Posts Tagged ‘live chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Oskouei’s Stem Cell Treatment Chat

Stem Cell TreatmentThank you for attending the live chat on Stem Cell Treatment for Osteoarthritis on Tuesday, Aug. 12. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. Check out the chat transcript for a full list of questions and answers!

The response was so great that we had a several questions we were not able to answer during the chat, so we will answer them below for your reference. The questions have been broken into sections based on topic:

Surgical vs. Non-Surgical Stem Cell Treatment

  • How exactly do both stem cell treatments work?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

When implanted surgically, they recruit surrounding cartilage cellsand begin differentiation into mature cartilage.

  • Can you explain the differences in “stem cell implantation surgery” and “stem cell injections?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Injections alleviate pain and symptoms; whereas,  surgical implantation surgery is a way to actually grow cartilage in areas where the cartilage is lacking.

  • What determines whether you get the surgical or nonsurgical procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on patient preference, but also on the amount of damage. If the damage is severe, the patient may not be a candidate for surgical implantation. An MRI is useful in determining who is a good candidate.

  • Is the surgical procedure preferable to the injection for a knee?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on patient preference, but also on the amount of damage.

  • For the surgical solution, are a patient’s own stem cells used?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes, we use the patient’s own stem cells.

 

Recovery

  • How long does it take to notice a difference/improvement in symptoms and pain?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It typically takes about six weeks to notice a difference in pain.

  • Do you recommend PT after the procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes, I recommend physical therapy, but it should not be very aggressive.

  • Will the stem cells migrate to other parts of the body, helping more than just the targeted joint?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, the stem cells stay in the targeted joint.

  • Do you have any statistics on how long a time period patients typically experience pain relief after receiving the injections treatment?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Patients typically experience pain relief for about four to six months.

  • Does the osteoarthritis then stop progressing in that area or will it eventually take over again?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

In the case of surgical implantation, osteoarthritis is stopped and often reversed.

  • After the injection, how long before someone could resume walking 1-2 miles per day if they had been doing so before the treatment?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

I would suggest waiting about six weeks.

 

Candidacy

  • Is stem cell therapy an option for people whose osteoarthritis is advanced? If not, what is the alternative?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on the severity and grade of cartilage damage. Alternatives include joint replacement surgery.

  • Do you expect the procedure to improve in the future so those of us with late osteoarthritis might avoid surgery?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

That is possible now!

  • If the knee is bone on bone, would this still be a candidate?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

It depends on the amount of cartilage loss, not just the depth of cartilage loss. In other words, if the patient has a subtotal area of cartilage loss, even if its bone on bone, then they would be a candidate. If the whole joint surface is devoid of cartilage, then they are likely not the best surgical candidate.

  • In cases where the condition is severe with pronounced bowing of the leg is this procedure recommended? Also will the bowing be corrected?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, with severe deformity, reconstructive surgery is generally recommended.  However, some slight varus (bowing) deformity is acceptable for stem cell treatment.

  • How does one begin the process for determining if the procedure is recommended?  Do you see patients for assessment or is that done by someone else?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

I see them. I would love to see an X-ray and MRI of your affected joint. We can order it or you can order it and send it in for us to evaluate it.

  • How do you get evaluated for this procedure?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Call 404-778-6363 to schedule an appointment.

  • I am 70, and have had both knees and my right hip replaced. Am I too old to have the procedure done on my left hip?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

No, not at all. We would love to see your MRI to see if you’re a candidate.

  • Is this something a 60 year old man should be looking into?

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Absolutely!


Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Age isn’t as much of a factor as the amount of cartilage loss and deformity. 80 year old patients have benefited from this procedure in the past.

 

Traveling for Treatment

  • For out of town patients, how long should we plan to be in Atlanta for the procedure? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Two days.

  • For patients from overseas can the PRP injection be administered on same day as stem cell injection? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes.

  • If we do not live close, can we mail a copy of the MRI i to see if we are a candidate? 

Shervin Oskouei, MDDr. Oskouei:

Yes! That’s ideal.

About Dr. Oskouei

Shervin Oskouei, MDShervin V. Oskouei, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University, is an expert in the treatment of musculoskeletal (extremity) tumors, total hip and total knee replacements and revisions. Dr. Oskouei started practicing at Emory in 2004. Dr. Oskouei is board-certified and fellowship trained in orthopaedic surgery. Combining his experience and interests with the state-of-the-art facilities of Emory University and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University allows Dr. Oskouei to treat patients with the latest modalities using a multi-disciplinary approach.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Olufade’s Ankle Sprain Chat

Ankle SprainThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 27, for our live online chat on “Symptoms, diagnosis and treating an ankle sprain,” hosted by Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD.

With summer coming into full swing, a lot of us are out, about and getting more active. Some of our activities can lead to ankle sprains. Dr. Olufade discussed some common misconceptions about treating sprained ankles and exercises you can do to strengthen your ankles to help prevent sprains.

See all of Dr. Olufade’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: My son rolled his ankle this weekend at the beach. What do I need to do?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Great question! We use something called the RICE principle. Start with “R”est by staying off the foot, “I”ce the ankle for 20 minutes at a time every hour or two, use “C”ompression, like an Ace bandage, and “E”levate the foot as much as possible.

 

Question: What are some common mistakes that people make when they think they have an ankle sprain? In other words, what do people do to “treat” ankle sprains that can actually make them worse?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Ankle sprains can be associated with fractures. Some people try to “walk it off” if they think they have an ankle sprain, and without a proper diagnosis, you could actually be doing more damage to your ankle without knowing it.

If you do have an ankle sprain (not a fracture) I would recommend resting the injured ankle for 3-5 days. Some people worry and stay off of the foot for too long. Prolonged immobilization will make for a longer recovery. People often also make the mistake of using heat on the acute ankle sprain. Heat can actually worsen swelling, so ice packs are recommended instead of heat.

Question: How can you tell if you have a fracture and not just a sprain? Are there any additional symptoms other than increased pain?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Fractures are usually diagnosed by x-rays. You should see a doctor to confirm whether you have a fracture or not.
 
 
 
 
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/ortho for a full list sports medicine treatments offered.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Olufade, fee free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

Concussions in Young Athletes – Chat with Dr. Mautner!

School is back in session for most of Atlanta and the surrounding communities and that means the start of fall sports!  While this can be an exciting time, it can also be a time where parents and coaches educate themselves in order to keep our children safe.   According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there is approximately a 60% increase in the number of concussions and traumatic brain injuries during the last 10 years.  In 2009, there were more than 248,000  traumatic brain injuries in young people under the age of 19 from sports such as bicycling, football, basketball, soccer and from playground injuries.

If you have a young child or a student athlete who is participating in sports and want to learn more about how to prevent, detect and treat concussions join us on Tuesday, September 10th at noon for a live online chat to discuss the topic. We will also discuss what the new law in Georgia regarding concussion means for your child.  Dr. Ken Mautner will be available to answer questions in an informal yet educational session.

Sign Up for the Chat

For more information or to register please visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About  Kenneth Mautner, MD
Ken Mautner, MDKen Mautner, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. Dr. Mautner started practicing at Emory in 2004 after completing a fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in PM&R with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, and several local high schools. He has focused his clinical interest on sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play recommendations for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy. Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

About Emory Sports Medicine
The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory Sports Medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours in most cases. Call 404-778-7777 for an appointment.

Does Your Child Have Hip or Spine Problems? Chat Live with Dr. Fletcher!

Pediatric Orthopedic ChatDid you know that children can be affected by a wide array of orthopaedic hip and spine issues? Scoliosis, kyphosis, hip dysplasia, leg length differences and femoroacetabular impingement are just a few of the conditions our team sees most commonly from pediatric patients. These conditions can lead to time away from school and chronic pain and disability later in life.

Join Emory Pediatric Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Nicholas Fletcher, for a live interactive web chat on Tuesday, February 5 at noon to get all your questions about symptoms, causes and the newest treatment options for pediatric orthopedic hip and spine conditions answered! See you there!


Sign Up for the Chat


About Dr. Fletcher
Dr. Nicholas FletcherDr. Fletcher takes care of all pediatric orthopaedic trauma, neuromuscular disorders, leg length differences, foot conditions, and angular deformities of the lower limbs. In addition, the management of pediatric spinal and hip conditions are particular areas of expertise. Dr. Fletcher also specializes in pediatric and young adult hip conditions including hip dysplasia, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), perthes disease, avascular necrosis, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. He is one of only a handful of surgeons in the southeast with expertise in the Ganz or periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for hip dysplasia and the modified Dunn osteotomy for slipped capital femoral epiphysis. He takes care of children of all ages with hip conditions in addition to young adults with hip dysplasia and impingement.

10 Tips for a Healthy Peachtree Road Race Run

Peachtree Road RaceRunning is great exercise for your health and your mind. Follow the tips below to ensure that you are in top form on race day. Have a safe and fun Peachtree Road Race!

  1. Hydrate yourself frequently before, during and after running in order to loosen muscles.
  2. Warm up and/or stretch before the race to loosen tight muscles.
  3. Run slower in hot weather in order to avoid heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion.
  4. Use hand lotion on feet and areas of chafing to prevent skin damage and blisters.
  5. Don’t forget to use sunscreen to protect against sunburn.
  6. Wear sunglasses to reduce glare and avoid tripping.
  7. When your energy is gone, imagine someone running in front of you and pulling you forward.
  8. Get your rest! Sleep one extra minute each night for every mile you run. For example, if you run 30 miles a week, sleep 30 additional minutes each night.
  9. Change soggy, sweaty socks soon after the run and stuff shoes with newspaper to avoid moisture buildup.
  10. Pay attention to your body! If you experience pain during or after the race and it does not go away, something may be wrong. Schedule an appointment with an Emory Sports Medicine physician.

Related Running Resources:

Still looking for more tips? Check out the transcripts from a few of our recent MD chats on running using the links below:

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part I

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part II

More Running Questions Answered

More Runners’ Chat Questions Answered

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Wednesday, I held a live chat on the topic of running to help those preparing for the Peachtree Road Race and to educate runners of all skill levels on injury prevention, nutrition, and technique. It was my first so-called “live chat,” so I really didn’t know what to expect. The questions that I received in yesterday’s chat were fantastic. Not only do I feel like I got to help the 50+ people who joined me in the chatroom, but I myself was able to learn something in the process. Typically when I chat with people who have questions for me, they are my patients, in a one-on-one setting. This really gives me the time to feel them out and learn about them as individuals. Wednesday, I was charged with a new and equally inspiring and fulfilling task– to educate a group, without being able to see them in person or learn about them before we talked. It was an extremely eye opening experience.

I want to thank those who joined me Wednesday for a wonderful chat. It was so successful, in fact, that I didn’t get a chance to answer each and every question. For those who were in the room, I promised to follow up with a blog to answer all questions that were unaddressed, and I have done so below. At the bottom of this blog post, you will also find the documents I mentioned in the chat for your further reference. As an added bonus, to make sure everyone gets a chance to discuss the topic of running and all of its facets with me, we will be holding the next live chat on running on June 15th. PART II CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Larry: I ran a marathon with IT band issues.  What can I do to prevent it in the future?
Dr. Mason: Larry, to prevent IT band problems, you should strive to work on increased flexibility. I’d advise that you watch the rate at which you increase your mileage/distance and start training early enough to allow for a slow and steady progress with sufficient recovery times between training sessions.

Shirley: Dr. Mason, Why does my back hurt periodically when I am tired while running?  Should I bend over to stretch?  I am a beginner.
Dr. Mason: I can’t speak to your specific medical circumstances without seeing you in-person, but generally speaking, oftentimes people experience back pain while running due to hamstring tightness. For these patients, I advise that they avoid the typical stretch that involves bending over, and instead focus on extension type exercises.

M. White: How do I know when it is time for new running shoes?  This will be my first time running longer than a 5k.
Dr. Mason: My recommended guidelines for footwear are if you run more than 20 – 25 miles a week you should change you shoes every 3 – 4months ( ~300 miles); if you run less than 20 miles a week can change shoes twice a year.

Sylvia: Hi. Dr. Mason. Is there any particular type of shoe that you would recommend as best for protecting against injuries; Knees, ankles, shin splints, etc.?
Dr. Mason: Studies have shown that shoe comfort is a more important factor in preventing injury than the actual type of shoe.  I would recommend you get evaluated at your local running store to determine what class of running should would be best for you. After doing that, go ahead and pick the most comfortable one in that class.

Judy: I’m used to walking about 3 miles about 3 times a week.  I am signed for the Peachtree.  Obviously I will be walking it.  I have 6 weeks to step up my training.  How would you suggest I proceed to get to 6 miles in time for the race?  Thanks.
Dr. Mason: Good question, Judy. I’d recommend adding about ½ mile to your distance each week.

Steve: Dr. Mason, I have a chronic hamstring issue.  What can I do to help the issue?  What type of Dr. or therapist should I seek out for help?
Dr. Mason: I would recommend you see a physician with sports medicine training.

M. White: I have been training for a 5k (took 30min) – which I ran a couple of weekends ago.  To train for the Peachtree what should I do?  Increase distance or time?
Dr. Mason: My answer here depends on whether you want to run the Peachtree for time or just for fun.  Since this race is twice the distance of a 5k,  I would start out increasing your distance (1/2 mile a week. Once you get to 5 miles then you can start increasing your pace.

Mac: What are some good lower-fat proteins for vegetarian novice runners?
Dr. Mason: As a vegetarian you should be concerned about getting in GOOD fats as opposed to LOW fat.  To that end eating things like beans, nuts and/or soy would be good choices.

Dawn: When I ran the Peachtree last year, I found it difficult to actually drink water at the hydration stations (did more of a swish-and-spit).  I am concerned about dehydration during the race.  Should I increase my fluids before the race?
Dr. Mason: Yes, in a 10K there is LESS risk/concern for dehydration that in half or full marathons, but you should be starting your hydration process now.  I recommend increasing you fluid intake (electrolyte/water) weeks before you run and incorporating “water stops” in to your training.  You know you are well hydrated when you have to use the bathroom 30 min after fluid intake (when you’re not running).

1st Timer: Are there any weight training exercises you recommend?
Dr. Mason: In order to answer this question in detail, I would need more information from you.  What I can say is that weight /strength training should be a part of any running program. This type of training should primarily (but not solely) focus on lower body strength and be accompanied by a good flexibility program.

Jacqui: How frequently should you increase pace or distance?
Dr. Mason: I normally recommend increasing distance then pace. But, as we mentioned in the chat, it really depends on the goals you’re looking to achieve. If you are looking to run a long distance race, you’ll probably want to focus on increasing distance, more often than pace, and doing so every 2 weeks should work well. Just remember to never increase both distance and pace at the same time.

Shalewa: What about energy enhancers like sports beans or 5 hour energy drink?  Are those bad for you?
Dr. Mason: Most “energy enhancers” are just caffeine or a caffeine derivatives and I would stay away from them as they greatly increase dehydration risk.  Good nutrition that balance carbohydrates, proteins and good fats should give you the energy you need for a 10K.  With marathons, ultra marathons, and triathlons in-competition metabolic supplements (which are very different from the energy enhancers) are often provided and can be helpful.  You’ll want to be careful and make sure that you are using them throughout your training so your body has time to adjust.

Jennifer: Hi, Dr. Mason.  I am an active person who is new to running.  After my training runs I am experiencing some discomfort/tightness in my upper and outer knees.  What can I do to help prevent this?
Dr. Mason: If these symptoms are not preventing you from doing the type/intensity of run that you want, then I would recommend working on the flexibility and strength of you quads and hamstrings.  If you are having to modify your training runs then you should see a Sports Medicine Physician.

Thanks again to those who joined me in Wednesday’s chat. I hope to see you all in Part II on June 15th! Below are the documents I referenced in the chat, please feel free to download them and keep them for reference. If you missed Part I of the chat, you can check out the chat transcript. You can also sign up to attend Part II of the chat, which is taking place on June 15th at 12pm.

Related PDF Downloads:

 

 

Are You a Runner Looking to Prepare for the Peachtree Road Race?

Peachtree Road RaceDr. Amadeus MasonThe Peachtree Road Race is right around the corner! Whether you’re a beginning runner and wondering how to get started, or a seasoned pro and have been running for years, there always new things to learn about training, nutrition, attire, and even injury prevention. As a runner, training for peak performance is key.

No matter what running category you fall into, you can join me on Wednesday, May 18 from 12 – 1:00 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat TRANSCRIPT on healthy running. Much of what we cover will be dependent upon your questions, but the chat will span a wide array of running related topics and I will be available to answer questions and discuss them, including how to best prepare for Peachtree Road Race success!

If you are interested in learning more about running benefits, prevention, and tips, register for the live chat now. Spread the word about our online runner’s chat to your fellow runners, friends and neighbors. I’ll see you on the 18th!

RUNNERS CHAT TRANSCRIPT

 

About Dr. Mason
Dr. R. Amadeus Mason is a board-certified physician at Emory Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He is the team physician for USA Track and Field and the Nike/National Scholastic Sports Foundation Track and Field and Cross Country meets, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field. Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community.