Posts Tagged ‘knee pain’

Cartilage Replacement Surgery – A Patient’s Success Story


cartilage repair
Marcus Hutchinson knows all too well about surgery and physical therapy – he has had 6 surgeries on his left knee. He has also been a physical therapist for 22 years. As a teenager, Marcus was diagnosed with osteochondritis dissecans, also known as OCD, a joint condition in which a piece of cartilage, along with a layer of the bone beneath it, comes loose from the end of a bone due to trauma or lack of blood flow to this area. Osteochondritis dissecans is most commonly found in the knee and often occurs in young men.

By the time Marcus arrived at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine in Dr. Sam Labib’s clinic in 2006, his left knee had been operated on 4 different times. Dr. Labib examined Marcus and determined he had a massive osteochondral defect in his left knee that involved his entire lateral femoral condyle, a portion of the top bone of the knee joint.

Previous doctors had told Marcus that the only option he had left was total knee replacement. Dr. Labib did not recommend knee replacement because Marcus was too young to have this procedure. Typically, a joint replacement will only last about 15-20 years so if Marcus were to have the knee replaced in his 30’s, he would probably need to have another knee replacement by his 50s.-

Dr. Labib was able to offer Marcus a unique procedure called cartilage replacement surgery. Marcus had a massive fresh allograft implantation taken from a cadaver in February 2010 to treat his osteochondral defect.

There are several surgical techniques available to treat patients with OCD.

Below are three that Dr. Labib regularly performs.

• Microfracture Surgery – In microfracture surgery, small holes are drilled into the underlying bone, creating blood clots. As the blood clots heal, new repair cartilage or fibrocartilage forms.

• Autologus Osteochondral Plug Transfer – In this procedure, the patient’s own cartilage and bone are harvested from a low-stress area of the knee and implanted into the patient’s knee in the damaged area to fill the holes and defects with healthy cartilage and bone.

• Fresh Allograft Implantation – In this surgery, the cartilage and bone are taken from a fresh cadaver that has been donated for medical use. The donated tissue, also called an allograft, is thoroughly screened and matched to the patient defect to give it the best possible chance of successful healing. The surgeon prepares the patient’s knee by removing the damaged area. The allograft is then implanted and anchored to the surrounding bone.

Marcus’ surgery was performed at Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. When asked about his experience he states, “I had such a positive experience at the hospital. Great care! Very attentive staff. Clean, professional and efficient.”

Marcus had one major goal following surgery and that was to walk and stand without pain. “I stand all day at work when seeing my patients for physical therapy. Before surgery with Dr. Labib, I had so much pain in my knee that it was affecting my job and day to day life. I feel so much more stable and pain-free now after having cartilage replacement surgery.” Marcus says he has a new perspective on what patients are experiencing after surgery and during physical therapy which has made him better at his job as a physical therapist. He is back to enjoying life with no pain and participating in low-impact activities such as swimming, cycling, and yoga.

About Dr. Sameh (Sam) A. Labib

Sam Labib, MD, is a sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeon and director of the foot and ankle service at Emory. Dr. Labib started practicing at Emory in 1999. He is an Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery.

Dr. Labib has a particular interest in problems and procedures of the knee, ankle, and foot. He is the head team physician for the athletic programs at Oglethorpe University, Spelman College, and Georgia Perimeter College. He is also an orthopaedic consultant to the Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

He has lectured both nationally and internationally at many orthopedic meetings. His research has been published in several journals, including the JBJS, Arthroscopy, Foot and Ankle International and the American Journal of Orthopedics as well as numerous video presentations and book chapters. Dr. Labib is Board Certified in orthopedic surgery with additional subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine Surgery. For the past 5 years, Dr. Labib has been nominated by his peers as one of “America’s Top Doctors” as tracked by CastleConnelly.com.

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Takeaways from Running Injury Live Chat

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Tuesday, Dr. Amadeus Mason of Emory Sports Medicine, held a live chat that answered your questions about preventing running injuries. Dr. Mason provided some great answers to some very interesting questions; from how to prevent running injuries to the ideal length of time one should consider when training for a 5k and other long distance races.  Dr. Mason also provided participants with resources on things like: knee pain and strengthening and IT Band Syndrome.

The following is a recap of the live chat, or you can check out the transcript from Dr. Mason’s Preventing Running Injuries chat.

Q. Is it better to stretch before a run? After a run? Or Both?

A. For runners stretching for flexibility, it’s better to stretch after their run, because muscles are looser and more receptive to the stretch at that time. Dr. Mason also noted that while stretching before a run doesn’t hurt, runners should keep in mind that it’s best to spend at least ¼ of the time you spend running on stretching. As an example, Dr. Mason suggests if a runner trains for an hour, it’s best to stretch for at least 15 minutes.

Q. How does a runner prevent shin splints from reoccurring and preventing the pain’s longevity?

A. Runners experiencing recurrent shin splints, or moderate to severe pain in the shin that lasts for a long period of time, should see a specialist. Make sure not to train too much, too quickly, that’s one of the most common causes of shin splints, according to Dr. Mason. If shin splints occur, it’s recommended that a runner modifies their training regimen to accommodate for pain relief. Females, who experience shin splints on a fairly regular or recurrent basis, should contact their Physician.  Continuous shin pain is a possible indication that there’s some sort of hormonal imbalance or insufficient caloric intake from a female runner’s diet.

For more information on preventing running injuries, check out Dr. Mason’s chat transcript. You can also download the resources he shared in the chat by using the links below.

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At-Home Workouts Ease Osteoarthritis Pain

Osteoarthritis at home workoutsIf you have osteoarthritis, you already know that exercise can help reduce pain and improve mobility. But did you know that working out at home with a DVD may bring even more relief?

According to a study presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), 107 people with osteoarthritis in the knee were randomized to either a DVD-based exercise group or a control group. The DVD group received a DVD-based exercise program along with verbal and hands-on exercise instructions for the first four to eight weeks. Participants in the DVD group reportedly exercised 5.3, 5.0, and 3.8 times per week at three-, six-, and 12-month intervals and had significantly greater improvement in pain and physical function than those in the control group.

While exercise did not make a significant difference in the progression of osteoarthritis, the reduction of pain and mobility among the DVD group speaks to the benefits of adding a video-based home exercise program to an existing exercise regimen.

When you exercise regularly, you strengthen the muscles around the arthritic joint, which helps decrease the pain of osteoarthritis and improve function. We suggest you do whatever keeps you on track to exercise regularly, whether it’s a video-based exercise program or exercising with a friend. But first, we recommend that you have an exercise program designed specifically for you by a physical therapist who understands osteoarthritis, to avoid injuries from overdoing it or doing the wrong exercises. The physical therapists here at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center have the experience and the expertise to develop an exercise plan that meets your unique needs and helps bring relief from osteoarthritis pain.

Do you have osteoarthritis? Has a regular home-based exercise program helped ease your pain? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

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Why Are Women Over 50 More Likely to Suffer From Knee Pain?

Knee Pain in womenIf you have knee pain, you know how debilitating it can be. And if you’re a woman, you have an even greater chance of developing knee pain after you reach 50. In a recent “Health Minute” spot, CNN’s Elizabeth Cohen spoke with Emory orthopedic physician Dr. Ken Mautner about knee pain in women over 50.

According to Dr. Mautner, knee pain in younger women tends to come from tendonitis or irritation issues around the knee. However, as women age, earlier knee injuries may lead to arthritis. The American College of Rheumatology reports that nearly two-thirds of women ages 50 and older have some degree of knee pain, and that pain is often due to osteoarthritis. And, Dr. Mautner says, women are more at risk for arthritis than men.

“We think that estrogen may have some protective effect on the cartilage of the knee,” Dr. Mautner says. That translates to a greater chance of experiencing knee pain after menopause.

Overuse injuries can cause knee pain, as can weight. If you have knee pain, your first step is to see your primary doctor to start determining the cause. He or she may then send you to a specialist. Treatment options may be as simple as taking acetaminophen or anti-inflammatory medications or using exercise as medicine, to strengthen the stabilizing muscles around the knee. Physical therapy may also be an option. When working out, avoid high-impact exercises that can further injure the knee. Low-impact exercises, like swimming, are a good alternative.

To watch Cohen’s “Health Minute,” visit: http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/health/2012/01/26/hm-womens-knees.cnn

Are you over 50 and suffering from knee pain? Would you like to learn more about knee pain treatment at Emory? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.