Posts Tagged ‘neck pain’

Is an Epidural Right for my Back or Neck Pain?

More than 90% of people with back or neck pain find relief through non-operative treatment. Some patients will benefit from physical therapy or treatment at a pain management center while others may need an injection or series of injections to help decrease their pain.

How do I know if a spinal injection is right for me?

Epidural Steroid Injection Back Pain

This is a difficult question to answer because not all patients are candidates for spinal injections. Some conditions are better treated with surgery while other conditions are more appropriately treated with conservative treatment including spinal injections.

Depending on the type and severity of your back or neck pain, your physician may recommend a spinal injection. The type of injection you receive is based on your specific symptoms and the physical exam performed by your physician.

What is an epidural steroid injection & how can it help my back pain?

A common injection that we perform is the epidural steroid injection. This type of injection is used to relieve radiating pain down the arm or leg. The medicine used in the injection is a mixture of long-acting anti-inflammatory steroid and numbing medication. During the injection, the physician will position you on the table and then perform the injection with the help of x-ray guidance to ensure the injection is given in the correct place.

Most patients will notice a decrease in pain within 2-3 days, but some may take 1-2 weeks to notice the benefit of the injection. Depending on your spine condition, your physician may recommend a series of epidural steroid injections. Your physician will discuss the treatment plan with you.

Epidural steroid injections are commonly administered without problems, but there is always a slight risk whenever you have an invasive treatment.

Recently, a serious concern has been raised in the national medical community regarding the use of contaminated steroids causing an infection of the spine called spinal meningitis. Fortunately, at Emory Spine Center we have always carefully selected the pharmacies we use to supply all of our medications, including the steroids used for injections. Only those suppliers with best quality control have been chosen. Clearly, the end result has been beneficial as none of our patients received contaminated steroids.

It is important to remember that serious complications like the one discussed above are extremely rare. Please visit our website to learn about the other spinal injections we perform.

About Dr. Jose Garcia-Corrada

Dr. Jose Garcia-Corrada

Dr. Garcia-Corrada is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Emory University School of Medicine. He specializes in non-operative spine care and focuses on helping patients achieve their best functional level. Dr. Garcia started practicing at Emory in 2001.

 

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Is Your Desk Job Hurting You?

Neck Back Pain Desk Job PostureThese days, more and more jobs are desk jobs, meaning many people spend a minimum of eight hours a day behind their desks and at their computers. I frequently see patients with neck and back pain with no specific injury, but who spend many hours behind a computer. This type of work can have a number of health implications, including muscle and joint pain.

If you’re a desk jockey, one of the easiest things you can do to prevent pain from a poor workstation set-up is to have an ergonomic setup designed just for you. You want your chair and work station to fit you properly. Here are a few tips to help get you started:

  • Be sure your body is properly aligned with your desk and your computer. You should be able to sit straight in front of your computer and not have to turn from side to side to access it.
  • Keep your head, neck, and torso in line, and keep your arms and elbows close to your body but within reaching distance of your keyboard. You shouldn’t have to reach forward to use your keyboard.
  • While typing, your elbows should be at a 90-degree angle from your body, and your wrists and hands should be in a straight line, with your wrists in a neutral position, not arched or bent.
  • To prevent back pain, be sure your chair has good back support.
  • When you’re sitting, your thighs should be parallel to the ground or a little higher than your knees, and your feet should touch the ground. You don’t want the end of chair hitting the back of your knees—you want a little gap there.

Neck pain is a common complaint of people who spend a lot of time on the phone. If you find yourself cradling your phone between your shoulder and chin so you can type and talk at the same time, switch to a headset or use a speaker phone.

Don’t forget to get up and move around regularly throughout the day. If you feel pain during your work day, stretching and moving around can help ease that pain, as can a heating pad or ice pack. You may even find some relief by treating yourself to a massage at one of the many Atlanta spas. I always tell each patient to listen to your body. If you are having pain, your body is trying to send you a message. If you are having neck or back pain that isn’t improving after trying the tips above, make an appointment with an Emory Spine physiatrist for further evaluation and treatment.

Do you spend a lot of time behind a desk? What do you do to get moving and ease pain? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

About Diana Sodiq, DO:

Diana Sodiq, DO, is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry). As an osteopathic physician, Dr. Sodiq is trained in both traditional medicine as well as osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT). She started practicing at Emory in 2010.