Posts Tagged ‘physical therapy’

5 Ways to Treat Arthritis, from an Emory Specialist

Learn five ways to treat arthritis, from physical therapy to surgery, from an Emory specialist.Millions of Americans have osteoarthritis, caused when the cushion between bones in a joint wears away. But you don’t have to live with daily pain, swelling and stiffness. Today’s arthritis treatments can offer dramatic, even long-term relief. Here are 5 ways to treat arthritis, from Emory sports medicine physician, Ken Mautner, MD.

  1. Physical therapy and occupational therapy. A physical therapist can help improve mobility in painful joints and increase overall strength. An occupational therapist can help you find ways to perform your daily activities.
  2. Cortisone injections. Cortisone, a powerful anti-inflammatory medicine, can be injected directly into a painful joint. Relief usually starts within a couple of days and can last for weeks or longer. Most people can get cortisone shots three or four times a year, at least six weeks apart. There are negative effects of too much cortisone so you should ask your physician if it is safe to have these injections performed.
  3. Stem cell injections. This innovative treatment, also called regenerative medicine, is available at only a few clinics nationwide, including Emory Healthcare. It can often provide significant pain relief, and possibly some regeneration. A doctor takes bone marrow cells from the back of your hip and injects them into the arthritic joint or related tendon. There is also a similar procedure using your blood or body fat that can help painful joints feel better.
  4. Joint repair or fusion. Orthopedic surgeons can often smooth and realign joint surfaces using minimally invasive techniques. For smaller joints, surgeons often remove the ends of the two bones and fuse them so that they heal into one unit.
  5. Joint replacement. An orthopedic surgeon replaces the arthritic joint with an artificial joint, (prosthesis). After recovering and physical therapy, most people have near complete pain relief.

Emory Healthcare’s specialists can help you create a treatment plan that works for your arthritis and your life. Would you like to learn more? Yes, I’d like to learn more now.

About Dr. Maturner

Dr. Kenneth Mautner helped this patient with foot pain.Dr. Ken Mautner is Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery At Emory University in Atlanta, GA. He is board certified in PM&R with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. He is the Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at Emory and Fellowship Director for the ACGME accredited Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship. Dr. Mautner is co-editor of the Atlas of Interventional Musculoskeletal Ultrasound. He has been using Musculoskeletal U/S in his practice since 2007 for and has been teaching courses around the country since 2009. In addition, He is considered a leader in the field of Orthobiologics treatment for chronic soft tissue and joint disorders. Dr. Mautner also serves as Team Physician for Emory University, Agnes Scott College, Pace Academy, and a Consulting Physician for Georgia Tech Athletes.

Extending Nationally-ranked Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine Care

MSKmapRecently, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital was recognized nationally as a top hospital in the country for orthopaedics*, but did you know that we have more than one location? In fact, Emory offers comprehensive orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine care at multiple locations across Atlanta:

Clinic Locations:
★ Atlanta (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Dunwoody (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Johns Creek
★ Sugarloaf
★ Tucker

Hospital Locations:

  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital
  • Emory University Hospital Midtown
  • Emory Johns Creek Hospital

Physical Therapy Locations:

  • Atlanta (3 different locations)
  • Dunwoody
  • Johns Creek
  • Sugarloaf
  • Tucker

Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital is Georgia’s first and only hospital designated primarily to spine and joint replacement surgery. Each of our orthopaedic physicians has received years of specific training to specialize in his or her area of expertise and all use progressive treatment approaches, many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine.

In additional to expanding our geographic reach over the last few years, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has continuously reinvested resources and funding back into its existing facilities to improve research, technology and care delivery models, ensuring that the patient and family experience is unmatched. This commitment to delivering supreme care has resulted in our patients consistently giving us some of the highest patient satisfaction scores in the country**.

To see an Emory orthopaedic, sports medicine or spine specialist at one of our convenient locations, call 404-778-3350 today. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours.

*Ranked by U.S. News & World Report

** Ranked by Press Ganey

 ortho-appt-bar

Related Resources:
Orthopaedics at Emory Healthcare

Understanding the Potential Benefits of Physical Therapy

National Physical Therapy MonthThe American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)’s National Physical Therapy Month (NPTM) is celebrated each October as a way to bring awareness around the potential health benefits to be sustained via physical therapy. Over 90% of back and neck problems, for example, will resolve themselves without surgery, and for some patients, there are unique benefits achieved from treatment by a physical therapist.

Physical therapy is a form of treatment—practiced by a licensed physical therapist under the referral of a physician. The purpose of physical therapy is to improve and/or restore mobility in patients for whom it is limited due to a medical condition, surgical procedure, accident or fall, neurological disease or other medical condition that has limited a patient’s functional mobility.  Often the injury limits the performance of everyday tasks.

Physical therapy programs at Emory Healthcare are available to support every type of mobility and functionality issue patients may experience. Whether a patient’s functional mobility issues relate to a neurological occurrence like a stroke, or an athletic injury like a torn ACL, our physical therapists available on both an inpatient and outpatient basis are here to help.

For more information on our physical therapy programs, including information on our department of Rehabilitation Medicine, please visit the links below.

Related Resources:

Can Yoga “Wreck” Your Body? A Physical Therapist’s Perspective

Emory’s David Pasion, MPT, physical therapist at the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Center was recently interviewed by the team at CNN in response to a recent article in the New York Times titled, “How Yoga Can Wreck Your Body.”

yoga physical therapist perspectiveAs Pasion put is, “Reading that article, if somebody wasn’t familiar with yoga or let’s say they were planning on doing yoga, if they read that article, they’d say, let me find something else to do. And so, in that aspect, no, I don’t think it was fair. There was too many negatives thrown out.”

While David Pasion agrees that it is possible to sustain injuries while practicing yoga, he also believes the article was “alarmist” and lacked context to present a fair assessment of the health benefits and risks of practicing yoga.

To get David’s take on the article and potential risks of participating in yoga, check out the video from CNN below:

Related Resources:

 

Why Your Rotator Cuff Matters More Than You Think – Part 1: How Your Rotator Cuff Works & What Happens When It Fails

Rotator Cuff painIt’s no surprise that the rotator cuff muscles are often ignored and rarely properly trained. A set of four relatively small muscles and tendons in the shoulder, their job is to keep the ball of the shoulder joint in place. That task may sound relatively simple, but consider the enormous forces that sometimes pass through our shoulders, putting serious strain on the little rotator cuff muscles. If they fail, a combination of pain, weakness and inefficient mechanics may prevent you from performing certain activities, limit your athletic pursuits or hurt your job performance.

The good news is that rotator cuff problems can often be prevented, and, if caught early, these injuries can often be treated with physical therapy alone. More serious rotator cuff injuries may require surgery. Our surgeons at Emory Sports Medicine are experts at performing rotator cuff surgery and getting you back to regular activity as soon as possible.

When The Rotator Cuff Fails…

Let’s back up and talk about what happens when your rotator cuff develops a problem. There are three stages of rotator cuff injury. The first stage is tendonitis, a simple inflammation of the rotator cuff, which can be painful but is relatively simple to treat. The second stage is tendinosis, in which the tendons of the rotator cuff start to degenerate. The third stage is a tear of the rotator cuff.

Tendonitis and tendinosis can usually be treated with physical therapy alone, with a high success rate. Very small tears may also be treatable with physical therapy, but generally a larger tear will require surgery to repair, followed by physical therapy to rebuild the rotator cuff and help prevent a future injury.

Signs of a Rotator Cuff Injury

The very best thing you can do to successfully treat a rotator cuff injury is to recognize it early and seek treatment promptly, hopefully before a tendonitis or tendinosis becomes a tear. Early treatment can mean the difference between physical therapy and surgery, and the difference between returning soon to the game or your work and an extended absence while recovering from surgery.

Early warning signs of a rotator cuff injury include:

  • Pain in your shoulder when you’re getting dressed, particularly when you are putting your shirt on or taking it off.
  • Pain in your shoulder when you’re reaching behind your body, such as to grab something out of the back seat of your car.
  • Pain when sleeping on your shoulder.

If any of these signs persist for more than a couple weeks, you should get your shoulder looked at promptly.

Signs of a more advanced rotator cuff injury include:

  • Weakness or a sense of instability in the shoulder.
  • “Night pain” in the shoulder: pain experienced when you are lying on your back and resting, pain that continues through the night.

If you have these symptoms, you should get your shoulder examined at Emory Sports Medicine right away. People over 50 who experience any of these symptoms are considered even more likely to have a rotator cuff injury.

So what are your treatment options if you injure your rotator cuff? And, more importantly, how can you prevent rotator cuff injuries from occurring in the first place? I’ll address those questions in part two of this post, so check back on the blog in about a week.

Michael Biller is the director of physical therapy for Emory Physical Therapy’s Perimeter and Sugarloaf locations and currently treats patients at the Perimeter location. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with his physical therapy degree in 1992. He is a board certified clinical specialist in orthopedics and is a McKenzie credentialed practitioner. Biller is a guest lecturer on many topics, including the spine and extremities, and serves as a book reviewer for the Journal of Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy. He is also Emory Physical Therapy’s clinical coordinator for student education. He is married to his lovely bride, Rachel, who is also a physical therapist, and has two children. Biller enjoys getting outdoors on the weekends, especially to go mountain biking and hiking.