Posts Tagged ‘back pain treatment’

90% of Back Problems Can Be Resolved Without Surgery

The thought of having to have spine surgery is terrifying to most people. The good news is that only about 10% of patients who have back or neck problems are candidates for surgery. At Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine, we have non operative as well as operative physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of acute back and neck pain injuries. The non-operative physicians, physiatrists, only recommend surgery in the cases where it is absolutely necessary. There are many non-surgical spine treatment options that may fix back problems before opting for surgery. These non-surgical back treatments include anti –inflammatory medication, ice, heat, gentle massage, physical therapy, orthotics, and injections.

Patients should only consider surgery if all of the conservative treatment options have been exhausted. In this short video below, Emory’s non-operative sports medicine and spine physician, Dr. Oluseun A. Olufade describes Emory’s approach to caring for active individuals with back or neck pain. It is important to note that if your physician immediately suggests you have back surgery before giving you other options for your care, it may be a good idea to get a second opinion.

Related Resources:

About Dr. Olufade
Oluseun Olufade, M.D.Dr. Olufade is board certified in Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team. Dr Olufade is also the team physician for Emory University and Blessed Trinity High School.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports medicine injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in treatment of sports related concussions, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at our clinic at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Dr Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Novel Treatment Option for Chronic Low Back Pain

Back pain treatmentMore than 80% of the population will at some time have problematic low back pain. Typically these episodes of low back pain improve with time, but some people have persistent issues. In fact, it is estimated that over 6 million people in the US have chronic low back pain that persists for at least three months.

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics suggests that chronic low back pain is a leading cause of chronic pain. The total cost of low back pain is estimated to be between $100 billion and $200 billion annually. Much of this cost is related to decreased wages and productivity.

Studies suggest that discogenic pain, a painful degenerative disc, is the most common source of chronic low back pain. Unfortunately, there is no great treatment for painful degenerative discs and both conservative and surgical options often fall short in helping people with this issue.

Research at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

The Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center has been a part of an exciting research study that evaluated the injection of stem cells into a patient’s painful degenerative disc. In the study, stem cells called mesenchymal precursor cells that come from bone marrow were injected into a painful degenerative disc.

The early interim analysis of this study is promising. At six months out, a single low dose injection of stem cells led to an average reduction in back pain of 69%. Additionally, 71% were considered to be a “treatment success” as defined by clinically significant improvement in pain and function. Both of these findings were significantly better than controls.

These are only preliminary results but it does provide optimism for a major condition that has been difficult to treat. We are not recruiting patients for this trial but another follow up study may start in a year.

If you are suffering from back or neck pain, you’ll find the comprehensive spine care you need at the Emory Spine Center in Atlanta, Georgia. At Emory, we have the most highly trained spine specialists in the country working together to diagnose and treat spinal disorders. You can call us at 404-778-7000 for appointments. We are on the web at http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/spine/

Related Resources:

About Dr. Beckworth

Dr. Jeremy BeckworthDr. Beckworth is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (Physiatry), Electrodiagnostic Medicine and Pain Medicine. Dr. Beckworth has won multiple teacher of the year awards for the Department of PM&R residency program. He is a section editor for Spineline, a publication of the North American Spine Society. Dr. Beckworth started practicing at Emory in 2007. He has been involved in various research studies. A recent study dealing with anomalous location of the vertebral artery won “best basic science study” at the 20th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Spine Intervention Society. He has been invited as a board examiner for the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

8 Types of Low Back Pain that Mean You Should Visit Your Doctor

Back pain warning signOver 80% of the population will suffer from lower back pain at some point in their lives. Low back pain is a common complaint in medical offices and is a common issue causing many people to miss work and be unable to participate in daily life activities. Sometimes back pain is due to a pulled or strained muscle and many times will not require a trip to your doctor’s office. Other issues such as fractures, tumors and infections of the spine are very serious and need to be evaluated by a physician promptly.

Patients should see a doctor immediately if they experience low back pain as a result of severe trauma. Patients should also make an appointment with a doctor if low back pain is accompanied by any of the following: fever, loss of bowel or bladder control, serious trauma, numbness, unplanned weight loss, personal history of cancer, back pain that persists more than 6 weeks, or severe night pain.

Fever and Back Pain
Fever combined with back pain can indicate an infection in your kidneys or back. A primary care physician can determine if you need antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Loss of control of your bowel or bladder and Back Pain
If you have back pain along with new incontinence, you could have a serious back condition causing pressure on the nerves that requires immediate medical care.

Serious Trauma and Back Pain
Trauma such as a car accident or falling down a flight of stairs can cause a fracture in your back. Seek immediate care from your physician or the emergency department.

Numbness or Tingling in Leg and Back Pain
Numbness on tingling in your leg and back pain could indicate nerve irritation or nerve damage. You could have a herniated disc or spinal stenosis. A doctor can prescribe medications, treatments or even surgery to help relieve the pressure on the nerves.

Unexplained weight loss and Back Pain
If you lose a lot of weight without changing your diet or activity level and have back pain, a doctor should order imaging and blood work to check for cancers or hormonal disorders.

History of Cancer and New Back Pain
If you have had cancer, onset of back pain could be a sign that cancer has spread to you spine. You should visit your physician for further evaluation.

Back Pain at Night
Pain in your back that causes you to lose sleep should not be dismissed. This could be a sign of spinal tumors or even cancer.

Back pain that lasts more than 6 weeks
Any pain that lasts more than a month or two should be evaluated more fully.

If you experience significant trauma and back pain, an evaluation in the Emergency Department is indicated. In most other cases, your primary care physician can evaluate your condition and begin treatment. . If he or she is unable to help with your condition he can refer you to a spine specialist.

For more information about low back pain, visit Spine-Health.com. Our spine physicians at Emory regularly contribute content to this website for not only our own patients, but for anyone searching for spine information.

Dr. Susan DreyerAbout Susan Dreyer, MD
Dr. Dreyer is an Associate Professor in the departments of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Dreyer specializes in non-operative spine care and focuses on helping patients achieve their best functional level. She has taught many national and international courses on spine care and spinal injections for sciatica and other causes of back and neck problems. She is also active in several professional societies. Dr. Dreyer started practicing at Emory in 1992.

 

Related Resources: