Posts Tagged ‘orthopaedics’

Plantar Fasciitis Symptoms and Risk Factors

ankle-painAre you one of the over 2 million Americans who is suffering from plantar fasciitis this year? If you have stabbing pain in your heel right after getting out of bed or after long periods of standing or sitting you could be suffering from plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain and it is caused by inflammation in the thick band of tissue – plantar fascia – that stretches across the bottom of your feet, connecting your heel to your toes.

Plantar fasciitis affects some groups of people more than others. If you fit into any of the categories below, you may be at increased risk for plantar fasciitis:

• Middle – aged individuals: Plantar Fasciitis is most commonly experienced by people between 40-60 years of age
• Occupations that require standing: People who are on their feet a lot are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. This could include teachers, factory workers, soldiers, nurses and anyone else who stands a good portion of the day.
• Overweight individuals: Individuals who carry extra weight are at an increased risk for plantar fasciitis because the additional pounds add stress to your plantar fascia
• Active individuals: Any exercise that puts lots of stress on your heel and the attached band of tissue can lead to early-onset Plantar Fasciitis. Ballet dancers, runners and dance aerobicizers commonly develop plantar fasciitis.
• Individuals with impaired foot mechanisms: High arches, flat feet, or an irregular walking pattern can lead to incorrect weight distribution while standing. This puts additional strain on the plantar fascia in your feet and can lead to extreme heel pain.

It is important not to ignore heel pain, especially if it is so extreme that it gets in the way of your daily activities. Brushing aside plantar fasciitis may cause you to adjust the way you walk to decrease pain, which can lead to foot, knee, hip or back problems over time.

If you think you may have plantar fasciitis a good first treatment is rest! Cut back on the activities that hurt your heel. You can also try stretching your calves, toes and quads in order to reduce the pressure on the heel. If these simple remedies do not work, it is important to talk to your doctor so he or she can suggest the best treatment plan for you.

Related Links:

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis PDF

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Emory Doctors Relieve Chronic Heel Pain with New Shock Wave Therapy System – A First in Atlanta

Rami Calis, DPMAbout Rami Calis, DPM:

Rami Calis, DPM, is assistant professor in the Department of Orthopedics. He is board certified and a Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine, with an interest in sports medicine of the lower extremity and foot and ankle biomechanics. Dr. Calis sees patients at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center at Executive Park and also in Sugarloaf, at our satellite office. Dr. Calis’ professional goal is to improve patient care and quality of life for patients with foot and ankle problems. Dr. Calis began practicing at Emory in 2003.

Take-aways from our Pediatric Orthopaedic Hip and Spine Chat with Dr. Fletcher

On February 5, 2013, Dr. Nicholas Fletcher, Emory Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon held a  live web chat to answer questions pertaining to the newest treatment options for pediatric orthopedic hip and spine conditions such as scoliosis, kyphosis, hip dysplasia, leg length differences and femoroacetabular impingement.

One of the most common pediatric orthopedic problems is hip dysplasia. Hip dysplasia occurs when the hip socket does not form correctly, which can lead to hip dislocation as a child grows, stated Dr. Fletcher in the chat. Unfortunately, hip dysplasia cannot be diagnosed in a child before birth, a great question which was asked by one of the chat participants. While hip dysplasia is not particularly common, mild abnormalities of the hip socket are regularly seen at birth, but parents should not be alarmed, as these abnormalities typically get better within a couple of months of a child’s life. One of the pediatric hip dysplasia treatment options Dr. Fletcher mentioned in the chat is called the Ganz Osteotomy, a procedure available at Emory. The procedure is used to realign the hip and settings of hip dysplasia when it is found in teenagers and adults.

Participants were also interested to learn that Emory is one of only a few centers in the southeast that offer hip preservation surgeries. Hip preservation is a surgical approach to hip problems in teens and young adults designed to prevent the need for hip replacement down the road. It usually involves realigning an abnormal hip socket into a more normal position or removing bone spurs in the hip that could lead to early arthritis.

Dr. Fletcher provided some great insights and answered some hard pressing questions from chat participants. If you would like to know more about the causes and treatment options of Pediatric Orthopaedic Hip and Spine conditions be sure to take a look at the live web chat transcript. Also, for more information on Scoliosis and on how to become a patient visit Emory Orthopedic and Spine online today.

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