Posts Tagged ‘emory sports medicine center’

Q&A with Atlanta Falcons Team Physician

Dr. Spero Karas

Dr. Spero Karas at the Super Bowl

In addition to his duties as an orthopedic surgeon at Emory Sports Medicine Center, Dr. Spero Karas has served as the head team physician for the Atlanta Falcons since 2011. He provides sideline support and oversees the orthopedic and medical care for both the Falcons’ athletes and coaches.

Last Sunday culminated in one of the most exciting seasons in the history of Atlanta’s hometown team after making it to the Super Bowl for the second time in the team’s history.

We caught up with Dr. Karas as he returned home from Houston to talk about the season, working with the Falcons and going to the Super Bowl.

Q: How has it been working with the Falcons this year?  

A: Well, the season was a success on a number of levels. We won our division, our conference, and of course played in the Super Bowl — one of the most exciting and memorable games in Super Bowl history. From the professional side, we took great pride in the care we provided the team. We gave them early access to all of Emory’s outstanding subspecialties, as well as fulfilled all their sports medicine needs.

Q: What were some highlights on this journey to the Super Bowl?

A: Football is football in almost any context. Obviously, playing in the last game of the season does provide some unique challenges. A longer season means more opportunity for wear and tear on the body and subsequent injuries. As a medical staff, we took great care to monitor exertion and make sure the players were optimized physically in terms of nutrition, sleep and recovery.

The really unique thing about the Super Bowl is the actual pace of the game. The pregame happens an hour earlier than it does during the regular season. Halftime in the NFL regular-season is only 12 minutes, but at the Super Bowl halftime was 30 minutes long. There are also many more commercial breaks during the Super Bowl. In a medical context, this is actually advantageous because it allows more “down time” with the players and allows us to keep them hydrated. The negative is that same down time may allow the muscles to cool and the players may have a little bit more difficulty staying loose during the game.

Q: Tell me about the importance of caring for the team/the team’s health whether in the super bowl or playing on the field in general.

A: Any sports team has a unique set of important requirements for the health and safety of the player. The NBA’s requirements may be a little bit different than Major League Baseball’s or the NFL’s. But the most important thing is the health and safety of the players — whether it’s in practice, in games or even during the off-season. I think a lot of these lessons can also be transferred to collegiate, high school and youth sports as well.

Q: Leading up to the Super Bowl…how did you prepare for this exciting opportunity?

A: I don’t think there was any specific preparation required for the Super Bowl. But, we did have some unique situations in terms of player health management between the NFC championship game and the Super Bowl. We were able to pull this off with a multidisciplinary team of athletic trainers, therapists, and physicians so we had a full, healthy roster on the day of the game

Q: What a great season on the field overall! What are some of your takeaways?

A: I think a lot of people see the 16 games of the regular season and say, “Wow, that’s a really long four months.” But in reality, the football season can actually be much longer. It begins at the end of July with a month of training camp (which includes four preseason games) and then flows straight into the 16-game regular season. If you make the playoffs, your season extends by yet another month. So the main takeaway would be “It’s a long season — longer than most people think. It’s important to pace ourselves and watch our players closely for fatigue and over-exertion.”

Q: What’s one piece of advice you have for someone who aspires to become a health professional and to take care of an NFL team?

A: Well, it’s a long road — four years of college, four years of medical school, five years of residency and then a year of sports medicine fellowship. When you take care of a professional sports club, you really need to be available for the coaches, players and staff at any time. Having a great team, like we do at Emory Sports Medicine, obviously makes the job easier because you can have a number of excellent doctors helping out.

Dr. Karas is the Director of the Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program and an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University. He’s an internationally-recognized expert in the field of sports medicine, surgery of the shoulder and knee and arthroscopic surgery.  He was joined at the Super Bowl by fellow Emory Sports Medicine Center physicians Dr. Jeffrey Webb, Dr. Brandon Mines and Dr. Kyle Hammond.

Emory Healthcare Physicians Provide Care for Falcons as They Approach Super Bowl LI

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Emory Healthcare Team Physicians for the Atlanta Falcons, Spero Karas, Jeffrey Webb and Brandon Mines, are pictured here on the Georgia Dome field following the Falcon’s historic win on January 22nd against the Greenbay Packers.

The atlanta falcons are on a historic run after a monumental win in the NFC Championship Game, advancing to the Super Bowl LI.

“We’re very excited to help take the team to the next level”, says Falcons head team orthopedic physician, Spero Karas.

Emory Healthcare, the most comprehensive academic healthcare system in Atlanta, treats the Atlanta Falcons on and off the field, overseeing the orthopedic and medical care for the Falcons’ athletes and coaches.

“Each player’s health and well-being is important. So if a player is injured, we’re here to keep them safely in the game and help them reach their dream- a Super Bowl win.”
Emory Healthcare physicians will care for the team as they chase the title.

The Falcons make their second Super Bowl appearance in the team’s 51 year history, seeking their first win, this time in Houston Texas, vs. the New England Patriots, Sunday, February 5th, 2017.

Emory Sports Medicine Center

The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a global leader in providing advanced treatments for patients with sports and orthopedic injuries. Whether you’re a pro athlete or weekend warrior, you want the best possible outcome and recovery after a sports injury. We cover many specialties and conduct research to keep sports medicine moving forward.

Knee Injuries in Young Athletes Live Chat- September 28th

knee-injury-emailKnee injuries in young athletes continues to be on the rise. One of the most common sports injuries, an ACL tear, could end a young athlete’s career aspirations in sports before it even begins. Twist your knee sharply or extend it beyond its normal range during play, and you may hear the telltale “pop.” Whether your child participates in football, soccer, basketball or track, their drive for the game may be setting the stage for a serious injury.

Join us on Wednesday, Sept. 28 from noon – 1p.m. EST for an online live chat with Dr. John Xerogeanes, Chief of Sports Medicine at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and head team physician for Georgia Tech. Dr. X (as he’s known in the community) will take questions regarding how to reduce the risk of injury, specific exercises for strengthening the knee, warning signs, what to do following an ACL injury, and the rehabilitation process. Sign up for this live chat below.

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About Dr. John Xerogeanes

xerogeanes-john-wDr. Xerogeanes is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Known as Dr. “X” by his staff and patients, he is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University as well as an Adjunct Professor at Georgia State and Mercer University. Dr. X is Head Orthopaedist and Team Physician for Georgia Tech, Emory University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA. He specializes in ACL and ACL revision surgery performing over 200 of these operations each year. He is board certified in orthopaedic surgery and has his sub-specialty certification in orthopaedic sports medicine.

Emory Sports Medicine Doctors- We’ve Got Your Back Video

Emory Healthcare has begun airing a new television commercial featuring Emory Sports Medicine Center. The TV spot is set appear on a number of stations in the Atlanta area, including CBS 46 as part of its SEC Football coverage running through December, as well as Georgia PBA 30 and FOX Sports Southeast during Atlanta Hawks game coverage.

Be sure to watch the commercial on Emory Healthcare’s YouTube, Facebook or Twitter accounts, share it with friends, and discover more about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Emory Sports Medicine Center and its sports medicine doctors provide comprehensive care for athletes and active people of all ages and abilities. The Center’s physicians and athletic training teams are immersed in the world of sports medicine and hold alliances with area high school teams and youth leagues, as well as college and professional teams, including the Atlanta Hawks, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Learn more about our sports medicine specialists and take a closer look at Emory Sports Medicine Center here.

Emory Sports Medicine Physician Lands in Rio to Support Olympic Team

rio-squareWhen the 2016 Olympic Games kick off Friday, viewers will tune in to see the world’s best of the best athletes walking into Rio’s Maracana Stadium during the opening ceremony.

Among those making their way into the stadium will be Emory Healthcare sports medicine physician R. Amadeus Mason, M.D., who is helping support Team USA Track and Field.

Dr. Mason was busy this year treating four Olympic hopefuls at Emory Sports Medicine Center. Each one had pounding, over-use type injuries in either the knees, Achilles or shin. He treated them with various non-surgical measures such as biologic injections of platelets or stem cells.

“It’s exciting that these are the types of patients we see at Emory Sports Medicine on a daily basis,” he said, “and that’s the level of care anyone can expect in terms of treatment from the doctors here.”

Emory Sport Medicine Center treats people of all levels, whether they are regularly active, a weekend warrior or even a pro.

One of Dr. Mason’s patients is 400-meter hurdler, Ajoke Odumosu, a two-time Olympian from Nigeria. Ms. Odumosu, who goes by “AJ,” and now lives in Alabama, said she has complete faith in Dr. Mason for one simple reason: He’s earned it.

“I first was seen by him in 2009 after the world championships and got some guidance on managing my body,” she said. “He knows the body of the athlete. He’s always steered me in the right direction and he puts my mind at ease as well.”

For AJ, Dr. Mason helps her know how hard she can train without damage to her knees.

“I have cartilage damage in my right knee and some swelling in my left knee,” she said. “I have to be able to train not only in speed, but strength, which is pounding on the knees, with long endurance runs. I have to trust that my knees will be OK, but also be realistic and listen to my body. Some days I can train hard and feel like Superwoman; some days I have to take it easier.”

While AJ won’t be joining the team in Rio for this Olympics, she praised the treatments and guidance she sought from Dr. Mason at Emory Sports Medicine.

“I trust him very, very much,” she said. “He gives me confidence that my knees aren’t going to go out on me on a jump.”

How Much is Too Much in a Youth Sport?

Research shows sports specialization is harming younger children, and outweighs any benefit he or she might derive from laser-like focus on one youth sport.Is your child athlete playing only one youth sport, and if so, is he or she doing it year-round, with little or no monitoring about over using certain muscles?

Research shows this kind of sports specialization is harming your younger children, and greatly outweighs any benefit he or she might derive from laser-like focus on one sport.

The Emory Sports Medicine Center, a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopaedic and sports-related injuries, has been on the cutting edge of that research.

Dr. Neeru Jayanthi, M.D., of the Emory Sports Medicine Center, is a leading expert on youth sports health and is an ardent believer in kids playing organized sports. However, he believes even stronger in a simpler plan: Kids need to play. Period. Not play soccer, per se. Or baseball. Or even tennis, which is his specialty. But just play and play multiple sports.

While Jayanthi, is not at all urging parents to steer their children away from organized teams sports, his nationally acclaimed study on youth sport injuries show playing is more important to the child than playing a sport, and that once sports become the primary way a child plays, parents should monitor the number of hours the child spends on any one sport.

“With travel leagues and kid playing one sport 10 to 12 months a year, we’re seeing more over-use injuries than we would have a generation ago,” Dr. Jayanthi said. “Everyone wants the best for their child, but the best is never to let them spend hours a day, every day, doing the same activity.”

In America, particularly in warmer weather states, baseball is probably where there is more specialization, year-round focus and over-use injuries. It has gotten so bad, particularly with pitchers, that USA Baseball and Major League Baseball have teamed up to promote an educational program that urges restraint.

“When baseball is telling young baseball players to take it easy, it helps validate what we are saying,” Dr. Jayanthi said.

Dr. Jayanthi and colleagues researched 1,200 young athletes and found that kids should not spend more hours per week than his or her age playing sports. Younger children are developmentally immature and are less able to tolerate physical stress. Also, the study suggests that kids should not spend more than twice as much time playing organized sports as they do in unorganized free play.

“I love organized sports and love to see athlete’s at their best,” he said. “And that takes a lot of hard work and dedication. I get that. I believe in it. But the two concepts are not mutually exclusive to each other. In fact, I believe they go hand in hand. Want what’s best for your child, both developmentally and athletically? Follow these guidelines.”

Dr. Jayanthi leads Emory’s Tennis Medicine program and is considered one of the country’s leading experts on youth sports health, injuries, and sports training patterns, as well as an international leader in tennis medicine. He is currently the President of the International Society for Tennis Medicine and Science (STMS) and a certified USPTA teaching professional.

About Emory Sports Medicine Center

At the Emory Sports Medicine Center, our experts specialize in advanced procedures to treat and repair a wide range of sports related injuries. Recently recognized as one of the nation’s TOP 50 orthopaedics programs, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine has 6 convenient locations across metro Atlanta, as well as 6 physical therapy locations. To make an appointment to see one of our Emory sports medicine specialists, please call 404-778-3350 or complete our online appointment request form.

About Dr. Jayanthi

jayanthi-neeru-aDr. Jayanthi leads Emory’s Tennis Medicine program and is considered one of the country’s leading experts on youth sports health, injuries, and sports training patterns, as well as an international leader in tennis medicine. He is currently the President of the International Society for Tennis Medicine and Science (STMS) and a certified USPTA teaching professional. He has also been a volunteer ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) physician for 15 years, serves as a medical advisor for the WTA (Woman’s Tennis Association) Player Development Panel, and is on the commission for the International Tennis Performance Association (ITPA). He has been selected to the board of directors for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) twice, and serves as a Consultant for the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness, Aspen Institute Sport and Society Program, and Mom’s Team. Dr. Jayanthi has won multiple AMSSM Foundation Research Grants for his collaborative research on early sports specialized training and overuse injury in young athletes. He previously was the medical director of primary care sports medicine at Loyola University Chicago for 12 years where he was voted a “Top Doctor” in the Chicagoland Suburbs prior to being recruited to Emory.

5 Things You Should Be Doing Before Running the Peachtree Road Race

prr-email260x200Whether you’re running the Peachtree Road Race for the 15th time or the first, be sure to join Emory Sports Medicine’s Dr. Amadeus Mason for advice on what you should and shouldn’t be doing right now to ensure peak performance on July 4.

With less than two weeks to go before the race, Dr. Mason will give tips for avoiding injury, how to properly train, the best foods to eat, and what to do the night before the race and afterward. Join Dr. Mason on Tuesday, June 21 at 12p.m EST as he answers your questions online. Register now for our chat.

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About Dr. Amadeus Mason

mason-amadeusDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopedics and Family Medicine Department at Emory University and is board certified in Sports Medicine, with a special interest in track and field and running injuries. He is the team physician for Georgia Tech and Emory University Track & Field and Cross Country. He is also the team physician for USA Track & Field during this summer’s Olympic Games in Rio.

The Importance of High School Sports Physicals

sports-physical250x250After months of being dormant during the winter, most children who participate in sports are anxious to get back in the game as soon as warm weather arrives. While increased exercise and participation in sports outweigh the risk of injury or illness, it is crucial that every child undergo pre – participation sports physicals before beginning practice with their chosen sport. The same goes for professional athletes around the world. In the United States, pre – participation exams (PPE) are required for professional and student-athletes of all ages who want to participate in sports and/or sports camps.

But whether you’re a student athlete or a professional athlete, pre-participation sports physicals are identical.

In the winter or “off-season”, the players are usually coaching, working or playing overseas. When they re-join the Atlanta Dream, they have to undergo sports physicals, each and every year. It is important to get physicals because your health status is capable of changing during the year/off-season. For student athletes and professional athletes, it is important for medical staff to re-assess if there are any health and or orthopedic issues that have occurred in the interim.

But are sports physicals really necessary for both junior level and pro? Absolutely! A PPE provides the following prior to participation:

  • Identifies any potential life-threatening conditions, such as risk of sudden cardiac death.
  • Evaluates existing conditions that may need treatment prior to participation, or monitoring to avoid future injury.
  • Identifies any orthopedic conditions that may require physical therapy or other treatment.
  • Identifies athletes who may be at higher risk for violence, substance abuse, STDs, depression, eating disorders, anemia, asthma, hypertension, etc.
  • Reviews concussion history (if previously concussed, the PPE determines if the student-athlete is still experiencing post-concussion symptoms).

There are two portions of the physical:

  • Review of medical history: Professional athletes or student athletes and their parents need to come prepared to openly and honestly discuss all medical history. Knowing the complete history helps doctors identify conditions that might affect the student’s ability to participate and/or perform in their sport or activity. This is not a time to try and hide past injuries or medical conditions.
  • Physical exam: many schools perform partial physical exams, but if you would like a more complete physical exam, visit your family’s personal physician or pediatrician. He or she may refer your child to a Sports Medicine specialist if he thinks the child needs further evaluation for orthopedic concerns or if the student has had a history of concussions.

In addition to the two portions of a physical for student athletes, professional athletes have an additional step in the process. Professional athletes are evaluated by the team athletic trainer first. A baseline neuropsych test is done, in order to know where they should report to should one have a concussion during the season while on the court. Cardiac testing and a physical exam is done by the team physician who will go over orthopedic and medical concerns as needed. Additional testing like lab work is also required to check for any abnormalities in each player.

Sports physicals usually occur six weeks prior to the start of sports or training camp. Most student-athletes and professionals are cleared for full participation following a sports physical exam, but those who require follow-up care are generally cleared from all potential complications within the six week timeframe. Parents of student athletes are encouraged to check with their child’s school about sports physicals and if it is being provided to the athletes.

About Emory Sports Medicine Center

At the Emory Sports Medicine Center, our experts specialize in advanced procedures to treat and repair a wide range of sports related injuries. Recently recognized as one of the nation’s TOP 50 orthopaedics programs, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine has 6 convenient locations across metro Atlanta, as well as 6 physical therapy locations. To make an appointment to see one of our Emory sports medicine specialists, please call 404-778-3350 or complete our online appointment request form.

About Dr. Mines

mines-brandonDr. Brandon Mines is board certified in both family practice and sports medicine. He has focused his clinical interest on sports injuries and conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, knee, foot and ankle. He is head team physician for the Women’s National Basketball Association’s (WNBA) Atlanta Dream, Decatur High School and a team physician for NFL’s Atlanta Falcons. He is also a rotational physician for United States soccer teams.

Dr. Mines enjoys giving talks and lectures regarding the prevention of sports injuries. In fact, as an active member of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and the American Society for Sports Medicine, Dr. Mines has attended and presented at various national conferences. Through the years, he has helped all levels of athletes return to the top of their game.

Emory Soccer Medicine Doctor takes Chief Role at Mexico vs. Paraguay Game this Weekend

soccer eventEmory Healthcare sports medicine physician Oluseun Olufade, M.D., loves to talk about injury prevention and being prepared to take action should a medical emergency occur. He’s equally passionate when talking about soccer, a favorite sport he enjoyed as a child.

Combine the two topics, and Dr. Olufade becomes one of the region’s most authoritative and enthusiastic voices when it comes to soccer injuries and prevention. That’s just what the Georgia Dome needs for its upcoming May 28 soccer match between world power Mexico and Paraguay. A record, sellout crowd is likely. Mexico played at the Dome against Nigeria in 2014 and against Panama in the 2015 CONCACAF semifinals – both times in front of full houses.

Dr. Olufade is a physician in the Emory Sports Medicine Center. His role as venue medical director at the game is diverse, equal part communications, logistics facilitator and educational liaison between the referees and the two team physicians. That’s before the match begins. Once play starts on the pitch, he’ll be available to both teams to assist in any necessary medical care.

Dr. Olufade has served as team physician, both in the professional MLS ranks with Philadelphia Union, and as a member of the U.S. national team physician pool. He has covered the U.S. 17-year-old men’s national team in international matches in France and Turkey.

“As a venue medical director, the teams aren’t familiar with the city and state, the area hospitals and such,” he said. “That’s the logistical role I play. But also, I will be communicating with the referees about various injuries, particularly chest and heart injuries, because they tend to see and know head injuries and how to immediately get that player treated.”

It is important, Dr. Olufade said, to have medical directors be well versed in sports medicine and orthopedics, and also to be soccer enthusiasts.

“Soccer injuries are different than other sports,” he said. “Ankle, foot, knee and hamstrings injuries are the most common soccer injuries, but as a fan of the sport, you know what to be on the lookout for.”

The May 28 event is somewhat of a soft launch of Emory Healthcare’s Soccer Medicine Program. While not all specifics have been ironed out, Dr. Olufade said the primary goal is to have one-stop-shopping at Emory for soccer health care.

“The plan is to have a group of physicians, therapists and trainers, all who have a passion for soccer and are well trained in the specific injuries most common among soccer players,” he said. “We want to help prevent injuries through training and nutrition, and elevating sports performance, while offering comprehensive care whenever an injury does occur.”

With Atlanta’s booming soccer programs, both for youth and adults, the timing couldn’t be better, he said. The team at Emory is continuing to build its Soccer Medicine Program with plans to launch later this summer. For more information, visit EmoryHealthcare.org/ortho.

About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunDr. Olufade is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

12 Things Every Woman Should Know About Stress Fractures

stress fractureLast week, Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center physician, Oluseun Olufade, MD, attended “Ladies Night Out” at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. Ladies Night Out is an annual health event for women and provides them with a fun night of shopping, free health screenings and casual consultations with local physicians.

At the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center table, Dr. Olufade spoke with women about stress fractures and how to prevent them. Studies show that female athletes are more prone to stress fractures than male athletes. As a fun activity, attendees entered a free drawing for new running sneakers, a key item to preventing stress fractures and other orthopedic injuries. Four lucky women walked away from the event with new shoes, but we want to provide everyone with Dr. Olufade’s helpful tips. Below are 12 things every woman should know about stress fractures:

What is a stress fracture?

1. A stress fracture is a tiny crack in the bone caused by repeated stress or force, often from overuse.

What are the symptoms of a stress fracture?

2. Pain that worsens over time; limping or tenderness. Possible swelling around painful area.

What are the risk factors for stress fractures?

3. Increased amount, distance, intensity or frequency of an activity too rapidly.
4. Female gender: lower bone density, less lean body mass in the lower limbs, low-fat diet and a history of menstrual disturbance are all significant risk factors for stress fractures.
5. Poor footwear: affects the distribution of weight.
6. Sports specific: change in training pattern (i.e., introduction of hill running), change of surface (i.e., soft clay tennis court to a hard court).
7. Weak bones: from osteoporosis, medications or eating disorders.

How do I prevent stress fractures?

8. Set incremental goals: apply stress to the bone in a controlled manner to strengthen the bone over time. Try increasing distance by <10% per week to allow bones to adapt.
9. Build muscle strength in the legs to increase shock absorption and muscle fatigue.
10. Alternate activities to help prevent injury.
11. Warm up before exercising, including stretching.
12. Use the proper equipment, including footwear. Make gradual changes to shoes and running surfaces. Well-cushioned running shoes that fit well can prevent stress fractures (depending on various factors including weight and shoe durability). Runners should replace their shoes every 300-700 miles to allow adequate mid-sole cushioning.

Think you may have a stress fracture? Make an appointment with an Emory sports medicine specialist. We’ll get you up and running again!

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About Dr. Olufade

olufade-oluseunOluseun Olufade, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine . He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

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