Posts Tagged ‘MD chat’

How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races – Join Us for a Live Online Chat!

Running Training Live ChatWhether you are a seasoned marathon runner or recreational jogger, it is important to train properly and know how to prevent injury.

If you are interested in learning more about preventing and treating sports and running injuries, join Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD, for an online web chat on Tuesday, June 9 at noon. Dr. Mason will be available to answer your questions such as:

  • Injury prevention
  • Stretching
  • Race-day tips
  • Symptoms of certain athletic injuries
  • Risk factors for athletic/running injuries
  • Treatment for specific sports injuries
  • When to visit your sports medicine physician

To register for the live chat, visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats! If you already have questions for Dr. Mason, go ahead and submit in advance so our team can answer during the chat!

Sign Up for the Chat

From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapies and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for a range of athletic-related injuries. Visit our website to learn more about the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Olufade’s Ankle Sprain Chat

Ankle SprainThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 27, for our live online chat on “Symptoms, diagnosis and treating an ankle sprain,” hosted by Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD.

With summer coming into full swing, a lot of us are out, about and getting more active. Some of our activities can lead to ankle sprains. Dr. Olufade discussed some common misconceptions about treating sprained ankles and exercises you can do to strengthen your ankles to help prevent sprains.

See all of Dr. Olufade’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: My son rolled his ankle this weekend at the beach. What do I need to do?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Great question! We use something called the RICE principle. Start with “R”est by staying off the foot, “I”ce the ankle for 20 minutes at a time every hour or two, use “C”ompression, like an Ace bandage, and “E”levate the foot as much as possible.

 

Question: What are some common mistakes that people make when they think they have an ankle sprain? In other words, what do people do to “treat” ankle sprains that can actually make them worse?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Ankle sprains can be associated with fractures. Some people try to “walk it off” if they think they have an ankle sprain, and without a proper diagnosis, you could actually be doing more damage to your ankle without knowing it.

If you do have an ankle sprain (not a fracture) I would recommend resting the injured ankle for 3-5 days. Some people worry and stay off of the foot for too long. Prolonged immobilization will make for a longer recovery. People often also make the mistake of using heat on the acute ankle sprain. Heat can actually worsen swelling, so ice packs are recommended instead of heat.

Question: How can you tell if you have a fracture and not just a sprain? Are there any additional symptoms other than increased pain?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Fractures are usually diagnosed by x-rays. You should see a doctor to confirm whether you have a fracture or not.
 
 
 
 
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/ortho for a full list sports medicine treatments offered.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Olufade, fee free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

10 Tips for a Healthy Peachtree Road Race Run

Peachtree Road RaceRunning is great exercise for your health and your mind. Follow the tips below to ensure that you are in top form on race day. Have a safe and fun Peachtree Road Race!

  1. Hydrate yourself frequently before, during and after running in order to loosen muscles.
  2. Warm up and/or stretch before the race to loosen tight muscles.
  3. Run slower in hot weather in order to avoid heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion.
  4. Use hand lotion on feet and areas of chafing to prevent skin damage and blisters.
  5. Don’t forget to use sunscreen to protect against sunburn.
  6. Wear sunglasses to reduce glare and avoid tripping.
  7. When your energy is gone, imagine someone running in front of you and pulling you forward.
  8. Get your rest! Sleep one extra minute each night for every mile you run. For example, if you run 30 miles a week, sleep 30 additional minutes each night.
  9. Change soggy, sweaty socks soon after the run and stuff shoes with newspaper to avoid moisture buildup.
  10. Pay attention to your body! If you experience pain during or after the race and it does not go away, something may be wrong. Schedule an appointment with an Emory Sports Medicine physician.

Related Running Resources:

Still looking for more tips? Check out the transcripts from a few of our recent MD chats on running using the links below:

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part I

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part II

More Running Questions Answered