Posts Tagged ‘hip replacement surgery’

Takeaways from the Live Chat on Hip and Knee Replacement

joint-replacement260x200Are you or someone you know considering hip or knee replacement after living with pain for an extended time? Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have decided to undergo hip or knee replacement surgery, we answered some questions that may be helpful about the procedure and recovery time.

Thank you to everyone who participated in our live chat on Tuesday, December 13 at 12 PM EST with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Thomas Bradbury of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center where he answered questions about hip and knee replacements, new treatment options, recovery and more. We received a lot of great questions, and below are some of the highlights from this live chat. Read the full chat transcript here.

 

Question: Will I need physical therapy about a knee replacement?

Dr. Bradbury: Yes, physical therapy is much more important after knee replacement than after hip replacement. In general, the physical therapist will first help you achieve range of motion and then work on strengthening. Most people require supervised physical therapy for several weeks after surgery. After that point, they can do many of the exercises on their own.

Question: How soon will I be able to walk after a hip replacement?

Dr. Bradbury: Our goal is to have you walking within 3 hours of surgery. Early mobilization after hip replacement surgery is helpful to avoid complications like blood clots in the leg or in the lung. In general, a physical therapist will help you get out of bed and walk for the first several times. Once you demonstrate safety when walking with the therapist, you will be able to walk on your own. Most people require crutches or a walker for a period of time after surgery. Once you feel confident, you can begin walking without an assistive device.

Question: Are there different types of knee replacements?

Dr. Bradbury: Yes. Just like with cars, there are hundreds of different models. Your surgeon can explain the pros and cons of different types of replacement systems. However, the surgical technique used to implant the device is more important than the device itself.

 

Thank you again too all of our participants! View the full chat transcript and learn more about hip and knee replacements below.

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Hip and Knee Replacement Live Chat: December 13, 2016

joint-replacement260x200Are you or someone you know considering hip or knee replacement after living with pain for an extended time? Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have decided to undergo hip or knee replacement surgery, we can help answer your questions about the procedure and recovery time.

Join us on Tuesday, December 13 at 12 PM EST for a live chat with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Thomas Bradbury of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Learn more about new treatment options and whether total joint replacement surgery is right for you. Register here today.

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About Dr. Bradbury

Thomas Bradbury, MDThomas Bradbury, MD, enjoys hip and knee arthroplasty because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

Pediatric & Adult Hip Dysplasia

hip-painHip Dysplasia

The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone – that’s what the song says. But sometimes that connection doesn’t work so well, which is the result of a hip socket that is too shallow – a condition known as hip dysplasia.

The hip is the largest “ball and socket” joint in the body, held together by ligaments, tendons and a joint capsule. The hip socket is designed to hold the femur tightly to prevent it from coming out of the socket while allowing enough motion to permit a wide variety of activities. Hip dysplasia simply means that the hip is in the wrong shape, most commonly, the hip socket is too shallow and not positioned to fully cover the femoral head.

Most people with hip dysplasia are born with the condition. Many patients never have any symptoms of dysplasia as a child. However, if left untreated, many patients with hip dysplasia will progress to arthritis in their 30’s or 40’s, if not before. Hip arthritis can be a debilitating condition.

Treatment

Treatment for hip dysplasia depends on the age of the affected person and the extent of the hip damage. Infants are usually treated with a soft brace that holds the ball portion of the joint firmly in its socket for several months, helping the socket mold to the shape of the ball.

But some forms of the condition can develop later in life. Older children and adults usually require surgery to correct hip dysplasia. In mild cases, the condition can be treated arthroscopically — using tiny cameras and tools inserted through small incisions. However, if the dysplasia is more severe, the position of the hip socket can also be corrected or cuts can be made in the bone around the socket (an osteotomy) to increase its depth.

In many cases, the condition will lead to tear of the labrum and eventual arthritis because of damage to the cartilage in the socket. Total hip replacement is possible to improve pain and function in this situation.

Our providers have extensive experience in treating patients of all ages with hip dysplasia. The majority of patients with hip dysplasia are treated with surgical procedures including the periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) or “Ganz” osteotomy. This procedure, only performed by a small handful of physicians in Georgia, offers the ability to correct hip dysplasia and potentially avoid the need for a hip replacement. This exciting treatment has offered patients with hip dysplasia a hope for returning to normal activities.

Learn more about Emory’s experienced, board-certified hip specialists who provide the best possible treatment for a wide range of conditions affecting the hip. Pediatric orthopaedic patients should click here to learn more about the variety of pediatric orthopedic conditions we treat.

If you are considering a pediatric orthopaedic procedure at Emory, we encourage you to make an appointment by calling 404-778-3350 or completing our online request form by clicking the banner below.

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About Dr. Bradbury

bradburyThomas Bradbury, MD, enjoys hip and knee arthroplasty because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

Hip Replacement Surgery 101

hip replacementThe hip is one of the body’s largest and most important joints. It allows us to walk, run and jump, and bears our body’s weight and the force of the muscles of the hip and leg. If your hip has been severely damaged—by a fracture, arthritis, osteonecrosis or other conditions–common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

If other alternatives such as medications, the use of walking supports, or changes to daily activities do not effectively help your symptoms, hip replacement may be a viable solution and you should consult with your physician to learn more. Generally, hip replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure that can help you get back to enjoying everyday activities.

Takeaways from Dr. Bradbury’s Hip and Knee Replacements Chat

Thank you for participating in the online chat on Hip and Knee Replacements.  We had a lot of really great questions.  We received a few questions a couple times so we will highlight the answers to those questions here!

What is the longevity of knee replacements?

The lifespan of a knee replacement is related to the body weight and activity level of the individual who receives the replacement.  Individuals who are very active often reduce the longevity of their knee replacement because high activity can put extra stress on the implant leading to loosening of the implants from the bone or “wearing” of the parts used to replace the joint.  Being overweight increases the forces on implant and can also lead to early failure.  In general, 15 year survivorship of modern knee replacement designs used in  good candidate is around 90 percent.

Typically for younger patients,  if x-rays do not show complete loss of cartilage, “bone on bone”, I recommend waiting as long as possible to have the knee replacement surgery.  However, if there is “bone on bone” arthritis, knee replacement is the most effective treatment, but the risks of early failure are increased.

What exercises can I do for a total knee replacement?

Low impact aerobic conditioning 4-5 times per week for 4-6 weeks prior to surgery is best.  Low impact activities include swimming, elliptical, or stationary  bike.

“Prehabilitation” is rehabilitation to get your body ready for the surgery so you can recovery as quickly as possible after surgery.  Instruction during this period should be focused on strengthening the muscles around the joint.  The prehabilitation period should last for several weeks before surgery.

How long is recovery after hip/knee replacement?

It is best to think of how long it takes to reach recovery milestones –

• For hip replacement, pain is typically better than what it was prior to surgery in 2-3 weeks, normal walking typically occurs by 6-8 weeks and full recovery typically occurs within 3-4 months.

• For knee replacement, pain is typically better than what it was prior to surgery by 4-6 weeks, normal walking typically occurs by 8-10 weeks and full recovery typically occurs within 4-5 months.

Thank you again for attending the chat. I hope you found the information useful!  If you have questions or would like to schedule an appointment with an Emory Orthopedic Surgeon about hip or knee replacements please call 404-778-7777.

>>Read the full transcript from the online chat here!<<

About Dr. Bradbury

Dr. Bradbury is an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory. He specializes in hip and knee arthroplasty. He really enjoys this area of orthopaedic surgery because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

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Learn all about Hip or Knee Replacements

The decision to get a hip or knee replaced is a difficult one for many patients.  Hip and knee replacements are typically advised only when all other options have not worked for you.  If you are considering a hip or knee replacement or already have had one and want to speak to a physician, join Emory Orthopedic Surgeon, Thomas Bradbury, MD on Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at noon for an online web chat on Hip and Knee Replacements.  He will be available to answer questions such as:

• What are hip and knee replacements?
• Why have the surgery?
• Who are candidates for hip or knee replacements?
• What are the newest advances in Hip and Knee replacements?
• What is Emory’s approach on when to get knee or hip replacement surgery?
• What is the recovery after a hip or knee replacement?
• What types of exercise are suitable for someone with hip or knee replacements
• What kind of outcome can you expect?

Come prepared to ask your questions and learn more about your options!

CHAT TRANSCRIPT

About Dr. Bradbury

Thomas Bradbury, MD

Dr. Bradbury is an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory.  He specializes in hip and knee arthroplasty.  He really enjoys this area of orthopaedic surgery because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

Related Resources

Improved Joint Capsule Reconstruction Results in Fewer Dislocated Hips

James Roberson, MDDislocation of the ball from the joint has always been a possible complication following hip replacement surgery. However, at Emory Orthopaedics, a couple of developments have significantly reduced, if not eliminated, those concerns.

One of these developments is the use of alternative bearing surfaces such as highly cross-linked polyethylene—a super-wear-resistant plastic—which enables surgeons to use larger-diameter balls (femoral heads) in the hip joint. The new, thinner bearing surfaces allow for larger-diameter femoral heads, making the hip intrinsically more stable.

Another development that has significantly increased hip stability is recognition of the importance of reconstructing the ligamentous capsule of the hip joint to its appropriate anatomic position at the completion of the hip replacement. The hip is held in place by the soft tissue around the hip—the capsule, the ligaments, and the tendons. If these are not put back in an anatomic position (i.e., where they came from), the hip will have a greater chance of dislocation.

At Emory Orthopaedics, what these developments mean is that we have become more comfortable allowing our patients to resume natural activities earlier after surgery. Traditionally, patients were told they shouldn’t bend their hip more than 90 degrees, shouldn’t cross their legs, should use an elevated toilet seat, etc. for up to three months following surgery. Patients were apprehensive about dislocating their hip. But with these new materials and improved methods, for most patients we’ve stopped using those restrictions in the early post-op period. Now we feel confident telling patients that they can sit however they’d like to, bend their hips, and so on. They can go straight to enjoying their new and improved hip.

Have you had or are you going to have joint capsule reconstruction surgery? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

About Dr. Roberson

James R. Roberson, MD, chairman of the Department of Orthopaedics and professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, specializes in treating hip and knee arthritis and has performed more than 10,000 hip and knee replacements over the course of his career. Dr. Roberson has practiced at Emory since 1982.