Posts Tagged ‘platelet rich plasma therapy’

Tennis Elbow & PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Therapy – Is it Right for Me?

Tennis Elbow PDFEmory Sports Medicine Center orthopedist, Dr. R. Amadeus Mason, recently spoke with the team from CNN about a study involving people with tennis elbow and the effectiveness of the treatment options. Check out this story to see what Dr. Mason recommends for treating tennis elbow.

Another treatment option available for chronic tendinitis like tennis elbow is Plasma Rich Platelet therapy, also know as PRP. The Emory sports medicine physicians use PRP to treat patients with chronic tendinitis or arthritis symptoms. Typically the patient will have tried other treatment options such as physical therapy, medications, and refraining from activity before being considered for PRP.

Dr. Mason explains, “PRP treatment is innovative because it takes a patient’s own blood and targets a specific area and harnesses its healing ability and allows us to treat specific types of injuries that otherwise would not be able to treat effectively.”

Typically during a PRP injection, a patient’s blood is drawn from his arm and transferred to a centrifuge machine where it spins the blood for about 15 minutes. The spinning separates the platelets from the other components of the blood. Using an ultrasound machine, the platelets are injected back into the patient into the damaged, painful area of the body.

Dr. Ken Mautner adds, “For the first time we can do a non-invasive, non-surgical procedure where we are just drawing blood from your arm and injecting right to the area of damage and actually get the body to heal itself without the need for a scalpel or any significant bed-rest or downtime.”

Watch this short video of Beth, an Emory Sports Medicine patient with tennis elbow. Beth tried several treatment options but in the end, PRP therapy allowed her to again be pain free and get back to the active lifestyle she wants to live.

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About R. Amadeus Mason, MD
Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track and Field and the National Scholastic Sports Foundation Track and Field and Cross Country meets, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He has also been a frequently featured guest CNN’s fit nation commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries. Dr. Mason attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

About Ken Mautner, MD
Ken Mautner, MDKen Mautner, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. Dr. Mautner started practicing at Emory in 2004 after completing a fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in PM&R with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, and several local high schools. He has focused his clinical interest on sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play recommendations for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy. Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

What is a Biomechnical Injury?

Dr. Amadeus Mason of Emory Sports Medicine explains biomechanical injuries and how they can be prevented and treated.

Biomechanical Injury

In sports medicine, we see a lot of biomechanical injuries. A biomechanical injury is caused by the overuse or incorrect use of a joint or muscle. This type of injury generally occurs when the joint has been stressed in the wrong way or overstressed repetitively over a short period of time. While any joint can sustain a biomechanical injury, at the Emory Sports Medicine Center, I see a lot of runners who come in complaining of knee pain.

Iliotibial band syndrome, or ITBS, is a biomechanical injury. It usually presents as pain on the outer side of the knee and is a common complaint among middle-distance runners or in athletes when they try to do too much running too quickly. This usually occurs early in the season or when athletes increase the intensity of their training, e.g., moving up from 5K to 10K distance.

To prevent a biomechanical injury, no matter where in the body it is, you need to be cognizant of how you’re stressing your joints and give your body enough time to accommodate the increased stress. If you’re a runner, start slow with low mileage (1–2 miles) and a moderate pace and slowly increase distance or intensity, but not both. If you’re lifting, start with a lighter amount of weight and a higher number of reps in each set and then, as you increase the weight, decrease the number of reps per set.

If you think you might have a biomechanical injury, you should be evaluated by a sports medicine specialist who understands biomechanical injuries. He or she can correctly determine the source of your pain and initiate the appropriate interventions so you can get better. If you’re in pain but not sure what type of injury you have, don’t take chances—come see a specialist here at the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Things to Keep in Mind if You Have (Or Suspect You Have) a Biomechanical Injury:

  • This type of injury will not just “heal on its own” with rest. You need to address the cause of the pain, or the symptoms will come back when you return to whatever activity caused the pain in the first place.
  • Don’t push through the pain. This pain is telling you that you’re doing something wrong. This is not a no-pain, no-gain situation.
  • There’s no quick fix. There’s no pill or quick shot that can cure a biomechanical injury. The best approach is to correct the problem using a holistic approach, which may include therapy, medications, modalities, and injections (as needed). Physiotherapy, in conjunction with steroid injections or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections, can help reduce inflammation and, in turn, alleviate pain and facilitate addressing the underlying biomechanical issues. This is why it’s important to seek the help of someone who understands this type of injury.

Have you had a biomechanical injury? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

Dr. Amadeus MasonAbout R. Amadeus Mason, MD:

R. Amadeus Mason, MD, is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track and Field and the National Scholastic Sports Foundation Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

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Top Four Ways PRP Therapy is Different at Emory Sports Medicine

Dr. Amadeus MasonFootball fans are anticipating a competitive Super Bowl match-up between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Green Bay Packers this Sunday. Steelers’ fans might remember that the last time the Steelers were in the Super Bowl—in 2009— wide receiver Hines Ward was very close to being unable to play because of a sprained medial collateral ligament of his right knee. Fortunately, he was able to contribute to his team’s victory over the Arizona Cardinals with the help of a cutting-edge procedure called platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections.

Since Ward’s high-profile recovery, PRP therapy has become a popular treatment for those suffering from ligament and tendon injuries—and Emory Sports Medicine has become a leader in the PRP therapy field.

Here’s how it works: PRP therapy is an outpatient procedure, in which blood is drawn and placed in a centrifuge for 15 minutes to separate out the platelets. The layer of platelet-rich plasma is then injected into the diseased portion of the tendon with the guidance of an ultrasound machine. Patients are then put on a program of relative rest followed by physical therapy for the first six weeks. After about 6 to 12 weeks, patients are re-evaluated for improvement. (Many patients require only one treatment.)

Sounds simple, right? It can be, but only if it’s performed properly and with the right expert guidance. Below we’ve outlined four factors that allow Emory Sports Medicine to excel at PRP therapy:

  1. We’ve been doing this since the beginning. PRP therapy is a fairly new procedure, and Emory has two doctors on staff who are skilled in performing it: Dr. Kenneth Mautner and myself. Both of us are dedicated to keeping up with the latest developments in the field.
  2. A vital step in the PRP process is the separating of platelets. We use only the most advanced centrifuge systems to ensure the highest concentration of platelets harvested from the process.
  3. We use ultrasound guidance to place the PRP into the affected tendon. Many other practices don’t use ultrasound—and the difference can be compared to dropping an atomic bomb vs. using a laser-guided missile. Although utilizing PRP in a generalized area can be helpful, placing it in a specific area will give the best chances at a positive result, proper healing, and full recovery.
  4. Emory Sports Medicine has developed a standardized post-injection protocol – a daily and weekly follow-up program designed to give patients the best chance at recovery.

While PRP therapy is still a relatively new procedure, when a skilled team of physicians does it properly, the results are remarkable. Just ask Hines Ward!

Are you considering PRP therapy? Do you have any questions regarding this procedure? If so, be sure to leave a comment here, or contact Emory Sports Medicine for an evaluation today.

About R. Amadeus Mason, MD:
Dr. Mason specializes in family practice and sports medicine. His areas of clinical interest include ankle, foot, shoulder, sports injuries, wrist, and ultrasound. Dr. Mason holds organizational leadership memberships with the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Georgia State Medical Association.