Posts Tagged ‘spine surgeon’

Meet your Spine Surgeon: A Conversation with Dr. John Heller 

Spine Surgeon

The spine supports the body’s weight and protects the nerves in the spinal cord that run through it. It helps maintain the body’s muscle control and nerve coordination, and without it, we wouldn’t be able to function. Spine surgery, a subspecialty of orthopedic surgery, includes the treatment and management of a wide variety of conditions affecting the neck and back, including herniated discs and fractures.

For Emory Healthcare spine surgeon John G. Heller, MD, the care and treatment of patients with spine issues is personally rewarding. His practice works to improve the lives of patients while training the next generation of spine surgeons.

Patients, understandably, often have many questions regarding spine conditions and their treatment. Recently, Dr. Heller spoke with Dr. Bruce Feinberg for The Weekly Check-up on WSB Radio about a wide range of issues related to the spine surgery. The following are summarized excerpts.

Question: Tell us about your team.

Dr. Heller: Over the last 28 years I’ve been at Emory, our team of spine specialists has grown a lot and so has our field. Right now, we have a team comprised of 11 orthopedic and neuro-spine specialists who are surgeons. We also have more than a dozen non-operative specialists, whose job it is to keep people from meeting the surgeons. It’s the minority of folks who actually need to or end up seeing a surgeon.

Question: How have you seen your practice grow?

Dr. Heller: We’ve been really fortunate in recent years to have the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Hospital, in addition to Emory Midtown, to work in. It’s been a game changer for us and our patients. We have an entire hospital with a mission focused on joint replacement and spine. It’s a smoother experience for patients and we’ve seen that in our patient satisfaction rates, which are some of the highest in the country. We’re very proud of what we have built as a team, and in doing that alongside our educational and research activities. We now have points of access across the region to serve patients closer to home.

Question: How do you spend your days?

Dr. Heller: I alternate days either in the office all day or in the operating room all day. If I’m in the office, I see about 15 to 20 patients a day, which means I get to spend a good bit of time with each patient.

What we do really takes some time to get to know the patient, what’s going on and their options, and to go over all the information. On the days I’m operating, it can vary between a few operations that are several hours long each, to one operation that lasts anywhere from 10 to 14 hours.

Question: What is myelopathy?

Dr. Heller: We see and treat many cervical spine conditions, and this is one of our most common. Myelopathy is compression of the spinal cord caused by wear and tear which creates multiple points of pressure. We see this most commonly in those aged 55 and over. Myelopathy commonly presents with little to no pain, wobbly legs, and clumsy hands. There are a variety of different operations that we can do to help people with this condition.

Question: What is spinal stenosis?

Dr. Heller: Spinal stenosis is the narrowing of the spinal canal. As patients get older, their discs wear out and the place for the nerves in the low back and neck get crowded out. This condition can be associated leg pain, arm pain, back or neck pain, and sciatica.

Question: What is disc herniation?

Dr. Heller: Disc herniation commonly occurs in young healthy people who have a piece of a disc break off and compress a nerve. More than half the time, they never need to see a spine surgeon.

Question: What are your thoughts on using opioids to manage pain, given the concerns from patients and the medical industry?

Dr. Heller: Opioid abuse is dangerous, and we take prescribing opioids very seriously. Daily, on average, 142 people in the U.S. die because of prescription opioid accidents. We also know that taking opioids for a long enough period of time can make the pain worse, not better since they change the body’s central nervous system. I tell patients to use common sense, use what you need to when you need to, and don’t use it when you don’t need to.

Listen to the full conversation >>

Dr. Heller practices at Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. To learn more about Emory Orthopaedics & Spine surgeons and treatment options available to you, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/ortho or call 404-778-3350.


About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital

Emory’s Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital has locations across the Atlanta metro area. Emory’s physicians diagnose and treat conditions ranging from simple herniated disc and lower back and neck pain to more complex problems such as spinal tumor scoliosis and spine fractures. Emory Healthcare has the only hospital in Georgia that is dedicated to spine and joint surgery as well as non-operative spine and joint surgical interventions for physical therapy. For more information, or to schedule an appointment or an opinion, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/ortho.

About Dr. John Heller

John G. Heller, MD, is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, including cervical disc replacement and laminoplasty. His clinical interests include herniated disc sciatica, spinal stenosis, and spinal tumors. An internationally renowned lecturer and teacher, Dr. Heller is the past president of the Cervical Spine Research Society and was one of the first surgeons in the country to perform laminoplasty.

Learn more about Dr. Heller >>

Three Emory Surgeons Named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016

spine250x250Woot woot – it has been a great 2016 so far for Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center! Three of our spine surgeons were recently named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016. Congratulations to John Heller, MD, and Tim Yoon, MD, on receiving this achievement. Combined, these three physicians represent seventy-three years of spine surgery expertise. Impressively, eight other surgeons named to the list completed their residency and/or fellowship at Emory Healthcare.

Read below to learn what Becker’s Spine Review had to say about our nationally recognized spine surgeons:

Scott Boden, MD: Board-certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Boden serves as the director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and an orthopedic surgery professor at Emory University. He led the research on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology. Spine and the Journal of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, among other journals, have published his work. Dr. Boden received the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award, Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons’ Marshall R. Urist Young Investigator Award and five North American Spine Society Outstanding Research Paper Awards, among various other honors. Dr. Boden completed his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland.

John G. Heller, MD: Dr. Heller is a spine surgeon and the Baur Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory Healthcare. He focuses on the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, particularly in cervical disc replacement and laminoplasty. He was a Kashiwagi-Suzuki Traveling Fellow and he earned the Volvo Award for Low Back Pain Research. His additional training includes a fellowship with the University of California Medical Center in San Diego.

Tim S. Yoon, MD: Dr. Yoon is an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Emory Clinic. He is an active researcher, focusing on gene therapy for disc disease. His work has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Current Opinion in Orthopaedics and Skeletal Radiology. His clinical interests also include cervical fusion, compression fractures, disc degeneration, discectomy, herniated disc, kyphoplasty, kyphosis and laminoplasty. His additional training includes a spine fellowship in Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago.

About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Every day, the highly regarded physicians and surgeons at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center work together, across metro Atlanta, to diagnose and treat a variety of orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine conditions.

Our physicians use progressive treatment approaches – many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory. Learn more by clicking here, or call 404-778-3350.

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When Should You Consider Spine Surgery?

Spine SurgeryHave you been told you need spine surgery? If so, it’s reasonable to feel anxious or overwhelmed, which is why it’s especially important to gather appropriate information you’ll need to be an active part of the decision-making process. Below are a few things to consider before spine surgery:

  1. Over 90% of back and neck problems can be resolved without surgery. Nonsurgical treatments include anti-inflammatory medications, ice, heat, spinal injections and physical therapy.
  2. Rates of recommending surgery for the same problem vary widely in different parts of the country (and world), suggesting that the criteria for surgery are not always clear.
  3. Surgery does not benefit every type of spinal condition. While some conditions have a high success rate after surgery, others have less predictable success rates following surgery.
  4. 98% of all spine surgery is technically elective surgery, meaning it should be the choice of the patient, not something mandated by the surgeon.

Spine surgery is only needed in a small percentage of cases. Before surgery, it’s important to understand the likelihood of success, the possibility of residual or worsened symptoms, the risks of anesthesia, the risks of the spine surgery itself, and chances of recurrence in the future.

If your surgeon insists you must have surgery or has not discussed all of the points above with you, then you may benefit from a surgical second opinion.

In this radio clip taken during last month’s American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Annual Meeting, Dr. Boden shares more insight into spine surgery and when it’s appropriate. Listen>>

 

At Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, our spine surgeons and specialists are frontrunners in the research, development and perfection of the most effective approaches to treating spine, orthopedic, and sports medicine conditions, and our teaching other around the world to do the same.

To see if you may be a candidate for spine surgery, complete our spine quiz. Click to learn more about spine care at Emory, or call 404-778-7777.

 

About Scott Boden, MD

Scott Boden, MDScott D. Boden, MD, is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Boden started practicing at Emory in 1992. During his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland, Dr. Boden trained with one of the founding fathers of modern spine surgery, Dr. Henry Bohlman. A primary original researcher on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology, Dr. Boden is also an internationally renowned lecturer and teacher and the driving force behind the Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital (EUOSH).

Dr. Boden’s Clinical Interests:
Dr. Boden’s areas of clinical interest include surgical and nonsurgical management of adult degenerative spinal disorders including herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis in the cervical and lumbar spine. He was recently named in another Becker’s list of Top 50 Spine Surgeons in the U.S. and is a skilled surgeon with techniques of microdiscectomy, laminectomy, spinal fusion, and laminoplasty.

The Road to Emory: Education
• Medical School: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 1986
• Internship: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1987
• Residency: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1991
• Fellowship: Case Western Reserve University Hospital, Cleveland, OH 1992

Personal
Dr. Boden is the proud father of triplets who graduated first and tied for second in their high school class. He is also a baseball aficionado and coaches high school and travel softball teams.

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Scott Boden, MD, Named one of 62 Spine Surgeon Inventors to Know!

Dr. Scott Boden, an Emory Healthcare spine surgeon was recently named one of the 62 Spine Surgeon Inventors to Know by the highly regarded medical publication Becker’s Spine Review. Dr. Boden was selected as one of this prestigious group because of his work and research focus on spine fusion, spinal disorders and bone regeneration. He holds at least TWENTY (20) patents for medical devices. Read more about Dr. Boden and the other spine surgeons named to this list here.

Becker’s Spine Review spotlights Dr. Boden and his achievements in saying,

“Dr. Boden holds at least six different patents for medical devices and his research focuses on spine fusion, spinal disorders and bone regeneration. He is the director of Emory Healthcare’s orthopedics and spine center as well as chairman and founder of the National Spine Network. More than 150 of Dr. Boden’s journal articles have been published, and he has authored or edited more than 42 book chapters and nine books on spine topics. His research on the fundamental mechanisms of bone growth and regeneration has been awarded by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, North American Spine Society, International Society for Study of the Lumbar Spine and other professional organizations. He earned his medical degree at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, completed an internship at George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC, and received fellowship training at Case Western Reserve University Hospital in Cleveland.”


About Dr. Boden

Dr. Scott Boden Spine SurgeonScott D. Boden, MD, is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Boden started practicing at Emory in 1992. During his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland, Dr. Boden trained with one of the founding fathers of modern spine surgery, Dr. Henry Bohlman. A primary original researcher on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology, Dr. Boden is also an internationally renowned lecturer and teacher and the driving force behind the Emory University Orthopedics and Spine Hospital (EUOSH).

Dr. Boden’s Clinical Interests:
Dr. Boden’s areas of clinical interest include surgical and nonsurgical management of adult degenerative spinal disorders including herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis in the cervical and lumbar spine. He was recently named in another Becker’s list of Top 50 Spine Surgeons in the U.S. and is a skilled surgeon with techniques of microdiscectomy, laminectomy, spinal fusion, and laminoplasty.

The Road to Emory: Education

  • Medical School: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 1986
  • Internship: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1987
  • Residency: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1991
  • Fellowship: Case Western Reserve University Hospital, Cleveland, OH 1992

Personal
Dr. Boden is the proud father of triplets who graduated first and tied for second in their high school class. He is also a baseball aficionado and coaches high school and travel softball teams.

Blog Posts from Dr. Boden:

 

Collapsed Disc Spine Patient Races to Recovery

For years, triathlete Denise Novicki suffered from excruciating spinal pain in her lower back. Founder of Tri2Remember, a triathlon club that raises money to fight Alzheimer’s disease, Denise had always led an active lifestyle, but her back pain made it difficult, if not impossible, to enjoy her favorite pastime.

“I was in such immense pain that I was looking for some very trusted resources to manage my pain,” Denise says. She chose the Emory Spine Center at the Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital for assessment and a solution.

“What we’ve tried to do here at the Emory Spine Center is take the worry and the guessing out of a spine or back problem,” says Dr. Scott Boden (pictured left), director of the Center. “When people come here, we help them figure out what’s wrong and give them lots of different options.”

Before the spine doctors at the Emory Spine Center suggest surgery, they investigate all possible nonsurgical interventions, but they also know that, in some cases, a simple surgery may make the difference between experiencing debilitating pain and living pain free.

To find out the cause of her back pain, Denise met with spine surgeon Dr. John Heller, who discovered that she had a collapsed disc. It was clear to Dr. Heller that surgery would bring Denise relief and allow her to get her life back. “Denise came to us seeking advice on how to improve back pain that had really gotten in the way of her normal lifestyle,” says Dr. Heller. “She was an avid athlete and was having tremendous difficulty maintaining a training regiment, let alone a normal, everyday life.”

Before her spine surgery, Denise signed up for an upcoming Ironman distance race. She wanted to be sure she had a goal in place that would help her stay focused on recovery. She achieved her goal. “Coming into doing the Ironman, I had a different perspective than probably most athletes do, because I came to the table with thankfulness that I am actually able to compete. I did what I set out to do, and I couldn’t have done it without the team at Emory.” To learn more about Denise’s experience with spine surgery at Emory, check out the short video below:

Dr. Boden says, “The thing I love about taking care of patients with spine problems is that we have a real opportunity to help patients get their lives back, and that’s a very special thing.”

Dr. Scott BodenThe spine doctors at the Emory Spine Center are dedicated to excellent spine care. “Some places, people are part-time spine and part-time hips and knees, but what’s unique about our group is that everybody primarily focuses on taking care of patients with spine problems, teaching trainees who are learning about the spine, and doing research to try and explore new and better ways to treat spinal problems,” says Dr. Boden (pictured left). “If you end up coming to Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, you’ll leave saying that you’ve never been in a hospital that’s anything like it.”

Have you had spinal surgery at the Emory Spine Center? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

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