Posts Tagged ‘live online chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s Chat on How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races

Running Live ChatThank you for attending the live chat on How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races on Tuesday, June 9 with Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. From tips for preventing shin splints to advice on how to train for a 5K, we were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Question: I have inflammation behind my knee. What can I do?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: Inflammation behind the knee can be due to a number of knee conditions. Baker’s cyst are common and can be caused by injury to the knee, arthritis, damage to the cartilage of the knee, and other problems. Sprains (caused by overstretching and tearing of the stabilizing ligaments) can lead to swelling of the knee area as well.

Seek immediate medical attention if you are in serious pain, or are experiencing symptoms such as: paralysis, loss of sensation, absent pulses in the feet, the inability to move the knee joint, severe bleeding, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or uncontrollable pain.

Swelling behind the knee may not produce any other symptoms, but if your condition persists and continues to cause concern, seek an evaluation from a sports medicine physician or knee specialist.

Question: What is the best way to correct an IT band injury that has caused can imbalance and pain while running?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: If treated appropriately with conservative treatment and resting of the affected area, IT Band Syndrome is usually curable within 6 weeks. If your injury was not appropriately treated, or not given adequate time to heal, the source of your current complications may be due to:

  • Chronically inflamed tendon and bursa, causing persistent pain with activity that may progress to constant pain.
  • Recurrence of symptoms if activity is resumed too soon through overuse, a direct blow, or poor training technique.
  • Inability to complete training or competition.

Until you are able to seek an evaluation from a sports medicine physician, I would discontinue the activity (ies) that are causing you pain so you do not further damage the iliotibial band.

Question: I get cramps in my calf when I run but not when walking. Is there a remedy?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: Cramps are a result of a few factors, but dehydration and improper warm-up are the most common causes.

To prevent muscle cramps, runners need to consume enough fluid before exercising. Some healthy tips are:

  • Drink 16 to 20 ounces 45 minutes before training.
  • Drink 2 to 4 ounces every 15 minutes during a training session.
  • Before you begin your run, warm up with 5 to 10 minutes of low impact activity, like walking to warm up the muscles.

For more information about all our orthopedic and sports-related injuries, visit Emory Sports Medicine Center. Think you need to be evaluated by a sports medicine physician? To make an appointment with an Emory physician, please complete our online appointment request form or call 404-778-3350.

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How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races – Join Us for a Live Online Chat!

Running Training Live ChatWhether you are a seasoned marathon runner or recreational jogger, it is important to train properly and know how to prevent injury.

If you are interested in learning more about preventing and treating sports and running injuries, join Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD, for an online web chat on Tuesday, June 9 at noon. Dr. Mason will be available to answer your questions such as:

  • Injury prevention
  • Stretching
  • Race-day tips
  • Symptoms of certain athletic injuries
  • Risk factors for athletic/running injuries
  • Treatment for specific sports injuries
  • When to visit your sports medicine physician

To register for the live chat, visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats! If you already have questions for Dr. Mason, go ahead and submit in advance so our team can answer during the chat!

Sign Up for the Chat

From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapies and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for a range of athletic-related injuries. Visit our website to learn more about the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Oskouei’s Stem Cell Treatment Chat

Stem Cell TreatmentThank you for attending the live chat on Stem Cell Treatment for Osteoarthritis on Tuesday, Aug. 12. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. Check out the chat transcript for a full list of questions and answers!

The response was so great that we had a several questions we were not able to answer during the chat, so we will answer them below for your reference. The questions have been broken into sections based on topic:

Surgical vs. Non-Surgical Stem Cell Treatment

  • How exactly do both stem cell treatments work?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

When implanted surgically, they recruit surrounding cartilage cellsand begin differentiation into mature cartilage.

  • Can you explain the differences in “stem cell implantation surgery” and “stem cell injections?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Injections alleviate pain and symptoms; whereas,  surgical implantation surgery is a way to actually grow cartilage in areas where the cartilage is lacking.

  • What determines whether you get the surgical or nonsurgical procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on patient preference, but also on the amount of damage. If the damage is severe, the patient may not be a candidate for surgical implantation. An MRI is useful in determining who is a good candidate.

  • Is the surgical procedure preferable to the injection for a knee?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on patient preference, but also on the amount of damage.

  • For the surgical solution, are a patient’s own stem cells used?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes, we use the patient’s own stem cells.

 

Recovery

  • How long does it take to notice a difference/improvement in symptoms and pain?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It typically takes about six weeks to notice a difference in pain.

  • Do you recommend PT after the procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes, I recommend physical therapy, but it should not be very aggressive.

  • Will the stem cells migrate to other parts of the body, helping more than just the targeted joint?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, the stem cells stay in the targeted joint.

  • Do you have any statistics on how long a time period patients typically experience pain relief after receiving the injections treatment?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Patients typically experience pain relief for about four to six months.

  • Does the osteoarthritis then stop progressing in that area or will it eventually take over again?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

In the case of surgical implantation, osteoarthritis is stopped and often reversed.

  • After the injection, how long before someone could resume walking 1-2 miles per day if they had been doing so before the treatment?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

I would suggest waiting about six weeks.

 

Candidacy

  • Is stem cell therapy an option for people whose osteoarthritis is advanced? If not, what is the alternative?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on the severity and grade of cartilage damage. Alternatives include joint replacement surgery.

  • Do you expect the procedure to improve in the future so those of us with late osteoarthritis might avoid surgery?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

That is possible now!

  • If the knee is bone on bone, would this still be a candidate?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on the amount of cartilage loss, not just the depth of cartilage loss. In other words, if the patient has a subtotal area of cartilage loss, even if its bone on bone, then they would be a candidate. If the whole joint surface is devoid of cartilage, then they are likely not the best surgical candidate.

  • In cases where the condition is severe with pronounced bowing of the leg is this procedure recommended? Also will the bowing be corrected?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, with severe deformity, reconstructive surgery is generally recommended.  However, some slight varus (bowing) deformity is acceptable for stem cell treatment.

  • How does one begin the process for determining if the procedure is recommended?  Do you see patients for assessment or is that done by someone else?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

I see them. I would love to see an X-ray and MRI of your affected joint. We can order it or you can order it and send it in for us to evaluate it.

  • How do you get evaluated for this procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Call 404-778-6363 to schedule an appointment.

  • I am 70, and have had both knees and my right hip replaced. Am I too old to have the procedure done on my left hip?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, not at all. We would love to see your MRI to see if you’re a candidate.

  • Is this something a 60 year old man should be looking into?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Absolutely!


Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Age isn’t as much of a factor as the amount of cartilage loss and deformity. 80 year old patients have benefited from this procedure in the past.

 

Traveling for Treatment

  • For out of town patients, how long should we plan to be in Atlanta for the procedure? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Two days.

  • For patients from overseas can the PRP injection be administered on same day as stem cell injection? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes.

  • If we do not live close, can we mail a copy of the MRI i to see if we are a candidate? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes! That’s ideal.

About Dr. Oskouei

Shervin Oskouei, MDShervin V. Oskouei, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University, is an expert in the treatment of musculoskeletal (extremity) tumors, total hip and total knee replacements and revisions. Dr. Oskouei started practicing at Emory in 2004. Dr. Oskouei is board-certified and fellowship trained in orthopaedic surgery. Combining his experience and interests with the state-of-the-art facilities of Emory University and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University allows Dr. Oskouei to treat patients with the latest modalities using a multi-disciplinary approach.

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Stem Cell Treatment for Osteoarthritis – What is it and is it right for you?

Stem Cell ChatDid you know that physicians at Emory are now treating osteoarthritis by using a patient’s own stem cells? It is one of the latest advances in orthopaedic care and Emory Orthopaedics surgeon, Shervin Oskouei, MD, and some of his colleagues are doing the procedure here in Atlanta. Find out more about this unique procedure and whether it is right for you by joining us on Tuesday, August 12 for a live, online web chat. During this hour long, informal chat, you can ask specific questions about this groundbreaking new procedure such as:

  • Is stem cell treatment a good option for patients with osteoarthritis, loss of cartilage in the joint, or chronic tendon injuries?
  • What are the stem cell treatment options currently available?
  • Who is a candidate for this type of treatment?
  • Are there other stem cell treatments for osteoarthritis coming soon to the market?
  • What happens during the procedure?
  • Can you recover fully after this procedure?
  • And more…

To sign up for the live chat visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Dr. Oskouei

Shervin V. Oskouei, MDShervin V. Oskouei, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University, is an expert in the treatment of musculoskeletal (extremity) tumors, total hip and total knee replacements and revisions. Dr. Oskouei started practicing at Emory in 2004. Dr. Oskouei is board-certified and fellowship trained in orthopaedic surgery. Combining his experience and interests with the state-of-the-art facilities of Emory University and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University allows Dr. Oskouei to treat patients with the latest modalities using a multi-disciplinary approach.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.