Posts Tagged ‘foot pain’

Joint Replacement for an Active Life: Q&A with Dr. Maughon

Joints play an essential role in your body’s movements, and joint pain can negatively impact almost every facet of life. The goal of joint replacement surgery is to return patients back to their original level of activity.

From organized sports athletes to weekend warriors, Scott Maughon, MD, an Emory orthopaedic surgeon, enjoys helping athletes of all levels get back to doing what they love.

Below, he answers a few common questions about joint replacement surgery.

What is joint replacement surgery?

Dr. Maughon: Joint replacement surgery replaces the joint, or damaged or diseased parts of the joint, with man-made parts in order to relieve pain and improve mobility. Emory offers the highest in quality joint replacement surgery from our expert team of specialty fellowship-trained physicians.

What joints can be replaced with surgery?

Dr. Maughon: Almost any joint in the human body can be replaced. Some replacements are more common than others – hips, knees, and shoulders, for example. However, advances in technology and medicine have made ankle, finger, wrist and many other joint replacements more common as well.

Who is a candidate for joint replacement?

Dr. Maughon: My goal is to get my patients back to the same level of activity they enjoyed before injury or pain. Anyone who seeks to relieve pain in their joints could be a candidate for joint surgical intervention and/or replacement.

What is the recovery like after joint replacement surgery?

Dr. Maughon: Joint replacement surgery recovery time can range from several weeks to several months, depending on the patient and the joint being replaced. Emory Healthcare physicians work with each patient to develop a recovery plan based on their unique circumstances and needs.

For all joint surgery patients, there are a few general recommendations around activities. As the primary reason patients have joint replacement surgery is pain relief, the recommended post-op activities focus on those that do not put undue pressure or wear on the joint, including:

  • Swimming
  • Cycling
  • Using the Elliptical
  • Playing Doubles Tennis
  • Golf
  • Ice Skating

What inspired you to choose the sports/orthopaedic medicine specialty?

Dr. Maughon: Joint replacement helps athletes – from professional and organized sports players to weekend warriors – relieve pain and lead an active life. An athlete myself, it’s rewarding and exciting to be able to help kids and adults, and athletes of myriad abilities and levels, get back to what they enjoy doing. Moreover, being in sports medicine helps me connect to the community, making sure local youth sports have access to the appropriate medical care for any sports-related injuries.

Have there been any recent advances in joint replacement surgery?

Dr. Maughon: Arthroscopic surgery has made a significant difference in joint replacement and sports medicine. Being able to make a small incision instead of opening up major muscle groups during surgery dramatically improves recovery time for patients.

Watch Dr. Maughon discuss joint replacement in the video below.

Dr. Maughon practices at Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital in Johns Creek, Ga. To learn more about Emory Orthopaedics & Spine surgeons and treatment options available to you, visit or call 404-778-3350.


About Dr. Scott Maughon

T. Scott Maughon, MD, is an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in joint surgery and sports medicine, including ACL/MCL/PCL reconstruction, knee arthroscopy, rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability and dislocations, injuries in the aging athlete, meniscal/cartilage repair, ligament injuries, tendon injuries, joint preservation, and joint replacement surgery of the knee and shoulder. His research interests include the prevention of youth injuries in baseball for the throwing athlete, as well as proactive training and conditioning of youth and high school athletes to avoid the risk of injury.

Dr. Maughon is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and a member of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He is also Board Certified in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine. He received his medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia, completed an internship and residency in orthopaedic surgery at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta, Ga., and a sports medicine fellowship with Dr. James R. Andrews at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama.

About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital

Emory’s Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital has locations across the Atlanta metro area and offers a full range of services to diagnose, treat and repair bones, joints and connective tissue, like muscles and tendons. Emory Healthcare has the only hospital in Georgia that is dedicated to spine and joint surgery as well as non-operative spine and joint surgical interventions for physical therapy. For more information, or to schedule an appointment or an opinion, visit

Plantar Fasciitis Symptoms and Risk Factors

ankle-painAre you one of the over 2 million Americans who is suffering from plantar fasciitis this year? If you have stabbing pain in your heel right after getting out of bed or after long periods of standing or sitting you could be suffering from plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain and it is caused by inflammation in the thick band of tissue – plantar fascia – that stretches across the bottom of your feet, connecting your heel to your toes.

Plantar fasciitis affects some groups of people more than others. If you fit into any of the categories below, you may be at increased risk for plantar fasciitis:

• Middle – aged individuals: Plantar Fasciitis is most commonly experienced by people between 40-60 years of age
• Occupations that require standing: People who are on their feet a lot are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. This could include teachers, factory workers, soldiers, nurses and anyone else who stands a good portion of the day.
• Overweight individuals: Individuals who carry extra weight are at an increased risk for plantar fasciitis because the additional pounds add stress to your plantar fascia
• Active individuals: Any exercise that puts lots of stress on your heel and the attached band of tissue can lead to early-onset Plantar Fasciitis. Ballet dancers, runners and dance aerobicizers commonly develop plantar fasciitis.
• Individuals with impaired foot mechanisms: High arches, flat feet, or an irregular walking pattern can lead to incorrect weight distribution while standing. This puts additional strain on the plantar fascia in your feet and can lead to extreme heel pain.

It is important not to ignore heel pain, especially if it is so extreme that it gets in the way of your daily activities. Brushing aside plantar fasciitis may cause you to adjust the way you walk to decrease pain, which can lead to foot, knee, hip or back problems over time.

If you think you may have plantar fasciitis a good first treatment is rest! Cut back on the activities that hurt your heel. You can also try stretching your calves, toes and quads in order to reduce the pressure on the heel. If these simple remedies do not work, it is important to talk to your doctor so he or she can suggest the best treatment plan for you.

Related Links:

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis PDF

How to Prevent Plantar Fasciitis – A common Running Injury

Emory Doctors Relieve Chronic Heel Pain with New Shock Wave Therapy System – A First in Atlanta

Rami Calis, DPMAbout Rami Calis, DPM:

Rami Calis, DPM, is assistant professor in the Department of Orthopedics. He is board certified and a Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine, with an interest in sports medicine of the lower extremity and foot and ankle biomechanics. Dr. Calis sees patients at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center at Executive Park and also in Sugarloaf, at our satellite office. Dr. Calis’ professional goal is to improve patient care and quality of life for patients with foot and ankle problems. Dr. Calis began practicing at Emory in 2003.

Is Your Summer Footwear Fashionable AND Functional?

Tired feet wedge shoesWelcome to Summer! Summertime means cute shoe season for many women, but are your strappy heels and flip flops safe? Emory Orthopedic podiatrist, Rami Calis, MD gives women tips to ensure we all are wearing the best shoes for the summer.

Dr. Calis tells our friends at Fox 5 News that wedge shoes are his favorite fashionable footwear choice for women in the summer, but he notes that women should watch the pitch of the wedge to make sure it is not too high so that the body is stable when walking.

To get more ideas on how to pick functional and fashionable shoes for the summer, watch the Fox 5 news story below: