Posts Tagged ‘Emory Orthopaedics’

Becker’s Recognizes Emory Healthcare as Top Performer in Orthopedics

ortho-story-squareEmory Healthcare’s orthopedic programs received top recognition in two nationwide lists released this Fall in Becker’s Hospital Review.

In its annual list, “100 Hospitals with Great Orthopedic Programs 2016,” Becker’s named Emory among the national leaders in orthopedic care. Specifically, Becker’s recognized Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Emory University Hospital and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital. The only other hospital in Georgia to make the list was University Hospital in Augusta, Ga.

To develop the list, the Becker’s Hospital Review editorial team examined several rankings and awards for orthopedic care, including U.S. News & World Report, Joint Commission certification and Magnet nursing accreditation.

In a separate list, Becker’s recognized Emory University Hospital, which includes Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, as one of 36 hospitals in the U.S. to have the lowest 30-day readmission rates for hip and knee replacement surgery. The list is based on data supplied by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services.

All the hospitals on the list have a readmission rate for hip and knee replacement of 3.4 or lower. The national average readmission rate for those procedures is 4.6. Emory’s rate was 3.4.

“For nearly a decade our team has worked diligently to implement a patient- and family-centered care model, a culture of safety, and a commitment to continuous quality improvement,” said Scott D. Boden, MD, the Director of the Musculoskeletal Center and CMO/CQO of the Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. “It’s rewarding to see these efforts on behalf of our patients now recognized on a national platform.”

Scoliosis Spine Surgery- Patient Success Story

Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine with multiple symptoms. Surgical treatment of scoliosis usually requires a spinal fusion. About 5 years ago, I had back surgery with John Rhee, MD at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Rhee removed pressure off of nerves in my back and joined two back bones together. Following that procedure, everything was fine. I knew at the time that I had a scoliosis that might eventually need to be addressed, but the decision was made to do the smallest operation first and just take care of the area that was causing the pain. Low and behold, the scoliosis did eventually catch up with me, and I started to experience sciatic pain from my buttock to ankle several times throughout the day. I was working, but I was taking medications to mask the pain just so I could go to work. I could not do anything else because I did not want to agitate my back.

Prior to suggesting surgery, Dr. Rhee recommended trying to rehab my back to see if a nonoperative approach would help. However, after trying, it became obvious that nonoperative treatment was not working, and that surgery would be the best option for me. About a month and half before surgery I was given exercises to complete which would end up helping me after surgery. I thought this was unique and the medical team was right, because I would not be able to rehab immediately post-surgery. I was preparing for after surgery before I even went into surgery.

During surgery, my wife was in the waiting room and she was updated on my status by the hour. Due to my severe scoliosis, it was a major fusion operation involving multiple levels from the thoracic spine down to the sacrum. However, the Orthopaedics and Spine team made her feel very comfortable. I was in the hospital for a total of 2 days, came home on the 3rd day and started my recovery. From Dr. Rhee’s nurse, Betty Dundee, to the staff, my experience was great!

Prior to me going to Dr. Rhee, I had a fraternity brother, who is an Orthopedic surgeon, take a look at my x-ray before surgery and he viewed it after surgery as well. My friend could not believe what a great job Dr. Rhee did. He said “You got a good guy!”. All of my friends call me wonder man because they can’t believe I can do what I’m doing based on seeing me beforehand. For example, my wife and another person watched me walk down the pavement to make sure I had proper form, and I did! Dr. Rhee did a great job. Even though I needed a major operation, the surgery seemed so easy and well done. I cannot see someone not going through surgery because I found it so simple. I’m very pleased and I’m on my feet once again.

A Note From Dr. Rhee About Scoliosis and Spine Surgery

Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that can lead to nerve compression, pain, and if severe enough, deformity. Surgical treatment of scoliosis usually requires a spinal fusion. Depending on the magnitude of the scoliosis, multiple levels in the spine may require fusion, which can make it a major operation. Nevertheless, when properly executed, surgery for scoliosis is associated with excellent outcomes.

About Dr. Rhee

Dr. John Rhee, Orthopedist AtlantaSpecializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis), and surgery for spinal tumors, Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies.  He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery.  In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings.   Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and book chapters, and he has received numerous awards and honors.  He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of numerous books on spine surgery techniques.

Chondrosarcoma Patient Story: “I can now walk unaided and enjoy time with my family.”

skiiing patient storyI noticed something was “not right” with my right leg when I couldn’t sit crisscross-applesauce-style on the floor during my daughter’s music class. The tendon near my groin area was very tight and sore. Pilates exercises were difficult to complete and my left leg responded better than my right during daily activities. At the time, I thought maybe the pain was a sign of aging and simply that I needed more exercise and stretching. I continued to go about my daily life, living with pain that was sporadic and more of an ache at that point.

In March 2009, I was on a spring break skiing trip with my family when I noticed my leg felt “wobbly” during the downhill runs. I couldn’t control my right leg well and immediately knew something was wrong, so I stopped skiing. The next day, we went horseback riding and as I swung my leg up and around to get on the horse, there was a sharp stabbing pain at the top of my thigh. That was my big “ah-ha” moment. I knew that once I returned home I needed to seek medical attention, especially since the bursts of pain continued on and off throughout the rest of my trip. When I got home, I visited my primary care doctor who ordered X-rays, MRI and bone scan. After reviewing my results, my primary care doctor referred me to Dr. David Monson, an orthopaedic oncology surgeon at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Monson met with me and explained I had Chondrosarcoma of the hip, which is a rare type of cancerous bone tumor.

Getting the news that it was cancer was startling and left me feeling quite shocked, especially after thinking the pain was just something having to do with the typical aging process. I was expecting them to find arthritis, not cancer. What made me most nervous was the type of cancer I had and its location in my hip. During the first visit with Dr. Monson that day, he walked me and my family through the different treatment options and then recommended I take some time to compare options. Like most people would, I went straight to the internet and began researching my cancer and different options. What I found scared me – up until five years ago, most tumors of the pelvis were surgically treated through amputation. This made me extremely anxious. I didn’t want to lose my leg.

During this tough decision-making process, Dr. Monson made me feel comfortable and at peace. He was extremely knowledgeable, very caring and direct. After reviewing my options with Dr. Monson, I felt sure he was the guy to do my surgery, so I made my decision and moved forward. Andre Roy, Dr. Monson’s Nurse Practitioner, was available any time I called and provided answers to my multitude of questions. I felt very cared for and looked after at Emory, and I was impressed with the office staff every time I came in for an appointment.

In the end, we decided that during the surgery to remove my tumor, we would reconstruct my hip using a saddle prosthesis. I was pleased that Dr. Monson knew how to perform this procedure comforted that is one of the few doctors that knows how to place such a prosthetic.

Following my surgery in November of 2009, I went through extensive physical therapy. Today I am walking really well and keeping up with my active teenage daughter. My range of motion is limited so minor adjustments have been made in my daily life to stay safe and comfortable. I’m thankful to be able to do all the things that I can do now, and continue enjoying life!

A note from Dr. David Monson

Bone tumors of the pelvis are uncommon and their surgical management depends on multiple factors, including tumor size, location and whether the tumor is benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These factors determine whether a limb-saving surgery is possible or not and if the losses associated with surgery may result in a non-functioning extremity.

Three main factors to consider with pelvis surgery relate to stability of the hip after surgery, and function of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A minimum of two out of three must remain intact for the lower limb to be worth saving. Fortunately for Mrs. Powers, both her sciatic and femoral nerves were able to be preserved and we were able to restore stability of her right hip with a saddle prosthesis.

Options for reconstruction of the hip joint after removal of pelvic bone tumors may include prosthesis such as a saddle, a cadaveric bone transplant (allograft) or sometimes no reconstruction at all. Each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages which makes selecting the right treatment for each individual patient unique based upon the factors above.

At Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, our goal is to always offer patients with what we expect to be the most functional, yet durable surgical reconstruction possible without compromising the long term likelihood of cure. These surgeries are often quite complex and can take as long as 6-8 hours or longer. Complications can occur and the recovery time after surgery takes anywhere from six months to a year. We want patients to be fully educated before heading into a surgery this complex.

Mrs. Powers has worked extremely hard with her physiotherapy and has achieved an excellent functional outcome. We are incredibly proud of her and most grateful that there has been no recurrence of her tumor!

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Emory Bone Cancer Patient Story: “I have full motion in my arm again!”

ms k11-27 2msk 11-27It happened so quickly. One day I was working out and noticed a bulge in my left shoulder but I didn’t think much of it, in fact, I thought maybe my muscles were growing! But my concern grew as the lump got larger. I made a random visit to the chiropractor and during the visit he moved my right arm across my body. When he went to move my left arm across my body, it was impossible; motion of my left arm was completely restricted. The chiropractor knew something was not right and referred me to a primary care physician for an X-ray. I was scared and didn’t want to face reality that this inability to move my arm could be something serious. I wasn’t in pain – the ball on my shoulder wasn’t bothering me or affecting my life – but it was critical that I figure out what it was.

On September 5, 2013, the news was broken to me that I had a tumor in my left shoulder. It was on that day that I was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma, the most common type of bone cancer. This cancer begins in the bone compared to other cancers that begin somewhere else in the body and spread to bone. Immediately my parents started making calls, knocking on neighbors’ doors and doing research in hopes of finding the best doctor and treatment in the area for my diagnosis. My parents were told that an oncology surgeon, Dr. David Monson at Emory Orthopedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, GA, was the best in the business. That’s when I knew I was going to be in good hands. Dr. Monson’s exceptional reputation was my definition of a rock star surgeon!

The first step in this treatment journey was to make an appointment for an MRI, CT scan and biopsy. Before the tests, my medical oncology team prepped me that chemotherapy and radiation would mostly likely be needed for the next 6 months of my life. Thankfully, the MRI and CT scan showed the cancer had not spread to anywhere else in my body. Then the biopsy results came in and revealed that the bulge was a low grade tumor, which meant no chemotherapy or radiation was needed, rather surgery and physical therapy.

I was informed that the surgery would be to remove six inches of bone from my arm and replace it with a cadaver. I was relieved and extremely grateful that this treatment option wouldn’t turn my whole life upside down, but there were still concerns. I didn’t know if I would ever get back full motion in my arm or be able to get my arm over my head again. I didn’t know if I would look the same after surgery with this “new” arm.

Less than twenty days from the date of my diagnosis, on September 23, 2013, I had surgery. I remained hospitalized for three days following the surgery and then began my healing journey. I couldn’t return to work for four weeks and went through six months of physical therapy. I am incredibly lucky to have a support group of family and friends that surrounded me and picked me up when I was down.  They took care of me and gave me the love and support I needed to get through what could have been a devastating time.  My parents stayed with me overnight while I was in the hospital, I even stayed with my sister and brother in law for a week after surgery and my sister filled the room I stayed in with all of the flowers I received.  I am extremely grateful to have every one of them in my life. The team at Emory made my journey to recovery seamless. I especially loved my physical therapist. Her excitement every session made me excited! She looked at my circumstances as a challenge, but together we pushed through. In fact, because my recovery went so well – something she had never seen with my type of surgery before – she ended up using it as a case study.

Today, my life is mostly back to normal. I have full motion in my left arm again, but my arm is still restricted when it comes to putting weight on it. It is going to take some time for the new bone to fully fuse with my natural bone, so right now I cannot hold more than five pounds with my left hand. I am aware and mindful of the activity and stress I place on my new arm, but I do not want to do anything that could potentially damage it, but thankfully I am able to work out regularly and both my work and social life are as normal as they can be!

A Note From Dr. Monson
Ms. Peterson was fortunate in that her osteosarcoma was low grade and required surgery alone for resection and reconstruction. There was no need for chemotherapy as there is in high grade osteosarcomas. There are only about 50 of these tumor types diagnosed a year in the entire United States. Our goal was to provide Ms. Peterson with as functional a reconstruction as possible and thus we chose to do so with a cadaver bone transplant of the proximal humerus where we could perform a direct rotator cuff repair. Repair of the shaft of the cadaver to the patient’s own remaining humerus bone distally was performed with plates and screws, much like that performed in fracture repair surgery. Reconstruction with an artificial prosthesis is actually an easier procedure technically; however the inability to reestablish reliable rotator cuff function often leads to lesser function of the shoulder. Although no reconstruction option can be declared a permanent solution, the use of the cadaver transplant burns no bridges and keeps options open for Ms. Peterson should she require more surgery in the future. She has excelled with her physical therapy and her full restoration of motion reflects strongly on her will and determination.

About Dr. Monson

monson-david-kDavid Monson, MD, and his partners at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center have the ONLY multidisciplinary musculoskeletal oncology service in Georgia that serves both children and adults. His focus is on rare tumors, sarcomas of the bone (2,500 cases a year in the U.S.) and soft tissue (10,000 cases a year in the U.S.) as well as other uncommon benign bone and soft tissue tumors. He also treats metastatic disease to the bone from other primary malignancies and often performs complex reconstructive procedures for these disorders not available in the community. The efforts of his practice also extend to complex skeletal reconstructions that may arise from failed orthopaedic procedures performed elsewhere.

He is only one of two fellowship-trained orthopaedic oncologists in the state of Georgia (the other is his partner, Dr. Shervin Oskouei) that concentrates his practice within his subspecialty. He also performs total hip and total knee replacements, specifically more difficult primary replacements or revisions that may require the skills developed within his practice of musculoskeletal oncology.

Extending Nationally-ranked Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine Care

MSKmapRecently, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital was recognized nationally as a top hospital in the country for orthopaedics*, but did you know that we have more than one location? In fact, Emory offers comprehensive orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine care at multiple locations across Atlanta:

Clinic Locations:
★ Atlanta (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Dunwoody (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Johns Creek
★ Sugarloaf
★ Tucker

Hospital Locations:

  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital
  • Emory University Hospital Midtown
  • Emory Johns Creek Hospital

Physical Therapy Locations:

  • Atlanta (3 different locations)
  • Dunwoody
  • Johns Creek
  • Sugarloaf
  • Tucker

Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital is Georgia’s first and only hospital designated primarily to spine and joint replacement surgery. Each of our orthopaedic physicians has received years of specific training to specialize in his or her area of expertise and all use progressive treatment approaches, many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine.

In additional to expanding our geographic reach over the last few years, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has continuously reinvested resources and funding back into its existing facilities to improve research, technology and care delivery models, ensuring that the patient and family experience is unmatched. This commitment to delivering supreme care has resulted in our patients consistently giving us some of the highest patient satisfaction scores in the country**.

To see an Emory orthopaedic, sports medicine or spine specialist at one of our convenient locations, call 404-778-3350 today. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours.

*Ranked by U.S. News & World Report

** Ranked by Press Ganey

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Related Resources:
Orthopaedics at Emory Healthcare

Emory Spine Patient Story: “I wanted to walk down my long driveway – I can now.”

By Sara Dollar, Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center patient

Scoliosis PatientAt the age of 12, I started seeing a chiropractor. In my early teenage years, I was diagnosed with severe scoliosis. Doctors told me that by the time I reached the age of 45, I might not be able to breathe if the scoliosis got bad enough. My spine was shaped like a perfect “S.” I had my first surgery in 1977, followed by several more surgeries. Surgery after surgery left me in excruciating pain. I lived my life, but because my spine was stuck in a bad position, I walked crooked, I couldn’t stand up straight, I couldn’t walk my dogs, and I couldn’t walk five feet without my back spasming. I had become like a hermit crab.

In September 2014, I was referred to John M. Rhee, MD, a spinal surgeon at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center, because I had a very delicate problem that my former surgeons could not handle. Dr. Rhee explained to me what could be done, and I was so excited that I wanted to have surgery on the same day as my office visit! But because my problem was very severe, and the required surgery would be complex, Dr. Rhee asked me to go home and discuss this with my family. I was so grateful for this! After much thought, I decided to have surgery – a lumbar osteotomy, which is a major operation done only at highly- specialized spine centers, like Emory, because of its complexity.

I had done so much research on Emory and Dr. Rhee that even before my first scheduled appointment I knew that I had made the right decision. I felt comfortable. Before I went into surgery, I made some goals that I wanted to attain after my procedures: mainly, I just wanted to live without pain. I am happy to say that Dr. Rhee helped me achieve this!

I had two planned surgeries to correct my severe scoliosis and kyphosis. They were done on January 22 and 23, 2015. Compression on the nerves had to be relieved along with fusion and correction of the deformed areas of the spine. My previous hardware had to be removed and repositioned properly, and a wedge of bone was removed from one of my vertebrae in order to realign my spine so I could stand up straight again. This was a major procedure because I had had multiple prior surgeries that left my spine severely deformed.

At my six week checkup, I was walking without any assistance from a cane, walker or person. I think I surprised Dr. Rhee with how well I was doing and how quickly I had recovered.

While I am still healing, I am not in any pain and am accomplishing all of my goals. I wanted to walk down my long driveway – I can now. I wanted to be able to walk down the beach – I can now. I wanted the freedom of walking into a store to grab some milk and bread without needing or using a shopping cart – I can now. When the time comes, I want to run after my future grandchildren, and because of my surgery, I believe I will be able to.

My advice to others considering spine surgery; do not be afraid, stop living in pain, quit suffering and get your good quality of life back. Surgery is not the answer for everyone, but if it is, I would not trust anyone other than the renowned spine surgeons at Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Thanks to them, I am living well and attaining my goals.

About Dr. Rhee

John Rhee, MDJohn M. Rhee, MD, is a Spinal Surgeon and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery specializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis) and surgery for spinal tumors. Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies. He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery. In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings. Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and books, and he has received numerous awards and honors. He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of major textbooks on spine surgery techniques.

Emory Expansion Update: Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine is On the Move

ExpansionTo provide a better patient care experience, two of our Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine clinics in Johns Creek and Duluth are combining. The combined practice will relocate to 6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 302, Johns Creek, GA 30097 and begin seeing patients in the new location on Tuesday, March 17, 2015.

Below is a list of all of physicians seeing patients in the new clinic location.

If you have an appointment with any of the doctors listed above and have a question regarding where your appointment will be, please call us at 404-778-3350.

Also, Emory Physical Therapy has expanded to a new location in Johns Creek. The practice, located at 6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 316, Johns Creek, GA 30097, opened its doors on Monday, March 2, 2015.

If you would like to make an appointment with Emory Physical Therapy at Johns Creek and have a question, please call 404-778-6447.

Emory Spine Center Patient: “Dr. Ananthakrishnan is a miracle worker.”

By Renee Godley, patient at Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine Center

Emory Orthopedics PatientIn 1969, I had scoliosis surgery. During this surgery, my spine was fused and a Harington Rod was attached to the muscles in my spine. After the surgery, I was bedridden for six months and in a body casts for a total of nine months. I recovered well and learned how to live with my limitations.

In 1990, I started to suffer from lower back pain. I visited Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine Center, in Atlanta, Georgia and I was informed that I needed to have additional surgery. The wear and tear on my lower three discs had progressed to the point that I would need to have them replaced and fused within 10 years. I said no immediately because I knew the process, I had a three year old daughter at home and I would again, be bedridden for three months and in a body cast that extended down to my right knee. I was unwilling to go through the process a second time. Fear lead me to that decision.

From 2007 until 2012 I saw a pain management orthopedist, which helped me to numb the pain. Then I was advised to see Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine physician, Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MD. Fear once again took hold of me. I had done research and quickly realized I was suffering from Flat Back Syndrome. I read information about the surgeries (two, for a total of at least 12 hours), and started to panic. I finally reached the point where the pain was too much and I just couldn’t take it anymore. I did not want to have surgery and I did not know what to do.

My life had become very restrictive. I could no longer go out to eat or even sit on the living room couch for an extended period of time, rather I had to lie down to lessen the pressure on my spine. I loved attending Georgia football games and could no longer attend any games, the car ride, walk to the stadium and sitting in the stands were beyond my capabilities. I just could not go anymore. My husband wanted to go to the movies, and you guessed it, I could not; I couldn’t do anything.

After much fear, unbearable pain and many days and nights spent crying, my life would soon change. I was referred to Emory Spine Center to see Dr. Ananthakrishnan (Doctor A). Doctor A examined me and ran numerous tests and the diagnosis was, as predicted, Flat Back Syndrome. Although I did not want to have the surgeries, I had no choice. I was scheduled for surgery in December of 2012. For thirty days I was taken off my medications (anti-inflammatories) and realized just how disabled I had become. I was immobile, I couldn’t walk, much less do anything.

On, December 7, 2012, I had surgery at Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital with Dr. Ananthakrishnan that included three replacement discs. A second surgery was held on December 11, 2012 where two rods and 16 one inch titanium screws were placed in my back.

Thanks to Dr. Ananthakrishnan, for the first time in 30 years, I had no pain in my back! This is the best feeling that I’ve felt since I met my husband and got married. Dr. A is a miracle worker. In the two years since my surgery I have begun to walk for exercise, averaging approximately five miles of exercise per day. I went from not walking at all to averaging over 70,000 steps per week.

Everyone I see can’t believe how good I look. I stand straight. I am no longer hunched over. When someone tells me they are experiencing back pain, the first thing I ask them is, “Have you gone to Emory yet?” I would not have the quality of life I have today without Dr. Ananthakrishnan.

A note from Dr. Dheera Ananthakrishnan

I vividly remember the first day that I met Mrs. Godley. She was still so traumatized from her scoliosis surgery all those years ago! I was very worried that she would have difficulty coping with such a large revision surgery. Was I ever wrong! She sailed through two really large surgeries, and has been a textbook patient, inspiring others to follow in her footsteps.

One of the great joys of performing surgery is to see how life-altering it can be for patients who have lived with disability and pain for a long time. Mrs. Godley embodies this for me. It has been my great pleasure to know her and care for her. Now the only tears that are shed during our visits are tears of joy.

About Dr. Ananthakrishnan

Dheera Ananthakrishnan, MDDheera Ananthakrishnan, MD, trained with one of the pioneers of scoliosis surgery, Dr. David Bradford, at the University of California at San Francisco. After completion of her fellowship, Dr. Ananthakrishnan practiced orthopedic and spine surgery for over three years at the University of Washington in Seattle. In 2007, she left Seattle to work with Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. She then worked as a volunteer consultant at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, before starting her position at Emory University. She maintains an interest in developing-world orthopedics through her non-profit, Orthopaedic Link, and is currently involved in projects in the Philippines, Nepal, and Bulgaria.

Dr. Ananthakrishnan’s practice focuses on adult scoliosis and degenerative conditions. She also treats adolescent spinal disorders as well as tumors and cervical conditions. She has been at the Emory Orthopaedic and Spine Center since 2007.

Successful Grand Opening for Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine at Dunwoody

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine at Dunwoody

Photo from grand opening event at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine’s new Dunwoody location. A big thanks to Dunwoody Mayor, Mike Davis, Blessed Trinity High School, Emory at Dunwoody Family Practice, Jerry’s Famous Catering, St. Pius X Catholic High School, William J. Mulcahy, Synergy Sports Wellness Institute and all the wonderful people that shared the day with us. We are grateful.

On January 28, 2015, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine successfully hosted a grand opening event to officially open its doors to their new Dunwoody location.

The opening reception was an opportunity for local businesses and members of the Dunwoody community to tour the facility and meet with Emory physicians, including the newest physician, Lee Kneer, MD, assistant professor in the Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Medicine. Dr. Kneer specializes in non-surgical treatments, ultrasound, rehabilitation and sport medicine.

In an effort to meet the increasing demands for orthopaedic care, Emory Orthopaedics continues to expand its services for the convenience of patient access across Metro Atlanta. The Dunwoody clinic offers a full range of treatments for orthopaedic conditions and injuries including sports medicine, hand and upper extremities, foot and ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee and hip, spinal care, and concussions. It also offers X-ray, physical therapy and an ambulatory surgery center.

“The needs of our patients always come first,” says Scott Boden, MD, director of the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Center. “We are excited to offer top-notch physicians and convenient locations for high-level, specialized care that address the unique needs of our orthopaedic and spine patients.”

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine has locations in Atlanta, Duluth, Johns Creek, Tucker and now Dunwoody. All Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physicians bring extensive training and experience.

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine at Dunwoody is located at 4555 North Shallowford Road, Atlanta, GA 30338.

For more information on all Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine clinic, please call 404-778-3350. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours at 404-778-3350.

Emory Expansion Update: Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine is On the Move

ExpansionTo provide a better patient care experience and align demand with available capacity, the orthopaedic doctors and physical therapy clinic currently located at Perimeter are relocating to Dunwoody. The new space will be more inviting for patients, include an outpatient ambulatory surgery center and also be more accommodating to our physicians’ needs.

Thursday, June 26th will be the last day in the Perimeter Clinic, currently located at 875 Johnson Ferry Road. Our new clinic located at 4555 North Shallowford Road in Dunwoody will begin seeing patients on Tuesday, July 1st. If you have an appointment with any of the doctors below and have a question regarding where your appointment will be, please call us at 404-778-3350.

If you have an appointment with Emory Physical Therapy and have a question, please call 404-778-6031.