical coverage for division I college football and other sports, multiple high schools, ballet, the Rockettes, marathons, international track and field events, and the Special Olympics. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons and is also a consulting physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College and many other club sports teams.

He is active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Keys to Preventing Soccer Injuries

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Dr. Oludade recently returned from a trip to Turkey, where he provided medical care for the United State’s U-17 Men’s National Soccer Team during the 2016 Mercedes Benz Aegean Cup. Dr. Olufade with head coach, John Hackworth.

Already the most popular international team sport, soccer is also the fastest growing team sport in the United States. With more people playing soccer, it is not surprising that the number of soccer-related injuries is increasing. Although soccer provides an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise and helps develop balance, agility, coordination, and a sense of teamwork, soccer players must be aware of the risks for injury. Injury prevention, early detection, and treatment can keep kids and adults on the field long-term.

The most common injuries in soccer that impact healing time are ankle/knee ligament injuries and muscle strains to the hamstrings and groin. These injuries may be traumatic, such as a kick to the leg or a twist to the knee, or result from overuse of muscles of tendons. Cartilage tears and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprains in the knee are some of the more serious injuries that may require surgery.

Proper preparation is essential for preventing injuries from playing soccer.  Here are some tips:

  • Warm up and stretch. Always take time to warm up and stretch. In order to increase your flexibility and decrease the likelihood of injury, there are number of stretching methods you can use:
    • Dynamic soccer stretching – Often used at the beginning of a warm up. Making circles with the arms to loosen the shoulders, twisting from side to side and swing each leg as if kicking a ball are examples of dynamic stretching.
    • Static soccer stretching – Muscles are stretched without moving the limb or joint itself. A good example of a static stretch is the traditional quad stretch – standing on one leg, you grab your ankle and pull your heel into your backside.
  • Maintain fitness. Be sure you are in good physical condition at the start of soccer season. During the off-season, stick to a balanced fitness program that incorporates aerobic exercise, strength training, and flexibility.
  • Hydrate. It’s important to make sure you get the right amount of water before, during, and after exercise. Water regulates your body temperature and lubricates your joints. If you have not had enough fluids, your body will not be able to effectively cool itself through sweat and evaporation. You may experience fatigue, muscle cramps, dizziness and more serious symptoms, all of which can increase the likelihood of injury.
  • Ensure Proper Equipment. Wear shin guards to help protect your lower legs, as leg injuries are often caused by inadequate shin guards. You should wear the proper cleats depending on conditions, such as wearing screw in cleats on a wet field with high grass.
  • Prevent Overuse. Limit your amount of playing time. Adolescents should not play just one sport year round — taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development and injury prevention.
  • Cool down and stretch. Stretching at the end of practice is too often neglected because of busy schedules. Stretching can help reduce muscle soreness and keep muscles long and flexible. Be sure to stretch after each training practice to reduce your risk for injury.

At Emory Sports Medicine Center, our team of specialists is constantly conducting research and developing new techniques for diagnosing and treating the full range of sports-related injuries. Whether you are a professional athlete, or simply enjoy an active lifestyle, Emory provides comprehensive care, in a patient–family- centered environment, so together we achieve the best possible outcome and you can return to the sport you love. To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-3350 or complete our online appointment request form.

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About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunOluseun Olufade, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

Experts Reveal New Post-Concussion Treatment Recommendations: Rest Is Not Best

footballEarlier this month, 37 concussion specialists and researchers from around the country met in Pittsburgh to discuss the effectiveness of a common treatment option for concussions. I had the honor of representing Emory Healthcare and participating in this game-changing conference.

The goal of the two-day conference, which was held at University of Pittsburg Medical Center (UPMC), was to get the word out that concussions are treatable injuries and should no longer be treated with strict rest alone. There were several consensus statements on the issue that were debated in detail, and ultimately agreed/disagreed upon.

After much conversation, my fellow concussion experts and I came to the conclusion that despite popular belief, prolonged rest, a common treatment recommendation for concussions, does not aid in the recovery from a concussion and can actually worsen it. This conclusion is somewhat controversial because prolonged rest is a worldwide treatment method used by almost every person following a concussion. A major takeaway from this group was agreement that concussions are treatable and under the appropriate care an athlete should recover from the injury and excel at his or her highest performance levels.

Attention to traumatic brain injuries has increased over the past few years mainly due to an increase in sports-related injuries, especially from football. Athletes in the United States suffer around 300,000 concussions every year, but many mild concussions go undiagnosed and unreported so the number is even higher. Each concussion is unique and there is no one-size-fits-all way to treat them. Symptoms are not always visible, making it hard to definitively know when it’s safe for an athlete to return to play.

Because concussions are unique to each patient, assembling clinical profiles with common symptoms and treatments is key to the future development of concussion research and therapies. Active rehabilitation of concussions includes managing overall activity, subthreshold cognitive and physical activity, and focused therapy. Depending on the clinical profile with which a person suffering a concussion best aligns, the treatment plan may include certain specialized therapies, periods of rest, or cognitive exercise.

While this agreement did not produce immediate treatment protocols or guidelines, our hope is that the conference will spark more research on the subject. Over the next few months, the other physicians and I will compile our findings to be published in a medical journal, which will generate additional papers. As these papers are shared publicly, I am confident we will begin to move the ball forward regarding current and future concussion research and care.

We are proud that Emory Healthcare is recognized as a leading concussion program, as evidenced by our role during this national conference, and because of the amazing opportunity it will afford us to play an active role in changing the way concussions are treated for generations to come.

About Dr. Pombo

pombo-matMathew Pombo, MD, joined the Emory Orthopaedic Surgery faculty as a highly regarded orthopaedic surgeon, speaker, author and researcher who specializes in getting patients with injuries back to an active lifestyle. His professional interests include anatomic single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction, rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, meniscal/cartilage injury and repair, joint preservation in the aging athlete, and minimally invasive joint replacement surgery of the knee and shoulder.

Dr. Pombo has conducted extensive scientific research, published multiple journal articles, written several book chapters, and has presented at both national and international meetings on topics related to sports medicine, concussions, and orthopaedic surgery. He has been instrumental in bringing awareness to sports-related concussions and the new Georgia “Return to Play” Act and is one of the top regarded experts in the area for the treatment of concussions. He currently serves as the Director of the Emory Sports Concussion Program.

Dr. Pombo, his wife, and two boys, Eli and Henry, live in Johns Creek, GA. Dr. Pombo enjoys spending time with his family during his days off. Many of his patients also enjoy watching him succeed in his second career as a professional race car driver where he can be found driving at race tracks across North America.

Related Resources
Warning Signs of Concussions Not Always Visible
Concussions and Female Athletes
How to Recover Fully and Quickly from a Concussion
Takeaways from Dr. Mautner’s Concussion Chat

Injuries in the Young Athlete – How much is too much?

Student Athletes Injury PreventionChildren should be encouraged to participate in sports at a young age. Sports can teach children so many life lessons and helps children build their confidence. However, many parents are starting kids in sports at a young age in the hopes of developing their child into a scholarship athelte or a professional athlete. If a young athlete shows promise, many parents encourage their child to specialize in a specific sport and train year round from as young as 6 or 7 years old. This could be harmful because children’s bodies are still growing and developing. Young athletes are more prone to overuse injuries. It is estimated that close to half of the injuries in young athletes are related to overuse/overtraining. In addition to injuries, young athletes are also susceptible to overtraining syndrome and psychologic stress. Female athletes are particularly at risk for stress fractures and even delayed puberty.

With the exception of baseball pitch count research (which has studied how many pitches a young athlete could handle before injury), there is not conclusive research that indicates exactly how much is too much training for a young athlete. The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness recommends that young athletes should limit their sports specific activities to five days a week with one complete rest day from all physical activity. In addition, the same council recommends young student athletes take at least 2 months off a year from a specific sport to properly rest and rebuild their bodies. Young athletes should avoid playing on two teams in the same season.

Cross-training is good for the body. Our bodies are not designed to do the same thing over and over again, especially as youth and adolescents. It is also beneficial to play more than one sport. It allows athletes to develop more skills, be involved with a different group of teammates and coaches, and keeps them interested. It is also important to properly train the body in the preseason. In preparing for a season or a race it is important to increase training time/mileage by no more than 10% per week.

Sports are an excellent activity for young children and can help them develop life lessons they will use forever. Parents should be encouraged to pay attention to the child and allow them to rest and relax and take time away from their sport to rebuild and rejuvenate. Pay attention to a child who complains of muscle and joint pains, fatigue, or shows signs of psychologic stress. Athletics are a great way for youth to stay healthy and build a strong character, but remember that the number one reason that young people give for playing sports is “to have fun.”

About Jeff Webb, MD
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools and other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

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How to Prevent Summer Sports Injuries

Emory Sports Medicine patient Shawn Ploessl is a self proclaimed weekend warrior who sprained his ankle after playing football on the beach with some friends this summer. Many people are like Shawn in that when the weather starts getting nicer, we want to get outside and start working out or playing in a pickup game of baseball or football with friends. The problem is that most of us jump back into outdoor activities after being dormant over the winter and don’t properly warm-up or prepare our bodies for this increased activity.

In a recent news piece by CNN, Amadeus Mason, MD, Emory Sports Medicine physician, gives hints on what you can do to avoid injuries in the summer. Weekend warriors can start preparing themselves for the summer sports season by doing some exercising in the winter and early spring. Some activities that Dr. Mason recommends during the winter are running, indoor strengthening, and indoor cycling or spinning. Watch the entire piece below:

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About Dr. Mason

Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

Preventing and Treating Achilles Tears

Brandon Mines, MDYou may know that Chamique Holdsclaw, one of my former Atlanta Dream players (not to mention one of basketball’s most gifted female athletes), suffered an Achilles tendon injury this year. While this injury is common with basketball players, it is most prevalent in men ages 35-45. They’re often the “weekend warrior” types—so the injury is more likely to happen when they overdo it, and when they don’t have a good stretching regimen.

There are two basic variations of Achilles injuries: a bad sprain, and a complete tear. It’s important to know whether the Achilles is torn or not, because the treatment is very different: a torn Achilles means surgery; a strained Achilles means rehab and rest. Some people with Achilles tears are misdiagnosed with sprains, only to find out later that they have Achilles tears and they’ve missed the window to have it fixed. (An Achilles tear should be repaired within four weeks of tearing it.)

Here’s the difference between an Achilles strain and a tear: a strain is a gradual onset of pain that tends to get worse with more activity. An Achilles tear is a sudden injury, and it feels as if you were hit in the back of the ankle—the tendon actually pops and tears in a sudden fashion. Most people who have this tear will actually say, “Somebody must have kicked me me because I felt it in the back of my heel/ankle.”

If you’ve suffered an injury like this, it’s important for you to see a sports medicine doctor immediately. You can also take our Ankle Quiz.

If you’re healthy and uninjured, be sure to do everything you can to keep it that way. Here’s are some tips to prevent Achilles injuries:

  • Exercise regularly; in other words, don’t jump into a game of full-court basketball after not working out for a year.
  • Wear shoes with a lot of support.
  • Warm up and stretch for 15 minutes before playing.
  • Stretch and stay warm during breaks in the action.

Do you have any questions about the prevention or treatment of Achilles tendon injuries? If so, be sure to let me know in the comments section.

About Brandon Mines, MD:

Dr. Mines has been practicing with Emory since 2005 and specializes in family practice and sports medicine. His areas of clinical interest include ankle, shoulder, hand, knee, sports injuries, upper extremities, and wrist. Dr. Mines holds organizational leadership memberships at the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine.