Posts Tagged ‘dr. mason’

10 Tips for a Healthy Peachtree Road Race Run

Peachtree Road RaceRunning is great exercise for your health and your mind. Follow the tips below to ensure that you are in top form on race day. Have a safe and fun Peachtree Road Race!

  1. Hydrate yourself frequently before, during and after running in order to loosen muscles.
  2. Warm up and/or stretch before the race to loosen tight muscles.
  3. Run slower in hot weather in order to avoid heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion.
  4. Use hand lotion on feet and areas of chafing to prevent skin damage and blisters.
  5. Don’t forget to use sunscreen to protect against sunburn.
  6. Wear sunglasses to reduce glare and avoid tripping.
  7. When your energy is gone, imagine someone running in front of you and pulling you forward.
  8. Get your rest! Sleep one extra minute each night for every mile you run. For example, if you run 30 miles a week, sleep 30 additional minutes each night.
  9. Change soggy, sweaty socks soon after the run and stuff shoes with newspaper to avoid moisture buildup.
  10. Pay attention to your body! If you experience pain during or after the race and it does not go away, something may be wrong. Schedule an appointment with an Emory Sports Medicine physician.

Related Running Resources:

Still looking for more tips? Check out the transcripts from a few of our recent MD chats on running using the links below:

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part I

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part II

More Running Questions Answered

More Runners’ Chat Questions Answered

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Wednesday, I held a live chat on the topic of running to help those preparing for the Peachtree Road Race and to educate runners of all skill levels on injury prevention, nutrition, and technique. It was my first so-called “live chat,” so I really didn’t know what to expect. The questions that I received in yesterday’s chat were fantastic. Not only do I feel like I got to help the 50+ people who joined me in the chatroom, but I myself was able to learn something in the process. Typically when I chat with people who have questions for me, they are my patients, in a one-on-one setting. This really gives me the time to feel them out and learn about them as individuals. Wednesday, I was charged with a new and equally inspiring and fulfilling task– to educate a group, without being able to see them in person or learn about them before we talked. It was an extremely eye opening experience.

I want to thank those who joined me Wednesday for a wonderful chat. It was so successful, in fact, that I didn’t get a chance to answer each and every question. For those who were in the room, I promised to follow up with a blog to answer all questions that were unaddressed, and I have done so below. At the bottom of this blog post, you will also find the documents I mentioned in the chat for your further reference. As an added bonus, to make sure everyone gets a chance to discuss the topic of running and all of its facets with me, we will be holding the next live chat on running on June 15th. PART II CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Larry: I ran a marathon with IT band issues.  What can I do to prevent it in the future?
Dr. Mason: Larry, to prevent IT band problems, you should strive to work on increased flexibility. I’d advise that you watch the rate at which you increase your mileage/distance and start training early enough to allow for a slow and steady progress with sufficient recovery times between training sessions.

Shirley: Dr. Mason, Why does my back hurt periodically when I am tired while running?  Should I bend over to stretch?  I am a beginner.
Dr. Mason: I can’t speak to your specific medical circumstances without seeing you in-person, but generally speaking, oftentimes people experience back pain while running due to hamstring tightness. For these patients, I advise that they avoid the typical stretch that involves bending over, and instead focus on extension type exercises.

M. White: How do I know when it is time for new running shoes?  This will be my first time running longer than a 5k.
Dr. Mason: My recommended guidelines for footwear are if you run more than 20 – 25 miles a week you should change you shoes every 3 – 4months ( ~300 miles); if you run less than 20 miles a week can change shoes twice a year.

Sylvia: Hi. Dr. Mason. Is there any particular type of shoe that you would recommend as best for protecting against injuries; Knees, ankles, shin splints, etc.?
Dr. Mason: Studies have shown that shoe comfort is a more important factor in preventing injury than the actual type of shoe.  I would recommend you get evaluated at your local running store to determine what class of running should would be best for you. After doing that, go ahead and pick the most comfortable one in that class.

Judy: I’m used to walking about 3 miles about 3 times a week.  I am signed for the Peachtree.  Obviously I will be walking it.  I have 6 weeks to step up my training.  How would you suggest I proceed to get to 6 miles in time for the race?  Thanks.
Dr. Mason: Good question, Judy. I’d recommend adding about ½ mile to your distance each week.

Steve: Dr. Mason, I have a chronic hamstring issue.  What can I do to help the issue?  What type of Dr. or therapist should I seek out for help?
Dr. Mason: I would recommend you see a physician with sports medicine training.

M. White: I have been training for a 5k (took 30min) – which I ran a couple of weekends ago.  To train for the Peachtree what should I do?  Increase distance or time?
Dr. Mason: My answer here depends on whether you want to run the Peachtree for time or just for fun.  Since this race is twice the distance of a 5k,  I would start out increasing your distance (1/2 mile a week. Once you get to 5 miles then you can start increasing your pace.

Mac: What are some good lower-fat proteins for vegetarian novice runners?
Dr. Mason: As a vegetarian you should be concerned about getting in GOOD fats as opposed to LOW fat.  To that end eating things like beans, nuts and/or soy would be good choices.

Dawn: When I ran the Peachtree last year, I found it difficult to actually drink water at the hydration stations (did more of a swish-and-spit).  I am concerned about dehydration during the race.  Should I increase my fluids before the race?
Dr. Mason: Yes, in a 10K there is LESS risk/concern for dehydration that in half or full marathons, but you should be starting your hydration process now.  I recommend increasing you fluid intake (electrolyte/water) weeks before you run and incorporating “water stops” in to your training.  You know you are well hydrated when you have to use the bathroom 30 min after fluid intake (when you’re not running).

1st Timer: Are there any weight training exercises you recommend?
Dr. Mason: In order to answer this question in detail, I would need more information from you.  What I can say is that weight /strength training should be a part of any running program. This type of training should primarily (but not solely) focus on lower body strength and be accompanied by a good flexibility program.

Jacqui: How frequently should you increase pace or distance?
Dr. Mason: I normally recommend increasing distance then pace. But, as we mentioned in the chat, it really depends on the goals you’re looking to achieve. If you are looking to run a long distance race, you’ll probably want to focus on increasing distance, more often than pace, and doing so every 2 weeks should work well. Just remember to never increase both distance and pace at the same time.

Shalewa: What about energy enhancers like sports beans or 5 hour energy drink?  Are those bad for you?
Dr. Mason: Most “energy enhancers” are just caffeine or a caffeine derivatives and I would stay away from them as they greatly increase dehydration risk.  Good nutrition that balance carbohydrates, proteins and good fats should give you the energy you need for a 10K.  With marathons, ultra marathons, and triathlons in-competition metabolic supplements (which are very different from the energy enhancers) are often provided and can be helpful.  You’ll want to be careful and make sure that you are using them throughout your training so your body has time to adjust.

Jennifer: Hi, Dr. Mason.  I am an active person who is new to running.  After my training runs I am experiencing some discomfort/tightness in my upper and outer knees.  What can I do to help prevent this?
Dr. Mason: If these symptoms are not preventing you from doing the type/intensity of run that you want, then I would recommend working on the flexibility and strength of you quads and hamstrings.  If you are having to modify your training runs then you should see a Sports Medicine Physician.

Thanks again to those who joined me in Wednesday’s chat. I hope to see you all in Part II on June 15th! Below are the documents I referenced in the chat, please feel free to download them and keep them for reference. If you missed Part I of the chat, you can check out the chat transcript. You can also sign up to attend Part II of the chat, which is taking place on June 15th at 12pm.

Related PDF Downloads:

 

 

Are You a Runner Looking to Prepare for the Peachtree Road Race?

Peachtree Road RaceDr. Amadeus MasonThe Peachtree Road Race is right around the corner! Whether you’re a beginning runner and wondering how to get started, or a seasoned pro and have been running for years, there always new things to learn about training, nutrition, attire, and even injury prevention. As a runner, training for peak performance is key.

No matter what running category you fall into, you can join me on Wednesday, May 18 from 12 – 1:00 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat TRANSCRIPT on healthy running. Much of what we cover will be dependent upon your questions, but the chat will span a wide array of running related topics and I will be available to answer questions and discuss them, including how to best prepare for Peachtree Road Race success!

If you are interested in learning more about running benefits, prevention, and tips, register for the live chat now. Spread the word about our online runner’s chat to your fellow runners, friends and neighbors. I’ll see you on the 18th!

RUNNERS CHAT TRANSCRIPT

 

About Dr. Mason
Dr. R. Amadeus Mason is a board-certified physician at Emory Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He is the team physician for USA Track and Field and the Nike/National Scholastic Sports Foundation Track and Field and Cross Country meets, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field. Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community.